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1.
Nutrients ; 14(10)2022 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847391

ABSTRACT

Background: Retrospective research on real-world data provides the ability to gain evidence on specific topics especially when running across different sites in research networks. Those research networks have become increasingly relevant in recent years; not least due to the special situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. An important requirement for those networks is the data harmonization by ensuring the semantic interoperability. Aims: In this paper we demonstrate (1) how to facilitate digital infrastructures to run a retrospective study in a research network spread across university and non-university hospital sites; and (2) to answer a medical question on COVID-19 related change in diagnostic counts for diabetes-related eye diseases. Materials and methods: The study is retrospective and non-interventional and runs on medical case data documented in routine care at the participating sites. The technical infrastructure consists of the OMOP CDM and other OHDSI tools that is provided in a transferable format. An ETL process to transfer and harmonize the data to the OMOP CDM has been utilized. Cohort definitions for each year in observation have been created centrally and applied locally against medical case data of all participating sites and analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results: The analyses showed an expectable drop of the total number of diagnoses and the diagnoses for diabetes in general; whereas the number of diagnoses for diabetes-related eye diseases surprisingly decreased stronger compared to non-eye diseases. Differences in relative changes of diagnoses counts between sites show an urgent need to process multi-centric studies rather than single-site studies to reduce bias in the data. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the ability to utilize an existing portable and standardized infrastructure and ETL process from a university hospital setting and transfer it to non-university sites. From a medical perspective further activity is needed to evaluate data quality of the utilized real-world data documented in routine care and to investigate its eligibility of this data for research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Eye Diseases , COVID-19/diagnosis , Databases, Factual , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Disease Management , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
2.
J Ocul Pharmacol Ther ; 37(7): 383-385, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821676
3.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 217, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the volume and the characteristics of pediatric eye emergency department (PEED) consultations performed at our tertiary eye center during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic and we compared them to those carried out in the same time interval of the previous three years. METHODS: Ophthalmic emergency examinations of patients aged ≤18 years old and done during the national COVID-19 lockdown (March 9th, 2020 - May 3rd, 2020) and in the corresponding date range of the previous three years (2017, 2018, and 2019) have been considered and reviewed. The following features were retrieved and analyzed: age, gender, duration and type of accused symptoms, traumatic etiology, and the discharge diagnosis. RESULTS: 136, 133, and 154 PEED visits have been performed respectively in 2017, 2018, and 2019, while 29 patients presented in 2020. Therefore, the volume of PEED activity decreased by 79.4% (p < 0.0001). Demographical and clinical characteristics were comparable to those of the pre-COVID period. Despite the absolute reduction in the number of traumas, urgent conditions increased significantly from 30.7 to 50.7% (p = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS: PEED activity decreased consistently after the onset of the pandemic and it was mainly attended by those children whose conditions required prompt assistance, reducing the number of patients diagnosed with milder pathologies. At the end of the emergency, better use of PEED could avoid overcrowding and minimize waste, allowing resource optimization for the management of urgent cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Age Factors , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Emergencies , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/therapy , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies
4.
Workplace Health Saf ; 69(8): 352-358, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eye health has garnered increased attention since the COVID-19 pandemic. This Round Table explored the impact mask wearing, delays in eye examinations, and increased screen time have on vision and ultimately the worker. METHODS: Leading experts in the areas of occupational health, risk management, eye health, and communication were identified and invited to participate in a Round Table discussion. Questions posed to experts were based on literature that addressed eye health, such as mask wearing, communication and managing expectations when accessing professional eye health appointments, and increased screen time. FINDINGS: Experts agreed that eye health considerations must be in place. These considerations should address not only clinical care of the patient but ways to protect workers from occupational injury associated with the eye. CONCLUSION/APPLICATION TO PRACTICE: The occupational health professional is a key resource for assessment and training that pertains to eye health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Eye Diseases/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Interior Design and Furnishings/standards , Occupational Health/standards , Occupational Injuries/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
5.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol ; 21(5): 500-506, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315705

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To analyze if recommendations given before and during the COVID-19 pandemic are still a valid option for patients suffering of ocular allergy (OA). RECENT FINDINGS: During the last year many doctors and patients requested suggestions for the treatment of OA patients in COVID-19 time. Most of them were given by phone calls and emails following the recommendations given by Scientific Societies. SUMMARY: Considering the current multiple problems related to the COVID-19 pandemic, OA has not been considered a priority, even though patients need treatments. Topical antiallergic drugs are still the first option to treat all kind of OA, with the addition of topical corticosteroids in the severe forms of vernal and atopic keratoconjunctivitis (VKC and AKC) even in patients at risk of COVID-19. Topical immunomodulation is still recommended in severe forms of VKC and AKC unless the patient is infected. The number of patients treated with these drugs in our Center was similar than previous years. The risk to have a VKC patient affected by COVID-19 is similar to the general pediatric population but with a lower OR. In 2021, still in COVID-time, the management of OA should follow the previous recommendations with an update due to the risk of infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Conjunctivitis, Allergic/therapy , Pandemics , Conjunctivitis, Allergic/drug therapy , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Hypersensitivity/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic
6.
Clin Exp Optom ; 104(6): 711-716, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238095

ABSTRACT

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Following the COVID-19 lockdown, uptake of slitlamp-enabled live teleophthalmology increased. Its use contributed to a reduction of referrals escalated to secondary care during-lockdown (avoided: 64% pre-lockdown vs 86% during-lockdown). BACKGROUND: Live teleophthalmology using video conferencing allows real-time, three-way consultation between secondary care, community providers and patients, improving interpretation of slit lamp findings and potentially reducing referrals to secondary care. NHS Forth Valley implemented live teleophthalmology in March 2019. In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic created urgency to deliver ophthalmic care while minimising the risk of contracting or spreading the disease. We aim to compare the uptake and two outcomes (number of avoided secondary care referrals; pattern of presenting conditions) of live teleophthalmology consultations in NHS Forth Valley before and during the COVID-19 national lockdown. METHODS: An NHS secure video conferencing platform connected the video slit lamps of optometrists, or an iPad mounted on a slit lamp and viewing through the eyepieces, to a secondary care ophthalmologist via a virtual live clinic/waiting area. Data about avoiding a secondary care referral were extracted from a post-consultation ophthalmologist survey for 14 months of data. Pre- and during-lockdown intervals were before/after 23 March 2020, when routine eyecare appointments were suspended. Numbers of avoided referrals to secondary care and patterns of presenting conditions were compared for pre- and during-lockdown periods. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic markedly increased use of live teleophthalmology in NHS Forth Valley. Surveys were completed for 164 of 250 (66%) teleophthalmology consultations over the study period. Data from 154 surveys were analysed, 78 and 76 for the pre- and during-lockdown periods, respectively. Significantly more during-lockdown (86%) than pre-lockdown (64%; difference 21%, 95% CI 8-34%, p = 0.001) surveys indicated that referrals to secondary care were avoided. CONCLUSION: Survey data from ophthalmologists suggest significantly fewer escalations to secondary care due to teleophthalmology use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/methods , Quarantine , Referral and Consultation/trends , Secondary Care/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Am J Ophthalmol ; 230: 234-242, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210782

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the initial utilization, safety, and patient experience with tele-ophthalmology during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: We conducted a telephone survey and interview of a random sample of patients who received different modalities of care (in-person, telephone, videocall, or visits deferred) during Michigan's shelter-in-place order beginning March 23, 2020. The survey assessed patient safety, patient satisfaction with care, perceptions of telehealth-based eye care, and worry about eyesight. Data were analyzed via frequency measures (eg, means and standard deviations), χ2 tests, ANOVA, and paired t tests. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory. RESULTS: A total of 3,274 patients were called and 1,720 (53%) agreed to participate. In-person participants were significantly older than telephone (P = .002) and videocall visit (P = .001) participants. Significantly more white participants had in-person visits than minority participants (P = .002). In-person visit participants worried about their eyesight more (2.7, standard deviation [SD] = 1.2) than those who had telephone (2.5, SD = 1.3), videocall (2.4, SD = 1.1), or deferred visits (2.4, SD = 1.2) (P = .004). Of all telephone or videocall visits, 1.5% (n = 26) resulted in an in-person visit within 1 day, 2.9% (n = 48) within 2-7 days, and 2.4% (n = 40) within 8-14 days after the virtual visit demonstrating appropriate triage to telemedicine-based care. Patients frequently cited a desire for augmenting the telephone or videocall visits with objective test data. CONCLUSIONS: When appropriately triaged, tele-ophthalmology appears to be a safe way to reduce the volume of in-person visits to promote social distancing in the clinic. A hybrid model of eye care combining ancillary testing with a video or phone visit represents a promising model of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Eye Diseases , Health Care Surveys , Ophthalmology/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Outcome Assessment , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
12.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(6): 2726-2729, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173123

ABSTRACT

This short communication described the actions taken in ophthalmic practice in Kabul, Afghanistan during the COVID-19 pandemic to effectively protect both patients and staff. By following World Health Organisation (WHO), international and local guidelines it has been possible to continue treating ophthalmic outpatients with minimum risk to both patients and staff. The changes which have been implemented may allow better overall infection control in the hospital which will continue to have benefits post-pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Ophthalmology/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Afghanistan/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Eye Diseases/virology , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 139(5): 508-515, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126331

ABSTRACT

Importance: Patient perceptions regarding the risks of obtaining in-person ophthalmic care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may affect adherence to recommended treatment plans and influence visual outcomes. A deeper understanding of patient perspectives will inform strategies to optimize adherence with vision-preserving therapies. Objective: To evaluate perceptions of COVID-19 exposure risk and their association with appointment attendance among patients at high risk of both reversible and irreversible vision loss from lapses in care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study included a nonvalidated telephone survey designed in April and May of 2020 and a retrospective medical record review conducted in parallel with survey administration from May 22 to August 18, 2020. Participants were recruited from 2 tertiary eye care centers (Emory Eye Center in Atlanta, Georgia, and W.K. Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan). The study included a random sample of patients with diagnoses of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or diabetic retinopathy (DR) who received an intravitreal injection between January 6 and March 13, 2020, and were scheduled for a second injection between March 13 and May 6, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Association between perceptions regarding COVID-19 risks and loss to follow-up. Results: Of 1004 eligible patients, 423 (42%) were successfully contacted, and 348 (82%) agreed to participate (participants' mean [SD] age, 75 [12] years; 195 women [56%]; 287 White [82%] patients). Respondents had a mean (SD) of 2.7 (1.1) comorbidities associated with severe COVID-19, and 77 (22%) knew someone with COVID-19. Of all respondents, 163 (47%) were very concerned or moderately concerned about vision loss from missed treatments during the pandemic. Although 208 (60%) believed the COVID-19 virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), exposure at the eye clinic was extremely unlikely or unlikely, 49 (14%) believed it was extremely likely or likely. Seventy-eight participants (22%) were lost to follow-up. Concern regarding COVID-19 exposure during clinic visits (odds ratio [OR], 3.9; 95% CI, 1.8-8.4) and diagnosis of DR (vs AMD) (OR, 8.130; 95% CI, 3.367-20.408) were associated with an increase in likelihood of loss to follow-up. Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients at high risk for vision loss from lapses in care, many expressed concerns regarding the effect of the pandemic on their ability to receive timely care. Survey results suggest that fear of SARS-CoV-2 exposure was associated with a roughly 4-fold increase in the odds of patient loss to follow-up. These results support the potential importance of clearly conveying infection-control measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetic Retinopathy/drug therapy , Eye Diseases/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Macular Degeneration/drug therapy , Ophthalmic Solutions/administration & dosage , Ophthalmology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , Diabetic Retinopathy/diagnosis , Drug Administration Schedule , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Fear , Female , Georgia , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Intravitreal Injections , Macular Degeneration/diagnosis , Male , Michigan , Middle Aged , Patient Compliance , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
14.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(11): 2391-2395, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116804

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the impact of 2019 COVID-19 pandemic, national lockdown, and unlocking on ophthalmic care provided by the government-funded apex health institute of India. METHODS: Retrospective review of electronic medical records of all patients presenting to the ophthalmology department from March 23, 2020, to July 15, 2020, was compared with that from March 23, 2019, to July 15, 2019. The data between March 23, 2020, to May 31, 2020 (lockdown) and June 06, 2020, to July 15, 2020 (unlock) was compared separately. Parameters evaluated were age, gender, presenting complaints, final diagnosis, treatment advised, and surgical interventions. RESULTS: During the lockdown, routine outpatient flow reduced by 97.14% (P < 0.001), the median age of presentation decreased to 29 years (55 years last year) and males increased by 4.7% (from 61.51% to 66.21%) in 2020. Emergency services decreased by 35.25%, percentage of children decreased by 4.28% (from 34.28% to 30%) and males increased by 13.53% (from 59.97% to 73.5%). Mechanical trauma, microbial keratitis, and conjunctivitis were the most common reasons for presentation. The former lessened by 41.75% while the latter two amplified by 1.25 times and 2 times, respectively. While sanitizer-associated chemical injury increased in proportion, endophthalmitis, and postoperative complications declined. The number of donor corneas collected and emergency therapeutic keratoplasties performed decreased by 99.61% and 92.39%, respectively (P < 0.001). During the unlocking phase, routine patient consultations were 71 ± 19/day, significantly lower than 978 ± 109/day of last year (P < 0.001). No voluntary eye donation was reported during this period. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic and national lockdown severely hampered the delivery of ophthalmic care by the apex-ophthalmic institute. Unlike anticipated, lifting of pandemic-associated lockdown served only minimally in improving patient inflow in its initial phases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Eye Banks/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmology/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data
15.
J Fr Ophtalmol ; 44(3): 307-312, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078008

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a freely accessible internet algorithm to correctly identify the need for emergency ophthalmologic consultation for correct diagnosis and management. METHOD: This retrospective observational cohort study was based on the first 100 patients who requested recommendations on the necessity of breaking the lockdown for emergency ophthalmology consultation during the period from March to May 2020. RESULTS: Ninety-one patients completed questionnaires. Forty-nine were directed to emergency consultation and 42 to differed scheduled visits or telemedicine visits. One patient sent for emergency consultation had an overestimated severity and could have been seen later, while two patients initially recommended for a scheduled visit were considered appropriate for emergency consultation. However, these patients' management did not suffer as a consequence of the delay. The sensitivity of the algorithm, defined as the number of emergency consultations suggested by the algorithm divided by the total number of emergency consultations deemed appropriate by the practitioner's final evaluation, was 96.0%. The specificity of the algorithm, defined as the number of patients recommended for delayed consultation by the algorithm divided by the number of patients deemed clinically appropriate for this approach, was 97.5%. The positive predictive value, defined as the number of appropriate emergency consultations divided by the total number of emergency consultations suggested by the algorithm, was 97.9%. Finally, the negative predictive value, defined as the number of appropriately deferred patients divided by the number of deferred patients recommended by the algorithm, was 95.2%. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the reliability of an algorithm based on patients' past medical history and symptoms to classify patients and direct them to either emergency consultation or to a more appropriate deferred, scheduled appointment. This algorithm might allow reduction of walk-in visits by half and thus help control patient flow into ophthalmologic emergency departments.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Eye Diseases/therapy , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Quarantine , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/standards , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Young Adult
16.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245343, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067412

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of teleconsultation in the provision of eye care services during the COVID-19 lockdown. Disparities in the consultation burden of sub-specialities and socio-demographic differences in teleconsultation utilization were also assessed. METHODS: Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital Rawalpindi began audio and video teleconsultation using broadband telecommunication services during the lockdown. Patients' and consultations' data gathered during the first three weeks after the commencement of this programme were compared with data from the four weeks prior to lockdown. The weekly consultation ratio and overall consultation burden of sub-specialities were measured. Chi-Square tests of association determined the relationship between different variables (socioeconomic status and consultation characteristics) and consultation modality (on-site vs online). RESULTS: In total, 17507 on-site consultations (4377/week) were conducted compared to 1431 teleconsultations (477/week), which maintained 10.89% of the weekly pre-lockdown eye care services. The post-lockdown teleconsultation programme saw a relatively higher percentage of service utility among female (47.09% vs 44.71%), younger-age (31.33±19.45 vs 41.25±23.32 years) and higher-socioeconomic-status (32.21% vs 0.30%) patients compared to pre-lockdown on-site consultations. The most common indication for teleconsultation was red-eye (16.70%). While cornea and glaucoma clinics maintained most of the pre-lockdown services (30.42% and 29% respectively), the highest dropout was seen in optometric and vitreoretinal services supporting only 5.54% and 8.28% of pre-lockdown services, respectively. CONCLUSION: Digital initiatives could partially maintain eye care services during the lockdown. Focused strategies to improve teleconsultation utilization are required during the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/therapy , Remote Consultation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Developing Countries , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quarantine , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
17.
R I Med J (2013) ; 104(1): 61-64, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055476

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns on public interest in ophthalmology. METHODS: Search interest data for ophthalmic services and conditions were collected from January 1, 2019 to June 21, 2020. Temporal statistical analysis was used to identify significant trends. Weekly data on ophthalmic services and conditions search interest obtained from Google Trends were analyzed with analysis of variance testing and the generalized linear model based on dates. RESULTS: Ophthalmic services searches decreased after the first COVID-19 case in the country (p<0.001); ophthalmic services and conditions search interest also declined after the first COVID-19 case and lockdown orders in each state (p<0.001). Following the first in-state COVID-19 case, search interest in ophthalmic services fell more than for ophthalmic conditions (p=0.0088). Lockdown and COVID-19 had similar effects on ophthalmic services search interest (p=0.2246), but interest in ophthalmic conditions decreased more after lockdown than after the first in-state case (p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the decrease in search interest in ophthalmic services was associated with COVID-19 rather than lockdown orders, suggesting that public interest in ophthalmic care may be more sensitive to changes in the COVID-19 pandemic than lockdown orders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Information Seeking Behavior , Ophthalmology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Online Systems , Ophthalmology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine
19.
Curr Opin Neurol ; 34(1): 61-66, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033244

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Telemedicine for neuro-ophthalmology (tele-neuro-ophthalmology) has the potential to increase access to neuro-ophthalmic care by improving efficiency and decreasing the need for long-distance travel for patients. Requirements for decreased person-to-person contacts during the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated adoption of tele-neuro-ophthalmology. This review highlights the challenges and opportunities with tele-neuro-ophthalmology. RECENT FINDINGS: Tele-neuro-ophthalmology programs can be used for triage, diagnostic consultation, and long-term treatment monitoring. Formats include telephone appointments, interprofessional collaborations, remote data interpretation, online asynchronous patient communication, and video visits. Barriers to long-term implementation of tele-neuro-ophthalmology arise from data quality, patient engagement, workflow integration, state and federal regulations, and reimbursement. General neurologists may collaborate with local eye care providers for ophthalmic examination, imaging, and testing to facilitate efficient and effective tele-neuro-ophthalmology consultation. SUMMARY: Tele-neuro-ophthalmology has tremendous potential to improve patient access to high-quality cost-effective neuro-ophthalmic care. However, many factors may impact its long-term sustainability.


Subject(s)
Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Neurology/methods , Ophthalmology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Triage
20.
Acta Ophthalmol ; 99(7): e973-e983, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024184

ABSTRACT

In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, this paper provides recommendations for medical eye care during the easing of control measures after lockdown. The guidelines presented are based on a literature review and consensus among all Spanish Ophthalmology Societies regarding protection measures recommended for the ophthalmologic care of patients with or without confirmed COVID-19 in outpatient, inpatient, emergency and surgery settings. We recommend that all measures be adapted to the circumstances and availability of personal protective equipment at each centre and also highlight the need to periodically update recommendations as we may need to readopt more restrictive measures depending on the local epidemiology of the virus. These guidelines are designed to avoid the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 among both patients and healthcare staff as we gradually return to normal medical practice, to prevent postoperative complications and try to reduce possible deficiencies in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the ophthalmic diseases. With this update (5th ) the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology is placed as one of the major ophthalmology societies providing periodic and systematized recommendations for ophthalmic care during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Ophthalmology/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Telemedicine/methods
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