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1.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 17(1): 282, 2022 Nov 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Veno-venous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an effective, but highly resource intensive salvage treatment option in COVID patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a known sequelae of COVID-19 induced ARDS, yet there is a paucity of data on the incidence and determinants of RV dysfunction on VV ECMO. We retrospectively examined the determining factors leading to RV failure and means of early identification of this phenomenon in patients on VV ECMO. METHODS: The data was extracted from March 2020 to March 2021 from the regional University of Washington Extracorporeal Life Support database. The inclusion criteria included patients > 18 years of age with diagnosis of COVID-19. All had already been intubated and mechanically ventilated prior to VV ECMO deployment. Univariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors and surrogate markers for RV dysfunction. In addition, we compared outcomes between those with and without RV dysfunction. RESULTS: Of the 33 patients that met inclusion criteria, 14 (42%) had echocardiographic evidence of RV dysfunction, 3 of whom were placed on right ventricular assist device support. Chronic lung disease was an independent risk factor for RV dysfunction (p = 0.0002). RV dysfunction was associated with a six-fold increase in troponin I (0.07 ng/ml vs. 0.44 ng/ml, p = 0.039) and four-fold increase in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) (158 pg/ml vs. 662 pg/ml, p = 0.037). Deep vein thrombosis (DVT, 21% vs. 43%, p = 0.005) and pulmonary embolism (PE, 11% vs. 21%, p = 0.045) were found to be nearly twice as common in the RV dysfunction group. Total survival rate to hospital discharge was 39%. Data trended towards shorter duration of hospital stay (47 vs. 65.6 days, p = 0.15), shorter duration of ECMO support (21 days vs. 36 days, p = 0.06) and improved survival rate to hospital discharge (42.1% vs. 35.7%, p = 0.47) for those with intact RV function compared to the RV dysfunction group. CONCLUSIONS: RV dysfunction in critically ill patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in common. Trends of troponin I and BNP may be important surrogates for monitoring RV function in patients on VV ECMO. We recommend echocardiographic assessment of the RV on such patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Troponin I
2.
ASAIO J ; 68(10): 1233-1240, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107650

ABSTRACT

Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support surged during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our program changed the model of care pursuing to protect the multidisciplinary team from the risk of infection and to serve as many patients as possible. Patient-healthcare interactions were restricted, and the ECMO bed capacity was increased by reducing the ECMO specialist-patient ratio to 1:4 with non-ECMO trained nurses support. The outcomes worsened and we paused while we evaluated and modified our model of care. The ECMO bed capacity was reduced to allow a nurse ECMO-specialist nurse ratio 2:1 with an ECMO trained nurse assistant's support. Intensivists, general practitioners, nurse assistants, and physical and respiratory therapists were trained on ECMO. Tracheostomy, bronchoscopy, and microbiological molecular diagnosis were done earlier, and family visits and rehabilitation were allowed in the first 48 hours of ECMO cannulation. There were 35 patients in the preintervention cohort and 66 in the postintervention cohort. Ninety days mortality was significantly lower after the intervention (62.9% vs. 31.8%, p = 0.003). Factors associated with increased risk of death were the need for cannulation or conversion to veno arterial or veno arterio venous ECMO, hemorrhagic stroke, and renal replacement therapy during ECMO. The interventions associated with a decrease in the risk of death were the following: early fiberoptic bronchoscopy and microbiological molecular diagnostic tests. Increasing the ECMO multidisciplinary team in relation to the number of patients and the earlier performance of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, such as tracheostomy, fiberoptic bronchoscopy, molecular microbiological diagnosis of pneumonia, rehabilitation, and family support significantly decreased mortality of patients on ECMO due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , COVID-19/therapy , Catheterization , Cohort Studies , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
4.
J Invasive Cardiol ; 34(11): E825, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2093175

ABSTRACT

Left ventricular (LV) unloading has been associated with improved survival in patients treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This case describes a patient with a COVID-19 infection who subsequently developed non-ischemic cardiomyopathy with an LV ejection fraction of 10% to 15% (baseline echocardiography). He did poorly in the outpatient setting and was admitted to an outside hospital with heart failure symptoms and was subsequently transferred to our hospital for escalation of care and consideration of advanced heart failure therapies. This clinical image and related video series help to visually demonstrate the effect of LV unloading in a 30-year-old male with a history of COVID-19 myocarditis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Heart Failure , Heart-Assist Devices , Male , Humans , Adult , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Heart Ventricles , Ventricular Function, Left , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy
5.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 674-680, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087891

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). RECENT FINDINGS: Availability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited. SUMMARY: Indications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system. VIDEO ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/COCC/A43.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Triage , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Selection , Quality of Life
6.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 681-685, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087889

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this article, we describe preoperative patient selection and outcomes of patients with lung disease secondary to infection from COVID-19 who receive lung transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: Lung transplants for patients with lung disease secondary to infection from COVID-19 have been performed successfully in over 200 patients in the United States. The preoperative course of these patients is somewhat atypical in comparison with patients who have had lung transplants related to chronic lung diseases, where there are more traditional indications for lung transplants. COVID-19 patients have more severe pulmonary disease often requiring mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal mechanical ventilation (ECMO), frequent nosocomial infections, and renal and cardiac dysfunction. The intraoperative course of these COVID-19 patients is often longer and requires increased transfusions of blood products in comparison with non-COVID-19 patients. Additionally, in the postoperative period, COVID-19 patients more frequently require mechanical ventilation and ECMO support. However, the survival rate of such patients at 6 months is greater than 90%. SUMMARY: Patients with respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19 infection that require a lung transplant generally have a complicated preoperative course and the operations are more complex, but the long-term outcomes are excellent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Lung Diseases , Lung Transplantation , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Lung Diseases/surgery , Retrospective Studies
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17423, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077097

ABSTRACT

Acute brain injuries such as intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and ischemic stroke have been reported in critically ill COVID-19 patients as well as in patients treated with veno-venous (VV)-ECMO independently of their COVID-19 status. The purpose of this study was to compare critically ill COVID-19 patients with and without VV-ECMO treatment with regard to acute neurological symptoms, pathological neuroimaging findings (PNIF) and long-term deficits. The single center study was conducted in critically ill COVID-19 patients between February 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021. Demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters were extracted from the hospital's databases. Retrospective imaging modalities included head computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Follow-up MRI and neurological examinations were performed on survivors > 6 months after the primary occurrence. Of the 440 patients, 67 patients received VV-ECMO treatment (15%). Sixty-four patients (24 with VV-ECMO) developed acute neurological symptoms (pathological levels of arousal/brain stem function/motor responses) during their ICU stay and underwent neuroimaging with brain CT as the primary modality. Critically ill COVID-19 patients who received VV-ECMO treatment had a significantly lower survival during their hospital stay compared to those without (p < 0.001). Among patients treated with VV-ECMO, 10% showed acute PNIF in one of the imaging modalities during their ICU stay (vs. 4% of patients in the overall COVID-19 ICU cohort). Furthermore, 9% showed primary or secondary ICH of any severity (vs. 3% overall), 6% exhibited severe ICH (vs. 1% overall) and 1.5% were found to have non-hemorrhagic cerebral infarctions (vs. < 1% overall). There was a weak, positive correlation between patients treated with VV-ECMO and the development of acute neurological symptoms. However, the association between the VV-ECMO treatment and acute PNIF was negligible. Two survivors (one with VV-ECMO-treatment/one without) showed innumerable microhemorrhages, predominantly involving the juxtacortical white matter. None of the survivors exhibited diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Every seventh COVID-19 patient developed acute neurological symptoms during their ICU stay, but only every twenty-fifth patient had PNIF which were mostly ICH. VV-ECMO was found to be a weak risk factor for neurological complications (resulting in a higher imaging rate), but not for PNIF. Although logistically complex, repeated neuroimaging should, thus, be considered in all critically ill COVID-19 patients since ICH may have an impact on the treatment decisions and outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Humans , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Critical Illness/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Prevalence , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Neuroimaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology
9.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 17(1): 263, 2022 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064825

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Crescent cannula adhesion in the setting of COVID-19 respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support is a novel complication. The objective of this case presentation is to highlight this rare complication and to explore potential predisposing factors and our management strategies. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 25 y.o. patient with COVID-19 respiratory failure requiring ECMO support for 16-days in which a 32 Fr crescent cannula became adherent to the SVC and proximal jugular vein. Attempts to remove the cannula at the bedside failed due to immobility of the cannula. Ultrasound of the right neck was unremarkable, so he was taken to the hybrid OR where both TEE and fluoroscopy were unrevealing. An upper sternotomy was performed, and the superior vena cava and proximal jugular vein were dissected revealing a 2 cm segment of the distal SVC and proximal jugular vein that was densely sclerosed and adherent to the cannula. The vessel was opened across the adherent area at the level of the innominate vein and the cannula was then able to be withdrawn. The patient suffered no ill effects and had an unremarkable recovery to discharge. CONCLUSIONS: To date, there have been no reports of crescent cannula adhesion related complications. In patients with COVID-19 respiratory failure requiring ECMO, clinicians should be aware of widespread hypercoagulability and the potential of unprovoked, localized venous sclerosis and cannula adhesion. We report our technique of decannulation in the setting of cannula adhesion and hope that presentation will shed further light on this complication allowing clinicians to optimize patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , COVID-19/therapy , Cannula , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Humans , Male , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Vena Cava, Superior
10.
Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) ; 71(4): 228-231, 2022 Oct.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048892

ABSTRACT

A 45 years old female patient was admitted to our facility for COVID -19 infection complicated by fulminant cardiac injury and refractory cardiogemic shock. She had echographic findings of reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She was successfully treated by VA-ECMO allowing complete revocery of the left ventricule function and weaning from support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy , COVID-19/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/complications , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/therapy
11.
Can J Anaesth ; 69(10): 1300-1304, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Freon™ is a halogenated hydrocarbon often used as a refrigerant. When inhaled recreationally, it has the desired effects of euphoria and intoxication. Toxic effects include cardiovascular and neurologic insults such as arrhythmias and seizures, and less well-described toxicities include airway and lung injury. The treatment in general is primarily supportive. CLINICAL FEATURES: We present the case of a 42-yr-old previously healthy male who developed acute bronchiolitis and pneumonitis following inhalation of Freon leading to severe respiratory failure. He was supported by veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and managed with high-dose corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an inhaled Freon exposure resulting in acute lung injury refractory to conventional therapy that was salvaged by vv-ECMO as a bridge towards a full recovery.


RéSUMé: CONTEXTE: Le Fréon™ est un hydrocarbure halogéné souvent utilisé comme réfrigérant. Lorsqu'il est inhalé à des fins récréatives, il a les effets souhaités d'euphorie et d'intoxication. Les effets toxiques comprennent les lésions cardiovasculaires et neurologiques telles que les arythmies et les convulsions, et les toxicités moins bien décrites comprennent les lésions des voies aériennes et des poumons. En général, le traitement est principalement un traitement de soutien. CARACTéRISTIQUES CLINIQUES: Nous présentons le cas d'un homme de 42 ans auparavant en bonne santé qui a développé une bronchiolite et une pneumonite aiguës après inhalation de Fréon, entraînant une insuffisance respiratoire sévère. Il a été supplémenté par oxygénation par membrane extracorporelle veino-veineuse et pris en charge avec des corticostéroïdes à forte dose. CONCLUSION: À notre connaissance, il s'agit de la première présentation de cas d'exposition au Fréon inhalé entraînant une lésion pulmonaire aiguë réfractaire au traitement conventionnel et pour laquelle un sauvetage par ECMO-VV a favorisé un rétablissement complet.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Insufficiency , Chlorofluorocarbons , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Humans , Male , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy
12.
Pediatr Crit Care Med ; 23(4): 268-276, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042669

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Children receiving prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support may benefit from tracheostomy during ECMO by facilitating rehabilitation; however, the procedure carries risks, especially hemorrhagic complications. Knowledge of tracheostomy practices and outcomes of ECMO-supported children who undergo tracheostomy on ECMO may inform decision-making. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: ECMO centers contributing to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry. PATIENTS: Children from birth to 18 years who received ECMO support for greater than or equal to 7 days for respiratory failure from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2019. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Three thousand six hundred eighty-five children received at least 7 days of ECMO support for respiratory failure. The median duration of ECMO support was 13.0 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9.3-19.9 d), and inhospital mortality was 38.7% (1,426/3,685). A tracheostomy was placed during ECMO support in 94/3,685 (2.6%). Of those who received a tracheostomy on ECMO, the procedure was performed at a median 13.2 days (IQR, 6.3-25.9 d) after initiation of ECMO. Surgical site bleeding was documented in 26% of children who received a tracheostomy (12% after tracheostomy placement). Among children who received a tracheostomy, the median duration of ECMO support was 24.2 days (IQR, 13.0-58.7 d); inhospital mortality was 30/94 (32%). Those that received a tracheostomy before 14 days on ECMO were older (median age, 15.8 yr [IQR, 4.7-15.5] vs 11.7 yr [IQR, 11.5-17.3 yr]; p =0.002) and more likely to have been supported on venovenous-ECMO (84% vs 52%; p = 0.001). Twenty-two percent (11/50) of those who received a tracheostomy before 14 days died in the hospital, compared with 19/44 (43%) of those who received a tracheostomy at 14 days or later (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Tracheostomies during ECMO were uncommon in children. One in four patients who received a tracheostomy on ECMO had surgical site bleeding. Children who had tracheostomies placed after 14 days were younger and had worse outcomes, potentially representing tracheostomy as a "secondary" strategy for prolonged ECMO support.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Insufficiency , Adolescent , Child , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , Tracheostomy/methods
14.
BMC Pediatr ; 22(1): 138, 2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To assess the outcome of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe adenovirus (Adv) pneumonia with refractory hypoxic respiratory failure (RHRF) in paediatric patients. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in China. Patients with RHRF caused by Adv pneumonia who received ECMO support after mechanical ventilation failed to achieve adequate oxygenation between 2017 and 2020 were included. The outcome variables were the in-hospital survival rate and the effects of ECMO on the survival rate. RESULTS: In total, 18 children with RHRF received ECMO. The median age was 19 (9.5, 39.8) months, and the median ECMO duration was 196 (152, 309) h. The in-hospital survival rate was 72.2% (13/18). Thirteen patients (72.2%) required continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) due to fluid imbalance or acute kidney injury (AKI). At ECMO initiation, compared with survivors, nonsurvivors had a lower PaO2/FiO2 ratio [49 (34.5, 62) vs. 63 (56, 71); p = 0.04], higher oxygen index (OI) [41 (34.5, 62) vs. 30 (26.5, 35); p = 0.03], higher vasoactive inotropic score (VIS) [30 (16.3, 80) vs. 100 (60, 142.5); p = 0.04], longer duration from mechanical ventilation to ECMO support [8 (4, 14) vs. 4 (3, 5.5) h, p=0.02], and longer time from confirmed RHRF to ECMO initiation [9 (4.8, 13) vs. 5 (1.3, 5.5) h; p = 0.004]. Patients with PaO2/FiO2 <61 mmHg or an OI >43 and hypoxic respiratory failure for more than 9 days before the initiation of ECMO had worse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: ECMO seemed to be effective, as severe paediatric Adv pneumonia patients with RHRF had a cumulative survival rate of 72.2% in our study. Our study provides insight into ECMO rescue in children with severe Adv pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae Infections , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Pneumonia, Viral , Respiratory Insufficiency , Adenoviridae , Adult , Child , China , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Oxygen , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
16.
Semin Thromb Hemost ; 48(7): 814-827, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2028759

ABSTRACT

Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications continue to remain frequent complications that significantly impact the morbidity and mortality of patients implanted with mechanical circulatory support devices (MCSDs). The severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in a number of COVID-19 patients being supported by MCSDs, specifically extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), which in turn has created a crucial need for rapid assessment of hemostatic status in these patients to avoid bleeding and thrombotic complications. Currently, conventional plasma-based coagulation assays such as prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are used to assess hemostasis, and the activated clotting time (ACT) and aPTT are the most common tests used to monitor heparin anticoagulation in patients on ECMO. Unfractionated heparin remains the mainstay anticoagulation therapy for patients on ECMO. Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) offers little guidance on the subject but does state that each institution should create its internal anticoagulation protocols. Viscoelastic assays (VEAs) are increasingly recognized by ELSO and ECMO community for their potential to assess hemostatic derangements in patients implanted with MCSDs as well as guidance for appropriate hemostatic therapy. This review focuses on the evidence for the use of viscoelastic assays to assess overall hemostasis and to guide the treatment of adult patients connected to an ECMO circuit. Limitations of the use of conventional assays, ACT, and VEA are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Hemostatics , Adult , Humans , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Heparin/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/therapy , Retrospective Studies
17.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 33(3): 262-273, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess survival outcomes with the intervention of an interprofessional mobilization program for patients with COVID-19 who were receiving venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). DESIGN: Preintervention and postintervention retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Survival outcomes of nonmobilized, adult patients (n = 16) with COVID-19 who were receiving VV-ECMO (May 2020 through December 2020) were compared with those of 26 patients who received a mobility care plan (January 2021 through November 2021). In the preintervention group, full sedation and paralysis were used. In the postintervention group, an early mobilization strategy involving interprofessional collaboration was introduced. RESULTS: The postintervention group had improved survival (73.1% vs 43.8%; P < .04); fewer days of receiving paralytics, fentanyl, and midazolam (P < .01 for all); but more days of dexmedetomidine, morphine, and ketamine administration (P < .01 for all). Concomitantly, more patients in the postintervention cohort received oral or transdermal analgesics, oral anxiolytics, and oral antipsychotics (P < .01 for all), and also required more VV-ECMO cannula adjustments (P = .03). CONCLUSION: Early mobilization of patients with COVID-19 who were receiving VV-ECMO improved survival rates but led to more cannula adjustments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Adult , Analgesics , COVID-19/therapy , Fentanyl , Humans , Retrospective Studies
18.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 33(3): 247-252, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024641

ABSTRACT

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is emerging as a vital resource for survival of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome related to COVID-19. Although recent research provides much insight into the advantages of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in this patient population, little has been published on its use in pregnancy. This case study describes the use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a young pregnant woman with acute respiratory distress syndrome due to COVID-19. It illustrates the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to this treatment modality, allowing time for a fetus to become viable while preserving the life of the mother. In this case, the mother was able to return home after receiving this therapy and resume normal activities of daily living independently.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
20.
Int J Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1006-1012, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020840

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The ProtekDuo with oxygenator mimics veno-venous (V-V) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in veno-pulmonary (V-P) configuration. We have recently developed a new configuration by utilizing a 25 Fr multistage femoral venous drainage cannula and by returning oxygenated blood through both lumina of the double lumen ProtekDuo cannula (V-VP configuration), thereby creating partial right ventricular bypass and oxygenated blood flow of up to seven LPM. We investigated our experience with V-P and V-VP ECMO in patients suffering from COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: Single center, retrospective observational study. RESULTS: Of nine patients, one was initiated on V-A, two on V-P, and six on V-V ECMO. All patients were reconfigured to V-P and five patients in addition had V-VP ECMO configuration. All patients had at least one and up to three circuit exchanges. Patients were on ECMO support between 20 and 122 (55 ± 29) days, were in ICU between 46 and 161 (78 ± 40) days with a total hospital length of stay between 35 and 171 (82 ± 42) days. Six of nine (67%) patients could successfully be weaned off ECMO, survived, and were discharged. CONCLUSION: The ProtekDuo cannula in V-P configuration provides ECMO blood flow while reducing RV flow, wall-stress and dilatation, as well as oxygen consumption. The V-VP configuration is useful to provide high blood flows of up to seven LPM of oxygenated blood, and partial RV support without over-circulating the pulmonary vascular bed. Our results show that V-P and V-VP ECMO configurations are feasible, have good outcome and are without complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Cannula , Catheterization
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