Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Adv Healthc Mater ; 11(14): e2200283, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1843840

ABSTRACT

The eye is susceptible to viral infections, causing severe ocular symptoms or even respiratory diseases. Methods capable of protecting the eye from external viral invasion in a long-term and highly effective way are urgently needed but have been proved to be extremely challenging. Here, a strategy of forming a long-acting protective ocular surface is described by instilling adhesive dual-antiviral nanoparticles. Taking pseudotyped severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as a model virus, antiviral agent-loaded nanoparticles are coated with a "double-lock" hybrid cell membrane abundant with integrin-ß1 and angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2). After instillation, the presence of integrin-ß1 endows coated nanoparticles with steady adhesion via specific binding to Arg-Gly-Asp sequence on the fibronectin of ocular epithelium, achieving durable retention on the ocular surface. In addition to loaded inhibitors, the exposure of ACE2 can trap SARS-CoV-2 and subsequently neutralize the associated spike protein, playing a dual antiviral effect of the resulting nanoparticles. Adhesive dual-antiviral nanoparticles enabled by coating with a "double-lock" hybrid cell membrane could be a versatile platform for topical long-acting protection against viral infection of the eye.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 , Eye Diseases , Eye , Nanoparticles , Adhesives/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Eye/drug effects , Eye/virology , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Eye Diseases/virology , Humans , Integrins , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Zhonghua Yan Ke Za Zhi ; 58(3): 176-181, 2022 Mar 11.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742776

ABSTRACT

Accumulated evidence has shown that novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could contribute to eye disease during its pandemic, which is called COVID-19 eye disease. Currently, there is a lack of uniform and standardized guidelines for the protection of medical staff in the diagnosis and treatment process. Most ophthalmologists treat this disease according to their clinical experience. Therefore, the experts of the Public Health Ophthalmology Branch of Chinese Preventive Medicine Association have developed this consensus statement after thorough discussions, hoping to provide guiding opinions on the further prevention and control of COVID-19 eye disease in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eye Diseases , China/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 22: e210156, 2022. graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1677609

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Over the past year and a half dental education has been conducted primarily online due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. During the pandemic, we have spent many hours a day on our computers, mobile phones, and tablets to gather information and participate in online seminars and classrooms. Health consequences resulting from the overuse of these devices include carpal tunnel syndrome as well as computer vision syndrome (CVS). Computer vision syndrome, also known as digital eye strain, has several associated features such as eye burning, strained vision, dry eye, blurred vision, and associated neck and shoulder pain. Several predisposing factors have been linked with CVS, but often this problem gets ignored. The management of this syndrome is aimed at educating dentists on computer use, position, and the surrounding environment. Considering all this, we must ensure that we spend some time away from these devices every day to avoid any significant vision problems. The objective of preparing this manuscript was to provide a brief overview of the increased prevalence of computer vision syndrome and its associated features.


Subject(s)
Vision Disorders/prevention & control , Artificial Intelligence , Dentists , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , Microcomputers , Carpal Tunnel Syndrome , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Education, Dental , Screen Time , India
4.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 63(1): e1-e3, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296012

ABSTRACT

The use of hand sanitisers is common practice to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the safety thereof requires consideration as this may be hazardous in children. Recent studies have shown that the misuse and increased unsupervised availability of alcohol-based hand sanitisers may result in adverse events in children such as skin irritation, dryness, cracking and peeling. Unintentional or intentional ingestion of hand sanitisers in children under the age of 12 years may occur because of the colour, smell and flavour added to it. Consumption of alcohol in children may result in hypoglycaemia, apnoea and acidosis. This allows the invasion of other bacterial and viral infections. Children may also rub their eyes with sanitised hands and cause ocular injury. Therefore, the use of hand sanitisers in general needs to be revised in both children and adults. Other interventions on lowering the risk of adverse events because of misuse of hand sanitiser should be practised more often. These include promoting washing of hands over sanitisers where possible, training children on how to use hand sanitisers and creating awareness of the dangers if ingested or in contact with the eyes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Hand Sanitizers , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child Health , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Drug Misuse/adverse effects , Drug Misuse/prevention & control , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/diagnosis , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/prevention & control , Eye Diseases/chemically induced , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Hand Disinfection/methods , Hand Sanitizers/pharmacology , Hand Sanitizers/toxicity , Humans , Risk Adjustment/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Skin Diseases/chemically induced , Skin Diseases/prevention & control
5.
Ann Ig ; 33(6): 615-627, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) made imperative the use of protective devices as a source control tool. As there is no definite antiviral treatment and effective vaccine, the only efficient means of protecting and mitigating infectious contagion has been the use of personal protective equipment, especially by healthcare workers. However, masks affect the humidification process of inhaled air, possibly leading to a basal inflammatory state of the upper airways. STUDY DESIGN: This is a single-center observational study conducted at the University Hospital of Catania from April 1, 2020, to June 31, 2020. METHODS: We analyzed the role of protective masks on the elimination of upper airways complaints in healthcare workers of the University Hospital of Catania. We evaluated 277 subjects through a self-administered 17 item questionnaire based on respiratory, work performance and health-related quality of life domains. RESULTS: A higher prevalence of nasal and ocular symptoms, perceived reduced work performance, difficulty in concentrating, and sleep disorders were found. After two weeks adhering to a list of good practices that we recommended, significant reversibility of the symptoms investigated and work performance enhancement were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Despite clinical complaints related to personal protective equipment, effective amelioration through usage rules is easily obtained. Given the essential use of protective masks, healthcare workers have to adhere to appropriate work and safety prevention rules.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Masks/adverse effects , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Quality of Life , Work Performance , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Eye Diseases/etiology , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Female , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/prevention & control , Male , Masks/standards , Middle Aged , Nose Diseases/etiology , Nose Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 31(5): 403-415, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692439

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To compile and report the ocular manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and summarize the ocular side effects of investigational treatments of this disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Conjunctivitis is by far the most common ocular manifestation of COVID-19 with viral particles being isolated from tears/secretions of infected individuals. Multiple therapeutic options are being explored across a variety of medication classes with diverse ocular side effects. SUMMARY: Eye care professionals must exercise caution, as conjunctivitis may be the presenting or sole finding of an active COVID-19 infection. While no currently studied therapeutic agents have been found to reliably treat COVID-19, early vaccination trials are progressing and show promise. A video abstract is available for a more detailed summary. VIDEO ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/COOP/A36.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Conjunctivitis, Viral/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Drugs, Investigational/adverse effects , Eye Diseases/chemically induced , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Tears/virology , COVID-19 , Conjunctivitis, Viral/drug therapy , Conjunctivitis, Viral/virology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/prevention & control , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 81(6): 1-10, 2020 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614927

ABSTRACT

Ocular complications in critical care patients are common. There has been a surge in intensive care admissions following the COVID-19 outbreak. The management of COVID-19 exposes patients to a number of specific risk factors for developing ocular complications, which include non-invasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation and prone positioning. Consequently, it is likely that there will be an increase in the number of ocular complications secondary to the management of COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit setting, and these complications could lead to permanent visual loss and blindness. Increased awareness of eye care in the intensive care unit setting is therefore vital to help prevent visual loss and maintain quality of life for patients recovering from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Eye Diseases/therapy , Intensive Care Units , Ophthalmology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Referral and Consultation , Acute Disease , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Conjunctival Diseases/prevention & control , Conjunctival Diseases/therapy , Conjunctivitis/prevention & control , Conjunctivitis/therapy , Corneal Diseases/prevention & control , Corneal Diseases/therapy , Corneal Injuries/prevention & control , Corneal Injuries/therapy , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Edema/prevention & control , Edema/therapy , Endophthalmitis/prevention & control , Endophthalmitis/therapy , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Glaucoma/diagnosis , Glaucoma/therapy , Humans , Keratitis/prevention & control , Keratitis/therapy , Lubricants/therapeutic use , Ointments/therapeutic use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders/diagnosis , Vision Disorders/therapy
9.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 27(2): 165-170, 2020 Jun 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614682

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2) is a coronavirus that causes COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) with mild to severe respiratory illness. It is a highly contagious disease transmitted through direct or indirect contact with infected people or contaminated surfaces, mainly through respiratory droplets, but other routes are being investigated. OBJECTIVE: It is known that coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause a variety of ocular pathologies in animals, including conjunctivitis, anterior uveitis, retinitis, and optic neuritis, many of which are severe. However, there is no evidence of the SARS-CoV-2 presence in the eye tissue of asymptomatic patients, even if the symptomatic incidence is low. This systematic review presents updated literature on this issue. ABBREVIATED DESCRIPTION OF THE STATE OF KNOWLEDGE: COVID-19 has now spread throughout the continents and poses a global threat to public health. The risk of rapidly overloading health care systems and causing substantial mortality worldwide is real. On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced coronavirus as a global pandemic. Several studies described a few cases with initial ocular symptoms followed by systemic symptoms of the disease. SUMMARY: Although the frequency of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 infection through the eye is low, ocular symptoms are not uncommon in COVID-19. In some cases, eye symptoms may be the first signs of illness. This implies the need for hygienic recommendations and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for medical staff and other services to minimize COVID-19 infection of both health-care workers and patients. A triage for ophthalmic outpatient clinic is mandatory.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Eye Diseases/etiology , Eye Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Eye Diseases/pathology , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
10.
In Vivo ; 34(3 Suppl): 1619-1628, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-529160

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in China in the city of Wuhan in December of 2019 and since then more than 5,000,000 people have been infected, with approximately 338,000 deaths worldwide. The virus causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is characterized by fever, myalgia and cough, with severe acute respiratory syndrome being the most fearsome complication. Nevertheless, the vast majority of cases present mild symptoms or none. Central nervous system and cardiovascular manifestations have been reported. The range of ocular manifestations, either as a result of the infection or as a result of the treatment, has not yet been discussed. In this study, a systematic review of current literature relevant to COVID-19 was performed with focus on modes of transmission, ocular manifestations related to infection and medications, as well as the control of infection in ophthalmic practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Eye Diseases/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Abducens Nerve Diseases/etiology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Biomarkers , COVID-19 , China , Conjunctival Diseases/blood , Conjunctival Diseases/etiology , Contact Lenses/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Equipment Contamination , Eye Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Hyperemia/blood , Hyperemia/etiology , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Keratoconjunctivitis/etiology , Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases/blood , Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases/etiology , Leukocyte Count , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retinal Diseases/chemically induced , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL