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1.
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry ; 118: 110578, 2022 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864636

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence suggested that people with severe mental disorders were more vulnerable to the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, few researches investigated the influence of global pandemics on people at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical symptoms, psychological distress, and eye-tracking characteristics in CHR individuals and healthy participants. Forty-nine CHR individuals and 50 healthy controls (HC) were assessed by PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5), Perceived Stress Scale, 10-item version (PSS-10), and Coronavirus Impact Scale (CIS). Eye movement performances were measured by the tests of fixation stability, free-viewing, and anti-saccade. According to the mean score of CIS, participants were stratified into high-impact (n = 35) and low-impact (n = 64) subgroups. Compared with the HC group, CHR participants reported significantly higher levels of post-traumatic symptoms caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and showed abnormalities in most of the eye movement indexes. Among the altered indexes, the saccade amplitude of fixation stability test (far distractor), the scan path length of free-viewing test, and the accuracy of anti-saccade test were negatively affected by the severity of impact level in the CHR group. Moreover, the altered eye movement indexes were significantly associated with the total scores of CIS, PCL-5, and subscales of the Scale of Prodromal Syndromes (SOPS) among CHR individuals. Overall, our findings suggested the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the eye movement characteristics of CHR individuals. The present study provides valuable information on physiological distress related to the COVID-19 pandemic and sensitive neuropsychological biomarkers that interacted with social and environment stress in the CHR population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye-Tracking Technology , Humans , Pandemics , Prodromal Symptoms , Psychotic Disorders/psychology
2.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 7(1): 32, 2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782458

ABSTRACT

We examined how mask use affects performance and eye movements in face recognition and whether strategy change reflected in eye movements is associated with performance change. Eighty-eight participants performed face recognition with masked faces either during learning only, during recognition only, or during both learning and recognition. As compared with the baseline condition where faces were unmasked during both learning and recognition, participants had impaired performance in all three scenarios, with larger impairment when mask conditions during learning and recognition did not match. When recognizing unmasked faces, whether the faces were learned with or without a mask on did not change eye movement behavior. Nevertheless, when recognizing unmasked faces that were learned with a mask on, participants who adopted more eyes-focused patterns had less performance impairment as compared with the baseline condition. When recognizing masked faces, participants had more eyes-focused patterns and more consistent gaze transition behavior than recognizing unmasked faces regardless of whether the faces were learned with or without a mask on. Nevertheless, when recognizing masked faces that were learned without a mask, participants whose gaze transition behavior was more consistent had less performance impairment as compared with the baseline condition. Thus, although eye movements during recognition were mainly driven by the mask condition during recognition but not that during learning, those who adjusted their strategy according to the mask condition difference between learning and recognition had better performance. This finding has important implications for identifying populations vulnerable to the impact of mask use and potential remedial strategies.


Subject(s)
DiGeorge Syndrome , Facial Recognition , Eye Movements , Eye-Tracking Technology , Humans , Learning , Recognition, Psychology
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 855671, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776080

ABSTRACT

Healthy housing can set its occupants completely in good physical, mental and social conditions, but there is a lack of research in China on the public's willingness to pay (WTP) for healthy housing. From the perspective of cognitive psychology, this study constructs an analytical framework based on the model of "theory of planned behavior" (TPB), the theory of selective information exposure, and the model of "emotions as social information," while exploring the effect mechanism of the online reviews on the public's WTP for healthy housing during COVID-19 pandemic. In combination with eye-tracking experiments and subjective reports, physiological, psychological and behavioral multimodal data on WTP of 65 participants for healthy housing are collected. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) is adopted to analyze the formation effect mechanism of the public's WTP for healthy housing. This study acquires the following results: (i) Information attentiveness to online reviews on different valence information of healthy housing as obtained in eye tracking experiments delivers significant effect on attitude, subjective norm (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC), but has no direct effect on the public's WTP for healthy housing; (ii) Hypotheses from TPB model are verified. attitude, PBC and SN can all make significant effect on WTP for healthy housing, with attitude showcasing the most prominent effect; and (iii) In terms of the mediating effect, information attentiveness can deliver significant indirect effect on WTP through attitude.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eye-Tracking Technology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Housing , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261616, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pragmatic challenges remain in the monitoring and return to play (RTP) decisions following suspected Sports Related Concussion (SRC). Reliance on traditional approaches (pen and paper) means players readiness for RTP is often based on self-reported symptom recognition as a marker for full physiological recovery. Non-digital approaches also limit opportunity for robust data analysis which may hinder understanding of the interconnected nature and relationships in deficit recovery. Digital approaches may provide more objectivity to measure and monitor impairments in SRC. Crucially, there is dearth of protocols for SRC assessment and digital devices have yet to be tested concurrently (multimodal) in SRC rugby union assessment. Here we propose a multimodal protocol for digital assessment in SRC, which could be used to enhance traditional sports concussion assessment approaches. METHODS: We aim to use a repeated measures observational study utilising a battery of multimodal assessment tools (symptom, cognitive, visual, motor). We aim to recruit 200 rugby players (male n≈100 and female n≈100) from University Rugby Union teams and local amateur rugby clubs in the North East of England. The multimodal battery assessment used in this study will compare metrics between digital methods and against traditional assessment. CONCLUSION: This paper outlines a protocol for a multimodal approach for the use of digital technologies to augment traditional approaches to SRC, which may better inform RTP in rugby union. Findings may shed light on new ways of working with digital tools in SRC. Multimodal approaches may enhance understanding of the interconnected nature of impairments and provide insightful, more objective assessment and RTP in SRC. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04938570. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=NCT04938570&term=&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=.


Subject(s)
Athletic Injuries/diagnosis , Brain Concussion/diagnosis , Wearable Electronic Devices , Adult , Eye-Tracking Technology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Status and Dementia Tests , Young Adult
5.
Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc ; 2021: 2215-2221, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566240

ABSTRACT

In the course of the corona virus (COVID-19) pandemic, many digital solutions for mobile devices (e.g., apps) were presented in order to provide additional resources supporting the control of the pandemic. Contact tracing apps (i.e., identify persons who may have been in contact with a COVID-19 infected) constitute one of the most popular as well as promising solutions. However, as a prerequisite for an effective application, such apps highly depend on being used by large numbers of the population. Consequently, it is important that these apps offer a high usability for everyone. We therefore conducted an exploratory study to learn more about the usability of the German COVID-19 contact tracing app Corona-Warn-App (CWA). More specifically, N = 15 participants assessed the CWA, relying on a combined eye tracking and retrospective think aloud approach. The results indicate, on the one hand, that the CWA leaves a promising impression for pandemic control, as essential functions are easily recognized. However, on the other hand, issues were revealed (e.g., privacy policy) that could be addressed in future updates more properly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Contact Tracing , Eye-Tracking Technology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 64(3): 1008-1022, 2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454832

ABSTRACT

Aim The aim of this scoping review is to identify the eye tracking paradigms and eye movement measures used to investigate auditory and reading comprehension deficits in persons with aphasia (PWA). Method MEDLINE via PubMed, Cochrane, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, OTseeker, Scopus, Google Scholar, Grey Literature Database, and ProQuest Search (Dissertations & Theses) were searched for relevant studies. The Covidence software was used to manage the initial and full-text screening process for the search. Results and Discussion From a total of 1,803 studies, 68 studies were included for full-text screening. In addition, 418 records from gray literature were also screened. After full-text screening, 16 studies were included for this review-12 studies for auditory comprehension in PWA and four studies for reading comprehension in PWA. The review highlights the use of common eye tracking paradigms used to study language comprehension in PWA. We also discusse eye movement measures and how they help in assessing auditory and reading comprehension. Methodological challenges of using eye tracking are discussed. Conclusion The studies summarized in this scoping review provide evidence that the eye tracking methods are beneficial for studying auditory and reading comprehension in PWA.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , Comprehension , Eye Movements , Eye-Tracking Technology , Humans
7.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed ; 107(2): 156-160, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367410

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the experience with, and the feasibility of, point-of-view video recordings using eye-tracking glasses for training and reviewing neonatal interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Observational prospective single-centre study. SETTING: Neonatal intensive care unit at the Leiden University Medical Center. PARTICIPANTS: All local neonatal healthcare providers. INTERVENTION: There were two groups of participants: proceduralists, who wore eye-tracking glasses during procedures, and observers who later watched the procedures as part of a video-based reflection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the feasibility of, and the proceduralists and observers' experience with, the point-of-view eye-tracking videos as an additional tool for bedside teaching and video-based reflection. RESULTS: We conducted 12 point-of-view recordings on 10 different patients (median gestational age of 30.9±3.5 weeks and weight of 1764 g) undergoing neonatal intubation (n=5), minimally invasive surfactant therapy (n=5) and umbilical line insertion (n=2). We conducted nine video-based observations with a total of 88 observers. The use of point-of-view recordings was perceived as feasible. Observers further reported the point-of-view recordings to be an educational benefit for them and a potentially instructional tool during COVID-19. CONCLUSION: We proved the practicability of eye-tracking glasses for point-of-view recordings of neonatal procedures and videos for observation, educational sessions and logistics considerations, especially with the COVID-19 pandemic distancing measures reducing bedside teaching opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye-Tracking Technology , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Internship and Residency/methods , Video Recording , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Intubation/methods , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Surfactants/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2
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