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1.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 159, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the COVID-19 pandemic context, a massive shortage of personal protective equipment occurred. To increase the available stocks, several countries appealed for donations from individuals or industries. While national and international standards to evaluate personal protective equipment exist, none of the previous research studied how to evaluate personal protective equipment coming from donations to healthcare establishments. Our aim was to evaluate the quality and possible use of the personal protective equipment donations delivered to our health care establishment in order to avoid a shortage and to protect health care workers throughout the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: Our intervention focused on evaluation of the quality of donations for medical use through creation of a set of assessment criteria and analysis of the economic impact of these donations. RESULTS: Between 20th March 2020 and 11th May 2020, we received 239 donations including respirators, gloves, coveralls, face masks, gowns, hats, overshoes, alcohol-based hand rubs, face shields, goggles and aprons. A total of 448,666 (86.3%) products out of the 519,618 initially received were validated and distributed in health care units, equivalent to 126 (52.7%) donations out of the 239 received. The budgetary value of the validated donations was 32,872 euros according to the pre COVID-19 prices and 122,178 euros according to the current COVID-19 prices, representing an increase of 371.7%. CONCLUSIONS: By ensuring a constant influx of personal protective equipment and proper stock management, shortages were avoided. Procurement and distribution of controlled and validated personal protective equipment is the key to providing quality care while guaranteeing health care worker safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Eye Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Health Personnel/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Masks/supply & distribution , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Protective Clothing/supply & distribution , Safety Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Protective Clothing/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Can J Psychiatry ; 66(1): 17-24, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072892

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between perceived adequacy of personal protective equipment (PPE) and workplace-based infection control procedures (ICP) and mental health symptoms among a sample of health-care workers in Canada within the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A convenience-based internet survey of health-care workers in Canada was facilitated through various labor organizations between April 7 and May 13, 2020. A total of 7,298 respondents started the survey, of which 5,988 reported information on the main exposures and outcomes. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-2) screener, and depression symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) screener. We assessed the perceived need and adequacy of 8 types of PPE and 10 different ICP. Regression analyses examined the proportion of GAD-2 and PHQ-2 scores of 3 and higher across levels of PPE and ICP, adjusted for a range of demographic, occupation, workplace, and COVID-19-specific measures. RESULTS: A total of 54.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 53.5% to 56.1%) of the sample had GAD-2 scores of 3 and higher, and 42.3% (95% CI, 41.0% to 43.6%) of the sample had PHQ-2 scores of 3 and higher. Absolute differences of 18% (95% CI, 12% to 23%) and 17% (95% CI, 12% to 22%) were observed in the prevalence of GAD-2 scores of 3 and higher between workers whose perceived PPE needs and ICP needs were met compared to those who needs were not met. Differences of between 11% (95% CI, 6% to 17%) and 19% (95% CI, 14% to 24%) were observed in PHQ-2 scores of 3 and higher across these same PPE and ICP categories. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest strengthening employer-based infection control strategies likely has important implications for the mental health symptoms among health-care workers in Canada.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Infection Control/standards , Occupational Health , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Canada/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Eye Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Masks/supply & distribution , N95 Respirators/supply & distribution , Patient Health Questionnaire , Perception , Respiratory Protective Devices/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Surgical Attire/supply & distribution , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Am J Infect Control ; 49(3): 389-391, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-764060

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic resulted in a shortage of protective equipment. To meet the request of eye-protecting devices, an interdisciplinary consortium involving practitioners, researchers, engineers and technicians developed and manufactured thousands of inexpensive 3D-printed face shields, inside hospital setting. This action leads to the concept of "concurrent, agile, and rapid engineering".


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Eye Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Printing, Three-Dimensional , COVID-19/prevention & control , Conjunctiva/virology , Eye Protective Devices/virology , Health Personnel , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Personal Protective Equipment/virology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(6): 151293, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664371

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 Pandemic is an ongoing crisis that has strained hospitals and health systems around the globe. The provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline healthcare workers is of utmost importance in sustaining an effective response to this crisis. New York City has experienced one of the most devastating outbreaks of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In this article we report the experience of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University in New York City in managing the supply of PPE for providers and staff during the height of the outbreak. We describe the types of equipment used and aspects of PPE regulation and certification. We also describe our practices in extended use and reuse of PPE in light of the current understanding of the virus characteristics and modes of transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Eye Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Female , Gloves, Protective/supply & distribution , Health Personnel , Humans , Masks/standards , Masks/supply & distribution , New York City/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pregnancy , Surgical Attire/supply & distribution
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