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1.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(4): 1365-1370, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760976

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To study facial nerve palsy (FNP) in post-COVID-19-mucormycosis patients and its ocular complications, report different presentations of FNP in such patients, and propose its etiopathogenesis based on presentation and clinico-radiologic localization. Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out in patients of post-COVID-19-mucormycosis who presented at our tertiary center, over a period of 3 months. Motor and sensory examination of the facial nerve was done to diagnose FNP and localize the lesion clinically. Slit-lamp examination was done for grading corneal involvement. MRI brain, orbit, and paranasal sinuses (PNS) with contrast were studied to find involvement along the facial nerve. It was assessed whether this site of lesion corresponded with clinical localization. Data were analyzed using the percentage of total cases and Fisher's test. Results: A total of 300 patients with post-COVID-19 mucormycosis were examined, of which 30 (10%) patients were found to have FNP. All were lower motor neuron (LMN) type and were associated with corneal complications. The most common site clinically was distal to the chorda tympani (66.66%) and radiologically was infratemporal (IT) fossa (63.4%). The clinical localization significantly correlated with the radiological findings (P = 0.012). Twenty percent of patients showed incomplete involvement of facial muscles. Conclusion: FNP was found to be of LMN type. The most common site of insult was IT fossa. There was a good clinico-radiological correspondence of lesions. Isolated lesions were also found along the peripheral nerve course, presenting as incomplete facial palsy. Recognition of FNP in post-COVID-19 mucormycosis, in all its variable forms, is important to manage corneal complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Mucormycosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mucormycosis/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Prospective Studies
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 244, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1698872

ABSTRACT

We conducted a clinical study of a patient with no particular medical history and without a personal or family history presenting with right facial asymmetry occurred two days after COVID-19 vaccination (recombinant vaccine). Full clinical examination, laboratory assessments and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were normal, suggesting the diagnosis of post-vaccine peripheral facial palsy (COVID-19). The diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy following COVID-19 vaccination with complete recovery was retained.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
4.
Intern Med ; 61(2): 241-243, 2022 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633473

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients have been increasingly reported to develop various neurological manifestations. We herein present a rare case of bilateral facial nerve palsy in a patient that occurred 5 weeks after the onset of COVID-19. The patient had no motor or sensory deficits in his extremities, and there were no other diseases that may have resulted in bilateral facial palsy. Based on these findings, we concluded that the facial palsy in this case may have been triggered by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Facial Nerve , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Ann Phys Rehabil Med ; 65(1): 101600, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487945

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been associated with multiple neurological manifestations. Coronaviruses are known to have a neurotropic propensity, possibly leading to various neurological complications, including peripheral facial paralysis (PFP). However, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying neurological symptoms in COVID-19 are not completely understood. This report presents the first published case of facial palsy in an otherwise healthy child secondary to infection with the novel coronavirus SARS-Cov-2, with reflections on the natural course and the role of physical and rehabilitation medicine in this form of PFP. Thus, PFP may also be a manifestation of COVID-19 and in the current epidemiological context, physicians evaluating patients with facial palsy should exclude infection with SARS-Cov-2 to prevent diagnostic delays and further transmission of the disease. These patients may have a slower recovery and worse prognosis as compared with those with Bell's palsy. Thus, rehabilitation needs to be initiated promptly, and close follow-up must be assured to identify and address early complications.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy , COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Child , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMC Pediatr ; 21(1): 470, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a disease of varying presentation and neurological sequelae of the disease are being studied. Following a cluster of paediatric facial nerve palsy (FNP) cases in an area of South Wales with a high prevalence of COVID-19, we conducted an opportunistic study to determine whether there has been an increase of incidence of FNP and if there is an association between the FNP and COVID-19 in children. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the incidence of FNP between 2015 and 2020 across two hospitals within the health board. The incidence was compared with that in 2020 including a cluster of six children in 14 weeks, presenting to Royal Glamorgan Hospital between June and October. RESULTS: There were 48 cases of children with FNP across both hospital within the study years. Seven (7) cases in 2020. The incidence was not statistically different in comparison to other years. Five out of six of these children in 2020 had antibody testing for COVID-19. All serology testing (100%) returned negative for SARS-CoV- 2 antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: In high prevalence area for COVID-19, cases of children with FNP have not shown a commensurate increase. we have found no causal link between COVID-19 and FNP in children. While this is a small study, larger cohort studies are needed to support this finding. As new strains of COVID-19 are being reported in UK, South Africa and Brazil, physicians need to continue to be vigilant for consistent pattern of signs and symptoms, especially in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Facial Nerve , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Neuroimmunol ; 361: 577755, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472063

ABSTRACT

Vaccine administration may be involved in the development of some central nervous system demyelinating diseases. The COVID-19 vaccine is being administered to the entire population, but to date, little association between vaccination and the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) has been suggested, and only a few case reports have been published. Here, we present a 40-year-old woman who developed cervical myelitis after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Myelitis was considered the initial clinical manifestation of MS. Our case suggests a possible link between the vaccination and the clinical MS attack.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Adult , Facial Paralysis/complications , Female , Humans , Myelitis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 848-854, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454702

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Harmonic Scalpel and Ligasure (Covidien) devices are commonly used in head and neck surgery. Parotidectomy is a complex and intricate surgery that requires careful dissection of the facial nerve. This study aimed to compare surgical outcomes in parotidectomy using these haemostatic devices with traditional scalpel and cautery. METHOD: A systematic review of the literature was performed with subsequent meta-analysis of seven studies that compared the use of haemostatic devices to traditional scalpel and cautery in parotidectomy. Outcome measures included: temporary facial paresis, operating time, intra-operative blood loss, post-operative drain output and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: A total of 7 studies representing 675 patients were identified: 372 patients were treated with haemostatic devices, and 303 patients were treated with scalpel and cautery. Statistically significant outcomes favouring the use of haemostatic devices included operating time, intra-operative blood loss and post-operative drain output. Outcome measures that did not favour either treatment included facial nerve paresis and length of hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Overall, haemostatic devices were found to reduce operating time, intra-operative blood loss and post-operative drain output.


Subject(s)
Dissection/adverse effects , Facial Nerve/surgery , Hemostasis, Surgical/instrumentation , Parotid Gland/surgery , Blood Loss, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Drainage/trends , Electrocoagulation/adverse effects , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Period , Surgical Instruments/adverse effects
19.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(7): 1423-1435, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454038

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric facial palsy represents a rare multifactorial entity. Facial reanimation restores smiling, thus boosting self-confidence and social integration of the affected children. The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of microsurgical workhorse free functional muscle transfer procedures with emphasis on the long-term functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a literature search of the PubMed database from 1995 to 2019 using the following search strategy: "facial paralysis"[Title/Abstract] OR "facial palsy"[Title]. We used as limits: full text, English language, age younger than 18 years, and humans. Two independent reviewers performed the online screening process using Covidence. Forty articles met the inclusion criteria. The protocol was aligned with the PRISMA statement (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) and was registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO, CRD42019150112) of the National Institute for Health Research. RESULTS: Free functional muscle transfer procedures include mainly segmental gracilis, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis minor muscle transfer. Facial reanimation procedures with the use of the cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) or masseteric nerve result in almost symmetric smiles. The transplanted muscle grows harmoniously along with the craniofacial skeleton. Muscle function and aesthetic outcomes improve over time. All children presented improved self-esteem, oral commissure opening, facial animation, and speech. CONCLUSIONS: A two-stage CFNG plus an FFMT may restore a spontaneous emotive smile in pediatric facial palsy patients. Superior results of children FFMT compared to adults FFMT are probably attributed to greater brain plasticity.


Subject(s)
Facial Paralysis/congenital , Facial Paralysis/surgery , Muscle, Skeletal/innervation , Muscle, Skeletal/transplantation , Nerve Transfer/methods , Smiling , Child , Female , Humans , Meningeal Neoplasms/congenital , Meningeal Neoplasms/surgery , Rhabdomyosarcoma/congenital , Rhabdomyosarcoma/surgery
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