Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 55
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(7)2022 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785735

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a sudden decline of renal function and represents a global clinical problem due to an elevated morbidity and mortality. Despite many efforts, currently there are no treatments to halt this devastating condition. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nanoparticles secreted by various cell types in both physiological and pathological conditions. EVs can arise from distinct parts of the kidney and can mediate intercellular communication between various cell types along the nephron. Besides their potential as diagnostic tools, EVs have been proposed as powerful new tools for regenerative medicine and have been broadly studied as therapeutic mediators in different models of experimental AKI. In this review, we present an overview of the basic features and biological relevance of EVs, with an emphasis on their functional role in cell-to-cell communication in the kidney. We explore versatile roles of EVs in crucial pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to AKI and give a detailed description of the renoprotective effects of EVs from different origins in AKI. Finally, we explain known mechanisms of action of EVs in AKI and provide an outlook on the potential clinical translation of EVs in the setting of AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Extracellular Vesicles , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Humans , Kidney/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(4)2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715402

ABSTRACT

Platelets, which are small anuclear cell fragments, play important roles in thrombosis and hemostasis, but also actively release factors that can both suppress and induce viral infections. Platelet-released factors include sCD40L, microvesicles (MVs), and alpha granules that have the capacity to exert either pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory effects depending on the virus. These factors are prime targets for use in extracellular vesicle (EV)-based therapy due to their ability to reduce viral infections and exert anti-inflammatory effects. While there are some studies regarding platelet microvesicle-based (PMV-based) therapy, there is still much to learn about PMVs before such therapy can be used. This review provides the background necessary to understand the roles of platelet-released factors, how these factors might be useful in PMV-based therapy, and a critical discussion of current knowledge of platelets and their role in viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Factors/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Animals , Cell-Derived Microparticles/metabolism , Humans , Platelet Activation/physiology
3.
FASEB J ; 36(3): e22234, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702985

ABSTRACT

The transmembrane protease angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a protective regulator within the renin angiotensin system and additionally represents the cellular receptor for SARS-CoV. The release of soluble ACE2 (sACE2) from the cell surface is hence believed to be a crucial part of its (patho)physiological functions, as both, ACE2 protease activity and SARS-CoV binding ability, are transferred from the cell membrane to body fluids. Yet, the molecular sources of sACE2 are still not completely investigated. In this study, we show different sources and prerequisites for the release of sACE2 from the cell membrane. By using inhibitors as well as CRISPR/Cas9-derived cells, we demonstrated that, in addition to the metalloprotease ADAM17, also ADAM10 is an important novel shedding protease of ACE2. Moreover, we observed that ACE2 can also be released in extracellular vesicles. The degree of either ADAM10- or ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding is dependent on stimulatory conditions and on the expression level of the pro-inflammatory ADAM17 regulator iRhom2. Finally, by using structural analysis and in vitro verification, we determined for the first time that the susceptibility to ADAM10- and ADAM17-mediated shedding is mediated by the collectrin-like part of ACE2. Overall, our findings give novel insights into sACE2 release by several independent molecular mechanisms.


Subject(s)
ADAM10 Protein/metabolism , ADAM17 Protein/metabolism , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , ADAM10 Protein/genetics , ADAM17 Protein/genetics , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Extracellular Vesicles/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(12): 1240-1254, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699219

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles and exomere nanoparticles are under intense investigation as sources of clinically relevant cargo. Here we report the discovery of a distinct extracellular nanoparticle, termed supermere. Supermeres are morphologically distinct from exomeres and display a markedly greater uptake in vivo compared with small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. The protein and RNA composition of supermeres differs from small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Supermeres are highly enriched with cargo involved in multiple cancers (glycolytic enzymes, TGFBI, miR-1246, MET, GPC1 and AGO2), Alzheimer's disease (APP) and cardiovascular disease (ACE2, ACE and PCSK9). The majority of extracellular RNA is associated with supermeres rather than small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Cancer-derived supermeres increase lactate secretion, transfer cetuximab resistance and decrease hepatic lipids and glycogen in vivo. This study identifies a distinct functional nanoparticle replete with potential circulating biomarkers and therapeutic targets for a host of human diseases.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nanoparticles/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biological Transport/physiology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Cell Communication/physiology , Cell Line, Tumor , HeLa Cells , Humans , Lactic Acid/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Nanoparticles/classification , Neoplasms/pathology , Tumor Microenvironment
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674661

ABSTRACT

Breast cancers and cancers of the genitourinary tract are the most common malignancies among men and women and are still characterized by high mortality rates. In order to improve the outcomes, early diagnosis is crucial, ideally by applying non-invasive and specific biomarkers. A key role in this field is played by extracellular vesicles (EVs), lipid bilayer-delimited structures shed from the surface of almost all cell types, including cancer cells. Subcellular structures contained in EVs such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids can be isolated and exploited as biomarkers, since they directly stem from parental cells. Furthermore, it is becoming even more evident that different body fluids can also serve as sources of EVs for diagnostic purposes. In this review, EV isolation and characterization methods are described. Moreover, the potential contribution of EV cargo for diagnostic discovery purposes is described for each tumor.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Urogenital Neoplasms/diagnosis , Animals , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Female , Humans , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/metabolism , Nucleic Acids/metabolism , Urogenital Neoplasms/metabolism
6.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 405, 2022 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631967

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused the pandemic of the coronavirus induced disease 2019 (COVID-19) with evolving variants of concern. It remains urgent to identify novel approaches against broad strains of SARS-CoV-2, which infect host cells via the entry receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Herein, we report an increase in circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) that express ACE2 (evACE2) in plasma of COVID-19 patients, which levels are associated with severe pathogenesis. Importantly, evACE2 isolated from human plasma or cells neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 infection by competing with cellular ACE2. Compared to vesicle-free recombinant human ACE2 (rhACE2), evACE2 shows a 135-fold higher potency in blocking the binding of the viral spike protein RBD, and a 60- to 80-fold higher efficacy in preventing infections by both pseudotyped and authentic SARS-CoV-2. Consistently, evACE2 protects the hACE2 transgenic mice from SARS-CoV-2-induced lung injury and mortality. Furthermore, evACE2 inhibits the infection of SARS-CoV-2 variants (α, ß, and δ) with equal or higher potency than for the wildtype strain, supporting a broad-spectrum antiviral mechanism of evACE2 for therapeutic development to block the infection of existing and future coronaviruses that use the ACE2 receptor.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Extracellular Vesicles/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Extracellular Vesicles/genetics , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , Mice, Transgenic , Neutralization Tests/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis , Vero Cells
7.
Biochem Soc Trans ; 50(1): 447-457, 2022 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599610

ABSTRACT

Obesity and its associated metabolic diseases, including diabetes, insulin resistance, and inflammation, are rapidly becoming a global health concern. Moreover, obese individuals are more likely to be infected with COVID-19. New research on adipose tissue is required to help us understand these metabolic diseases and their regulatory processes. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been identified as novel intercellular vectors with a wide range of regulatory functions. The miRNAs carried by EVs participate in the regulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) browning, insulin resistance, diabetes, and inflammation. In addition, EV miRNAs demonstrate great potential for helping elucidating the mechanism of metabolic diseases, and for advancing their prevention and treatment. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the regulation of adipose differentiation and metabolic diseases by adipose-derived EV miRNAs. Understanding the role of these miRNAs should enrich our understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by obesity.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs , Obesity/metabolism , Animals , Humans
8.
Cells ; 11(1)2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580990

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) and viruses share common features: size, structure, biogenesis and uptake. In order to generate EVs expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on their surface (S-EVs), we collected EVs from SARS-CoV-2 spike expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293T) cells by stable transfection with a vector coding for the S1 and S2 subunits. S-EVs were characterized using nanoparticle tracking analysis, ExoView and super-resolution microscopy. We obtained a population of EVs of 50 to 200 nm in size. Spike expressing EVs represented around 40% of the total EV population and co-expressed spike protein with tetraspanins on the surfaces of EVs. We subsequently used ACE2-positive endothelial and bronchial epithelial cells for assessing the internalization of labeled S-EVs using a cytofluorimetric analysis. Internalization of S-EVs was higher than that of control EVs from non-transfected cells. Moreover, S-EV uptake was significantly decreased by anti-ACE2 antibody pre-treatment. Furthermore, colchicine, a drug currently used in clinical trials, significantly reduced S-EV entry into the cells. S-EVs represent a simple, safe, and scalable model to study host-virus interactions and the mechanisms of novel therapeutic drugs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Blocking/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Colchicine/pharmacology , Flow Cytometry/methods , HEK293 Cells , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Microscopy, Fluorescence/methods , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
J Extracell Vesicles ; 10(14): e12170, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555701

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S) binds to human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2), allowing virus to dock on cell membrane follow by viral entry. Here, we use high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) for real-time visualization of S, and its interaction with hACE2 and small extracellular vesicles (sEVs). Results show conformational heterogeneity of S, flexibility of S stalk and receptor-binding domain (RBD), and pH/temperature-induced conformational change of S. S in an S-ACE2 complex appears as an all-RBD up conformation. The complex acquires a distinct topology upon acidification. S and S2 subunit demonstrate different membrane docking mechanisms on sEVs. S-hACE2 interaction facilitates S to dock on sEVs, implying the feasibility of ACE2-expressing sEVs for viral neutralization. In contrary, S2 subunit docks on lipid layer and enters sEV using its fusion peptide, mimicking the viral entry scenario. Altogether, our study provides a platform that is suitable for real-time visualization of various entry inhibitors, neutralizing antibodies, and sEV-based decoy in blocking viral entry. Teaser: Comprehensive observation of SARS-CoV-2 spike and its interaction with receptor ACE2 and sEV-based decoy in real time using HS-AFM.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Lipid Bilayers/metabolism , Microscopy, Atomic Force , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , Protein Subunits , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Temperature , Virus Internalization
10.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551568

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global challenge, demanding researchers address different approaches in relation to prevention, diagnostics and therapeutics. Amongst the many tactics of tackling these therapeutic challenges, small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) or exosomes are emerging as a new frontier in the field of ameliorating viral infections. Exosomes are part of extracellular vesicles (EVs)-spherical biological structures with a lipid bilayer of a diameter of up to 5000 nm, which are released into the intercellular space by most types of eukaryotic cells, both in physiological and pathological states. EVs share structural similarities to viruses, such as small size, common mechanisms of biogenesis and mechanisms for cell entry. The role of EVs in promoting the viral spread by evading the immune response of the host, which is exhibited by retroviruses, indicates the potential for further investigation and possible manipulation of these processes when tackling the spread and treatment of COVID-19. The following paper introduces the topic of the use of exosomes in the treatment of viral infections, and presents the future prospects for the use of these EVs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518359

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) are bioactive particles that evoke beneficial responses in recipient cells. We identified a role for MSC-EV in immune modulation and cellular salvage in a model of SARS-CoV-2 induced acute lung injury (ALI) using pulmonary epithelial cells and exposure to cytokines or the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD). Whereas RBD or cytokine exposure caused a pro-inflammatory cellular environment and injurious signaling, impairing alveolar-capillary barrier function, and inducing cell death, MSC-EVs reduced inflammation and reestablished target cell health. Importantly, MSC-EV treatment increased active ACE2 surface protein compared to RBD injury, identifying a previously unknown role for MSC-EV treatment in COVID-19 signaling and pathogenesis. The beneficial effect of MSC-EV treatment was confirmed in an LPS-induced rat model of ALI wherein MSC-EVs reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and respiratory dysfunction associated with disease. MSC-EV administration was dose-responsive, demonstrating a large effective dose range for clinical translation. These data provide direct evidence of an MSC-EV-mediated improvement in ALI and contribute new insights into the therapeutic potential of MSC-EVs in COVID-19 or similar pathologies of respiratory distress.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/complications , Acute Lung Injury/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Extracellular Vesicles/ultrastructure , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Models, Biological , Pneumonia/pathology , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction , THP-1 Cells
12.
J Leukoc Biol ; 111(1): 63-74, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499279

ABSTRACT

Platelets and platelet extracellular vesicles (pEV) are at the crossroads of coagulation and immunity. Extracellular vesicles are messengers that not only transmit signals between cells, but also provide information about the status of their cell of origin. Thus, pEVs have potential as both biomarkers of platelet activation and contributors to pathology. Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19), caused by infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a complex disease affecting multiple organs and is characterized by a high degree of inflammation and risk of thrombosis in some patients. In this review, we introduce pEVs as valuable biomarkers in disease with a special focus on their potential as predictors of and contributors to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Humans , Receptors, Virus/metabolism
13.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5739, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475293

ABSTRACT

Protein aggregates associated with neurodegenerative diseases have the ability to transmit to unaffected cells, thereby templating their own aberrant conformation onto soluble homotypic proteins. Proteopathic seeds can be released into the extracellular space, secreted in association with extracellular vesicles (EV) or exchanged by direct cell-to-cell contact. The extent to which each of these pathways contribute to the prion-like spreading of protein misfolding is unclear. Exchange of cellular cargo by both direct cell contact or via EV depends on receptor-ligand interactions. We hypothesized that enabling these interactions through viral ligands enhances intercellular proteopathic seed transmission. Using different cellular models propagating prions or pathogenic Tau aggregates, we demonstrate that vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein and SARS-CoV-2 spike S increase aggregate induction by cell contact or ligand-decorated EV. Thus, receptor-ligand interactions are important determinants of intercellular aggregate dissemination. Our data raise the possibility that viral infections contribute to proteopathic seed spreading by facilitating intercellular cargo transfer.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Protein Aggregation, Pathological/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Brain/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Cell Line , Endocytosis , Female , Humans , Intravital Microscopy , Male , Middle Aged , Prions/metabolism , Protein Aggregation, Pathological/pathology , Protein Folding , tau Proteins/metabolism
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(12)2021 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472414

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are rising in global prevalence and cause significant morbidity for patients. Current treatments are limited to slowing instead of stabilising or reversing disease progression. In this review, we describe mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their constituents, extracellular vesicles (EVs) as being a novel therapeutic for CKD. MSC-derived EVs (MSC-EVs) are membrane-enclosed particles, including exosomes, which carry genetic information that mimics the phenotype of their cell of origin. MSC-EVs deliver their cargo of mRNA, miRNA, cytokines, and growth factors to target cells as a form of paracrine communication. This genetically reprograms pathophysiological pathways, which are upregulated in renal failure. Since the method of exosome preparation significantly affects the quality and function of MSC-exosomes, this review compares the methodologies for isolating exosomes from MSCs and their role in tissue regeneration. More specifically, it summarises the therapeutic efficacy of MSC-EVs in 60 preclinical animal models of AKI and CKD and the cargo of biomolecules they deliver. MSC-EVs promote tubular proliferation and angiogenesis, and inhibit apoptosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and fibrosis, to alleviate AKI and CKD. By reprogramming these pathophysiological pathways, MSC-EVs can slow or even reverse the progression of AKI to CKD, and therefore offer potential to transform clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Biological Therapy , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/transplantation , Kidney Diseases/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Animals , Apoptosis/drug effects , Biological Therapy/methods , Cell Differentiation , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Self Renewal , Chemical Fractionation , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Kidney Diseases/pathology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Protective Agents , Renal Insufficiency/diagnosis , Renal Insufficiency/etiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/diagnosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/etiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/metabolism , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy
15.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458308

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been identified as novel mediators of intercellular communication. They work via delivering the sequestered cargo to cells in the close vicinity, as well as distant sites in the body, regulating pathophysiological processes. Cell death and inflammation are biologically crucial processes in both normal physiology and pathology. These processes are indistinguishably linked with their effectors modulating the other process. For instance, during an unresolvable infection, the upregulation of specific immune mediators leads to inflammation causing cell death and tissue damage. EVs have gained considerable interest as mediators of both cell death and inflammation during conditions, such as sepsis. This review summarizes the types of extracellular vesicles known to date and their roles in mediating immune responses leading to cell death and inflammation with specific focus on sepsis and lung inflammation.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cell Death , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Lung/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/immunology , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Communication , Chemokines , Exosomes , Humans , Lung/immunology , Mice , Sepsis/physiopathology
16.
J Extracell Vesicles ; 10(12): e12141, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451869

ABSTRACT

Preclinical studies suggest mesenchymal stromal cell extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) reduce inflammation and improve organ function in lung diseases; however, an objective analysis of all available data is needed prior to translation. Using rigorous meta-research methods, we determined the effectiveness of MSC-EVs for preclinical respiratory diseases and identified experimental conditions that may further refine this therapy. A systematic search of MEDLINE/Embase identified 1167 records. After screening, 52 articles were included for data extraction and evaluated for risk of bias and quality of reporting in study design. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted for acute lung injury (ALI; N = 23), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD; N = 8) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; N = 7). Subgroup analyses identified EV methods/characteristics that may be associated with improved efficacy. Data is presented as standardized mean differences (SMD) or risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For ALI, MSC-EVs markedly reduced lung injury (SMD -4.33, CI -5.73 to -2.92), vascular permeability (SMD -2.43, CI -3.05 to -1.82), and mortality (RR 0.39, CI 0.22 to 0.68). Small EVs were more consistently effective than large EVs whereas no differences were observed between tissue sources, immunocompatibility or isolation techniques. For BPD, alveolarization was improved by MSC-EVs (SMD -1.45, CI -2.08 to -0.82) with small EVs more consistently beneficial then small/large EVs. In PAH, right ventricular systolic pressure (SMD -4.16, CI -5.68 to -2.64) and hypertrophy (SMD -2.80, CI -3.68 to -1.91) were significantly attenuated by EVs. In BPD and PAH, EVs isolated by ultracentrifugation demonstrated therapeutic benefit whereas tangential flow filtration (N = 2) displayed minimal efficacy. Lastly, risk of bias and quality of reporting for experimental design were consistently unclear across all studies. Our findings demonstrate clear potential of MSC-EVs to be developed as therapy for acute and chronic lung diseases. However, greater transparency in research design and direct comparisons of isolation technique and EV subtypes are needed to generate robust evidence to guide clinical translation. Protocol Registration: PROSPERO CRD42020145334.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Respiration Disorders/therapy , Acute Disease , Animals , Chronic Disease , Disease Models, Animal , Humans
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444229

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry important biomolecules, including metabolites, and contribute to the spread and pathogenesis of some viruses. However, to date, limited data are available on EV metabolite content that might play a crucial role during infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Therefore, this study aimed to perform untargeted metabolomics to identify key metabolites and associated pathways that are present in EVs, isolated from the serum of COVID-19 patients. The results showed the presence of antivirals and antibiotics such as Foscarnet, Indinavir, and lymecycline in EVs from patients treated with these drugs. Moreover, increased levels of anti-inflammatory metabolites such as LysoPS, 7-α,25-Dihydroxycholesterol, and 15-d-PGJ2 were detected in EVs from COVID-19 patients when compared with controls. Further, we found decreased levels of metabolites associated with coagulation, such as thromboxane and elaidic acid, in EVs from COVID-19 patients. These findings suggest that EVs not only carry active drug molecules but also anti-inflammatory metabolites, clearly suggesting that exosomes might play a crucial role in negotiating with heightened inflammation during COVID-19 infection. These preliminary results could also pave the way for the identification of novel metabolites that might act as critical regulators of inflammatory pathways during viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Metabolome , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Metabolomics , Middle Aged
18.
Curr Stem Cell Res Ther ; 16(4): 465-480, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435707

ABSTRACT

The cause of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) known as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, formerly designated 2019-nCoV) was first discovered in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. It then spread rapidly worldwide. Investigation for the discovery of drugs to cure this disease continues. The currently accepted treatments are supportive, but there is no specific disease curing intervention found yet. Since mid-February, therapies involving Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs) have been proposed for the treatment of patients with COVID-19. In light of these recent developments, this review will focus on: i) the mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 action and the subsequent pathology in COVID-19, ii) the proposed mechanism( s) of outcome-improving action of MSCs or MSC-derived extracellular vesicles in COVID-19 pneumonia, iii) registered MSC-based clinical trials and interventions for the treatment of COVID-19, iv) published case studies/series/trials reporting the use of MSC-based treatments in COVID-19 cases, and finally v) the need for authority regulations and clinical guidelines for MSCbased treatment strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/standards , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
19.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408629

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-released, nanometer-scaled, membrane-bound materials and contain diverse contents including proteins, small peptides, and nucleic acids. Once released, EVs can alter the microenvironment and regulate a myriad of cellular physiology components, including cell-cell communication, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses against viral infection. Among the cargoes in the vesicles, small non-coding micro-RNAs (miRNAs) have received attention in that they can regulate the expression of a variety of human genes as well as external viral genes via binding to the complementary mRNAs. In this study, we tested the potential of EVs as therapeutic agents for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. First, we found that the mesenchymal stem-cell-derived EVs (MSC-EVs) enabled the rescue of the cytopathic effect of SARS-CoV-2 virus and the suppression of proinflammatory responses in the infected cells by inhibiting the viral replication. We found that these anti-viral responses were mediated by 17 miRNAs matching the rarely mutated, conserved 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of the viral genome. The top five miRNAs highly expressed in the MSC-EVs, miR-92a-3p, miR-26a-5p, miR-23a-3p, miR-103a-3p, and miR-181a-5p, were tested. They were bound to the complemented sequence which led to the recovery of the cytopathic effects. These findings suggest that the MSC-EVs are a potential candidate for multiple variants of anti-SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , MicroRNAs/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , 3' Untranslated Regions/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Base Sequence , Cell Line , Conserved Sequence/genetics , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Models, Biological , Mutation/genetics , Placenta/metabolism , Pregnancy , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383877

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, are newly recognized fundamental, universally produced natural nanoparticles of life that are seemingly involved in all biologic processes and clinical diseases. Due to their universal involvements, understanding the nature and also the potential therapeutic uses of these nanovesicles requires innovative experimental approaches in virtually every field. Of the EV group, exosome nanovesicles and larger companion micro vesicles can mediate completely new biologic and clinical processes dependent on the intercellular transfer of proteins and most importantly selected RNAs, particularly miRNAs between donor and targeted cells to elicit epigenetic alterations inducing functional cellular changes. These recipient acceptor cells are nearby (paracrine transfers) or far away after distribution via the circulation (endocrine transfers). The major properties of such vesicles seem to have been conserved over eons, suggesting that they may have ancient evolutionary origins arising perhaps even before cells in the primordial soup from which life evolved. Their potential ancient evolutionary attributes may be responsible for the ability of some modern-day exosomes to withstand unusually harsh conditions, perhaps due to unique membrane lipid compositions. This is exemplified by ability of the maternal milk exosomes to survive passing the neonatal acid/enzyme rich stomach. It is postulated that this resistance also applies to their durable presence in phagolysosomes, thus suggesting a unique intracellular release of their contained miRNAs. A major discussed issue is the generally poorly realized superiority of these naturally evolved nanovesicles for therapies when compared to human-engineered artificial nanoparticles, e.g., for the treatment of diseases like cancers.


Subject(s)
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Exosomes/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL