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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264976, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731603

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on ophthalmic outpatient numbers and ophthalmic diagnosis distribution in a community hospital (Taipei City Hospital Zhongxiao Branch) in Taiwan. The COVID-19 pandemic period in Taiwan was defined as May 1 to July 31, 2021. Demographic data, including age, gender, and top 10 diagnoses from ophthalmic outpatients during this period, were collected. A corresponding control group from the same time in 2020 was also collected. The distribution of different diagnoses was analyzed, and the data of 10 most prominent diagnoses with decreased percentage of case numbers during the COVID-19 pandemic period were obtained. The number of cases during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased by 46.9% compared to the control group. The top three most common diagnoses were dry eye syndrome, glaucoma, and macular diseases. The 10 most prominent diagnoses with decreased number of cases during the COVID-19 pandemic were cataract, refraction & accommodation, macular degeneration, conjunctivitis, retinal detachment, vitreous body disorders, ophthalmic complications of diabetes mellitus, glaucoma, dry eye, and retinal vein occlusion. Identifying and treating these patients as scheduled may yield the highest cost-benefit effect in preventing visual loss during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Cataract/diagnosis , Cataract/epidemiology , Dry Eye Syndromes/diagnosis , Dry Eye Syndromes/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Female , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Taiwan/epidemiology
2.
Iran J Med Sci ; 47(1): 2-14, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1727330

ABSTRACT

Background: There are reports of ocular tropism due to respiratory viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Various studies have shown ocular manifestation in coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients. We aimed to identify ophthalmic manifestations in COVID-19 patients and establish an association between ocular symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: A systematic search of Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane Library was conducted for publications from December 2019 to April 2021. The search included MeSH terms such as SARS-CoV-2 and ocular manifestations. The pooled prevalence estimate (PPE) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using binomial distribution and random effects. The meta-regression method was used to examine factors affecting heterogeneity between studies. Results: Of the 412 retrieved articles, 23 studies with a total of 3,650 COVID-19 patients were analyzed. The PPE for any ocular manifestations was 23.77% (95% CI: 15.73-31.81). The most prevalent symptom was dry eyes with a PPE of 13.66% (95% CI: 5.01-25.51). The PPE with 95% CI for conjunctival hyperemia, conjunctival congestion/conjunctivitis, and ocular pain was 13.41% (4.65-25.51), 9.14% (6.13-12.15), and 10.34% (4.90-15.78), respectively. Only two studies reported ocular discomfort and diplopia. The results of meta-regression analysis showed that age and sample size had no significant effect on the prevalence of any ocular manifestations. There was no significant publication bias in our meta-analysis. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of ocular manifestations in COVID-19 patients. The most common symptoms are dry eyes, conjunctival hyperemia, conjunctival congestion/conjunctivitis, ocular pain, irritation/itching/burning sensation, and foreign body sensation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eye Diseases , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/virology , Humans , Prevalence
3.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 106(2): 566-570, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726466

ABSTRACT

There has been a surge of rhino-orbital mucormycosis cases in India in the wake of the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been widely suggested that dysglycemia resulting from diabetes which is a common comorbidity in COVID-19 patients, and indiscriminate steroid use has resulted in this surge. We report a series of 13 cases of rhino-orbital mucormycosis in COVID-19 patients admitted to our center between mid-April and early June 2021. The cases showed a male preponderance, two patients had loss of vision, and four of them showed intracranial extension of disease. Twelve patients had received steroids and 12 had preexisting or newly diagnosed diabetes, both steroid use and diabetes being the most common identified risk factors. Considering other possible risk factors, immunosuppressed state, antiviral or ayurvedic (Indian traditional) medications, and oxygen therapy were not associated with a definite risk of mucormycosis, because they were not present uniformly in the patients. We propose that COVID-19 itself, through molecular mechanisms, predisposes to mucormycosis, with other factors such as dysglycemia or steroid use increasing the risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Fungal/virology , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/virology , Adult , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/drug therapy , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/virology , Eye Infections, Fungal/drug therapy , Eye Infections, Fungal/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/mortality , Risk Factors , Steroids/therapeutic use
4.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 44: 102191, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608937

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the accumulating evidence of ocular manifestations of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), the study aimed to systematically summarize the ocular manifestations in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science databases were searched through June 2021. Studies that provided clinical characteristics and outcomes and reported on the ocular manifestations or conjunctival swab RT-PCR tests among COVID-19 patients were included. RESULTS: A total of 30 studies involving 5,717 patients were identified. Ocular manifestations including conjunctival hyperemia (7.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-8.9%), conjunctival discharge (4.8%, 95% CI 1.8-8.9%), epiphora (6.9%, 95% CI 2.8-12.8%), and foreign body sensation (6.9%, 95% CI 2.4-13.0%) were observed. The positive rate of conjunctival swab tests was 3.9% (95% CI 0.2-6.4%). Severe cases of COVID-19 were associated with an increased risk of developing ocular complications (odds ratio [OR] = 2.77, 95% CI 1.75-4.40). CONCLUSIONS: Despite their relatively low incidence rate in COVID-19 patients, ocular manifestations may be non-specific and present as the initial symptoms of infection. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the conjunctival swabs implicates the eye as a potential source of infection. Early diagnosis and proper eye protection would help prevent viral transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eye Diseases , Eye , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/etiology , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 217, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the volume and the characteristics of pediatric eye emergency department (PEED) consultations performed at our tertiary eye center during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic and we compared them to those carried out in the same time interval of the previous three years. METHODS: Ophthalmic emergency examinations of patients aged ≤18 years old and done during the national COVID-19 lockdown (March 9th, 2020 - May 3rd, 2020) and in the corresponding date range of the previous three years (2017, 2018, and 2019) have been considered and reviewed. The following features were retrieved and analyzed: age, gender, duration and type of accused symptoms, traumatic etiology, and the discharge diagnosis. RESULTS: 136, 133, and 154 PEED visits have been performed respectively in 2017, 2018, and 2019, while 29 patients presented in 2020. Therefore, the volume of PEED activity decreased by 79.4% (p < 0.0001). Demographical and clinical characteristics were comparable to those of the pre-COVID period. Despite the absolute reduction in the number of traumas, urgent conditions increased significantly from 30.7 to 50.7% (p = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS: PEED activity decreased consistently after the onset of the pandemic and it was mainly attended by those children whose conditions required prompt assistance, reducing the number of patients diagnosed with milder pathologies. At the end of the emergency, better use of PEED could avoid overcrowding and minimize waste, allowing resource optimization for the management of urgent cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Age Factors , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Emergencies , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/therapy , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies
7.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 41(3): 356-361, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has transformed health care. With the need to limit COVID-19 exposures, telemedicine has become an increasingly important format for clinical care. Compared with other fields, neuro-ophthalmology faces unique challenges, given its dependence on physical examination signs that are difficult to elicit outside the office setting. As such, it is imperative to understand both patient and provider experiences to continue to adapt the technology and tailor its application. The purpose of this study is to analyze both neuro-ophthalmology physician and patient satisfaction with virtual health visits during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Across three institutions (NYU Langone Health, Indiana University Health, and Columbia University Medical Center), telemedicine surveys were administered to 159 patients. Neuro-ophthalmologists completed 157 surveys; each of these were linked to a single patient visit. Patient surveys consisted of 5 questions regarding visit preparation, satisfaction, challenges, and comfort. The physician survey included 4 questions that focused on ability to gather specific clinical information by history and examination. RESULTS: Among 159 patients, 104 (65.4%) reported that they were satisfied with the visit, and 149 (93.7%) indicated that they were comfortable asking questions. Sixty-eight (73.9%) patients found the instructions provided before the visit easy to understand. Potential areas for improvement noted by patients included more detailed preparation instructions and better technology (phone positioning, Internet connection, and software). More than 87% (137/157) of neuro-ophthalmologists surveyed reported having performed an examination that provided enough information for medical decision-making. Some areas of the neuro-ophthalmologic examination were reported to be easy to conduct (range of eye movements, visual acuity, Amsler grids, Ishihara color plates, and pupillary examination). Other components were more difficult (saccades, red desaturation, visual fields, convergence, oscillations, ocular alignment, and smooth pursuit); some were especially challenging (vestibulo-ocular reflex [VOR], VOR suppression, and optokinetic nystagmus). Clinicians noted that virtual health visits were limited by patient preparation, inability to perform certain parts of the examination (funduscopy and pupils), and technological issues. CONCLUSIONS: Among virtual neuro-ophthalmology visits evaluated, most offer patients with appointments that satisfy their needs. Most physicians in this cohort obtained adequate clinical information for decision-making. Even better technology and instructions may help improve aspects of virtual health visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Ophthalmology/methods , Pandemics , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies
8.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 41(3): 362-367, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) has significantly changed medical practice in the United States, including an increase in the utilization of telemedicine. Here, we characterize change in neuro-ophthalmic care delivery during the early COVID-19 PHE, including a comparison of care delivered via telemedicine and in office. METHODS: Neuro-ophthalmology outpatient encounters from 3 practices in the United States (4 providers) were studied during the early COVID-19 PHE (March 15, 2020-June 15, 2020) and during the same dates 1 year prior. For unique patient visits, patient demographics, visit types, visit format, and diagnosis were compared between years and between synchronous telehealth and in-office formats for 2020. RESULTS: There were 1,276 encounters for 1,167 patients. There were 30% fewer unique patient visits in 2020 vs 2019 (477 vs 670) and 55% fewer in-office visits (299 vs 670). Compared with 2019, encounters in 2020 were more likely to be established, to occur via telemedicine and to relate to an efferent diagnosis. In 2020, synchronous telehealth visits were more likely to be established compared with in-office encounters. CONCLUSIONS: In the practices studied, a lower volume of neuro-ophthalmic care was delivered during the early COVID-19 public health emergency than in the same period in 2019. The type of care shifted toward established patients with efferent diagnoses and the modality of care shifted toward telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Neurology/organization & administration , Office Visits/trends , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11085, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246390

ABSTRACT

To describe the medium-term ophthalmological findings in patients recovering from COVID-19. Patients recovered from the acute phase of COVID-19 underwent a complete ophthalmological evaluation, including presenting and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), refractometry, biomicroscopy, tonometry, break-up time and Schirmer tests, indirect ophthalmoscopy, color fundus picture, and retinal architecture evaluation using optical coherence tomography. Socio-demographic data and personal medical history were also collected. According to the severity of systemic manifestations, patients were classified into mild-to-moderate, severe, and critical. Sixty-four patients (128 eyes) were evaluated 82 ± 36.4 days after the onset of COVID's symptoms. The mean ± SD duration of hospitalization was 15.0 ± 10.7 days. Seven patients (10.9%) had mild-to-moderate, 33 (51.5%) severe, and 24 (37.5%) critical disease. Median [interquartile ranges (IQR)] presenting visual acuity was 0.1 (0-0.2) and BCVA 0 (0-0.1). Anterior segment biomicroscopy was unremarkable, except for dry eye disease, verified in 10.9% of them. The mean ± SD intraocular pressure (IOP) in critical group (14.16 ± 1.88 mmHg) was significantly higher than in severe group (12.51 ± 2.40 mmHg), both in the right (p 0.02) and left eyes (p 0.038). Among all, 15.6% had diabetic retinopathy, and two patients presented with discrete white-yellowish dots in the posterior pole, leading to hyporreflective changes at retinal pigment epithelium level, outer segment, and ellipsoid layers. The present study identified higher IOP among critical cases, when compared to severe cases, and discrete outer retina changes 80 days after COVID-19 infection. No sign of uveitis was found.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Retinopathy/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Disease Progression , Humans , Intraocular Pressure , Middle Aged , Ophthalmoscopy , Retrospective Studies , Survivors , Visual Acuity
12.
Clin Exp Optom ; 104(6): 711-716, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238095

ABSTRACT

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Following the COVID-19 lockdown, uptake of slitlamp-enabled live teleophthalmology increased. Its use contributed to a reduction of referrals escalated to secondary care during-lockdown (avoided: 64% pre-lockdown vs 86% during-lockdown). BACKGROUND: Live teleophthalmology using video conferencing allows real-time, three-way consultation between secondary care, community providers and patients, improving interpretation of slit lamp findings and potentially reducing referrals to secondary care. NHS Forth Valley implemented live teleophthalmology in March 2019. In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic created urgency to deliver ophthalmic care while minimising the risk of contracting or spreading the disease. We aim to compare the uptake and two outcomes (number of avoided secondary care referrals; pattern of presenting conditions) of live teleophthalmology consultations in NHS Forth Valley before and during the COVID-19 national lockdown. METHODS: An NHS secure video conferencing platform connected the video slit lamps of optometrists, or an iPad mounted on a slit lamp and viewing through the eyepieces, to a secondary care ophthalmologist via a virtual live clinic/waiting area. Data about avoiding a secondary care referral were extracted from a post-consultation ophthalmologist survey for 14 months of data. Pre- and during-lockdown intervals were before/after 23 March 2020, when routine eyecare appointments were suspended. Numbers of avoided referrals to secondary care and patterns of presenting conditions were compared for pre- and during-lockdown periods. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic markedly increased use of live teleophthalmology in NHS Forth Valley. Surveys were completed for 164 of 250 (66%) teleophthalmology consultations over the study period. Data from 154 surveys were analysed, 78 and 76 for the pre- and during-lockdown periods, respectively. Significantly more during-lockdown (86%) than pre-lockdown (64%; difference 21%, 95% CI 8-34%, p = 0.001) surveys indicated that referrals to secondary care were avoided. CONCLUSION: Survey data from ophthalmologists suggest significantly fewer escalations to secondary care due to teleophthalmology use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/methods , Quarantine , Referral and Consultation/trends , Secondary Care/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Clin Exp Optom ; 104(3): 267-284, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152981

ABSTRACT

Optometry Australia's infection control guidelines 2020 deliver a revision of the paper: Infection control guidelines for optometrists 2016. A review of recent literature was undertaken, with information collected from peer-reviewed journal articles, guidelines from professional societies, government health departments and instructions from equipment manufacturers. This information was used to provide an update on current infection control best practice. The guidelines are presented in two sections: standard precautions and transmission-based precautions. The standard (routine) precautions section covers: hand hygiene; personal protective equipment; safe handling and disposal of sharps; routine environmental cleaning; reprocessing of reusable equipment, instruments and contact lenses; respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette; aseptic and clean technique; and waste management. The transmission-based precautions section covers considerations for optometry staff and/or patients when standard precautions alone may not be sufficient to prevent the spread of an infectious agent; particularly relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, a comprehensive list of disinfection or sterilisation techniques to use on reusable devices, instruments or equipment in optometric practice is provided in an Appendix.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Guidelines as Topic , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics , Australia/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Optometry
16.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(11): 2391-2395, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116804

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the impact of 2019 COVID-19 pandemic, national lockdown, and unlocking on ophthalmic care provided by the government-funded apex health institute of India. METHODS: Retrospective review of electronic medical records of all patients presenting to the ophthalmology department from March 23, 2020, to July 15, 2020, was compared with that from March 23, 2019, to July 15, 2019. The data between March 23, 2020, to May 31, 2020 (lockdown) and June 06, 2020, to July 15, 2020 (unlock) was compared separately. Parameters evaluated were age, gender, presenting complaints, final diagnosis, treatment advised, and surgical interventions. RESULTS: During the lockdown, routine outpatient flow reduced by 97.14% (P < 0.001), the median age of presentation decreased to 29 years (55 years last year) and males increased by 4.7% (from 61.51% to 66.21%) in 2020. Emergency services decreased by 35.25%, percentage of children decreased by 4.28% (from 34.28% to 30%) and males increased by 13.53% (from 59.97% to 73.5%). Mechanical trauma, microbial keratitis, and conjunctivitis were the most common reasons for presentation. The former lessened by 41.75% while the latter two amplified by 1.25 times and 2 times, respectively. While sanitizer-associated chemical injury increased in proportion, endophthalmitis, and postoperative complications declined. The number of donor corneas collected and emergency therapeutic keratoplasties performed decreased by 99.61% and 92.39%, respectively (P < 0.001). During the unlocking phase, routine patient consultations were 71 ± 19/day, significantly lower than 978 ± 109/day of last year (P < 0.001). No voluntary eye donation was reported during this period. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic and national lockdown severely hampered the delivery of ophthalmic care by the apex-ophthalmic institute. Unlike anticipated, lifting of pandemic-associated lockdown served only minimally in improving patient inflow in its initial phases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Eye Banks/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmology/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data
17.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 30(1): S32-S34, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112946

ABSTRACT

Ophthalmology is a specialty which involves close contact with patients. Personal protective equipment (PPE) along with modifications in examination techniques and equipment are needed to avoid spread of coronavirus infectious disease (COVID-19) to health professionals. This communication aims to highlight and critically analyse the measures suggested to control this spread. We also highlighted our experience with protective gear modifications. As with any practice, triage is cornerstone. Use of disinfectants, good personal hygiene practices and PPE for patients and staff, must be adopted for safe ophthalmology practices. Key Words: COVID-19, Ophthalmology, Personal protective equipment (PPE).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Ophthalmology/methods , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/transmission , Comorbidity , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data
18.
Semin Ophthalmol ; 36(7): 461-468, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109026

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To examine the uptake, results, and patient assessment of virtual inpatient ophthalmology consultations at our academic medical center during the COVID-19 pandemic.Design: Retrospective review, pre and post COVID analysis, and teleophthalmology patient survey in the inpatient and emergency setting.Participants: Adult patients at our medical center for whom ophthalmology consultation was requested from February 24 through April 19, 2020.Methods: Patient encounters were retrieved and coded for all inpatient and emergency room ophthalmology consultations over a 4-week period before and a 4-week period after our department first offered virtual ophthalmology consultations. Theseconsultations took place over real-time video, audio, or photography between the on-call ophthalmologist and the patient and/or patient's primary physician. A four-item questionnaire was offered to patients who completed a virtual consultation.Main Outcome Measures: Virtual consultation diagnoses and management outcomes; patient assessment of virtual inpatient and emergent ophthalmic care.Results: Of all 423 included encounters, 258 (61%) occurred during the 4 weeks before offering virtual consultations and 165 (39%) encounters occurred during the subsequent 4-week period, indicating a 36% decrease in ophthalmology consultations over this pandemic period. A total of 120 (28%) encounters were conducted remotely during the 8-week period. In-person emergency department (ED) encounters (as percent of total encounters) decreased from 60% to 36% (p < .01) between the first and eighth weeks of the study period. In the 4 weeks since their implementation, virtual inpatient ophthalmology consultations were utilized in 34 of 165 (21%) consultations. Of those, 20 (59%) were high acuity and 1 (3%) was escalated to the ED for in-person evaluation. Most common management decisions made included medication prescription in 46 (55%) patients and scheduling follow-up for 44 (30%) patients. In a survey administered to all 120 patients who were managed over phone or video, 56 (47%) responded. Respondents were in general agreement (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92) and expressed satisfaction with phone and virtual encounters. Specifically, 42 (49%) of 86 patients who had phone encounters noted a mean weighted satisfaction score of 4.6 out of 5 and 14 (41%) responders of 34 virtual consultation encounters noted a mean weighted satisfaction score of 4.9 out of 5. The difference between the average weighted satisfaction scores favored virtual consultation over telephone encounters (p < .01).Conclusions: Virtual inpatient ophthalmology consultations are feasible and have reported high patient satisfaction. Implementing video-based technologies to deliver high-acuity ophthalmic triage and management may help to promote patient and provider safety. In our experience, patients favored virtual consultation over telephone encounters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Inpatients , Ophthalmology/methods , Patient Satisfaction , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(3): 701-705, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089038

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the changing trends in terms of patient load, presenting complaints, surgical procedures and resource utilization in a multispeciality tertiary care hospital after lockdown due to COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective.data were collected from Ophthalmology in-patient and emergency services of a government medical college and multispecialty tertiary care hospital in North India. Data pertaining to patient census, presenting complaints, surgical procedures and resource consumption were compared in the 6-month period (March 25 to September 30, 2020) following national lockdown and subsequent gradual unlock to data of same time period last year. RESULTS: A total of 1152 new patients visited Ophthalmology emergency service, whereas 324 sought tele-ophthalmology consultation.Majority were males (61.8%, n = 712), whereas average age of presentation was 34 ± 7.2 years. The number.of patients seeking emergency ophthalmic care reduced by 23.9% in the current year, in-patient record reduced by 96.53% and number of surgeries reduced by 98.13%. Tele-ophthalmology services comprised 21.95% of the total patient load. Use of triple layered surgical masks increased by 85.7%, use of disposable gloves increased by 89.5% but interestingly the availability of chlorhexidine hand rub fell by 15.9%, in the current year compared to last year. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown have reduced the number of patients visiting tertiary health care facility for ophthalmic care. As manpower and resource consumption has increased, smart management is needed to tackle the current scenario efficiently. Tele-ophthalmology must be promoted and we must understand the changing trends to plan for the future accordingly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/trends , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Comorbidity , Emergencies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
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