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1.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(4): 1365-1370, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760976

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To study facial nerve palsy (FNP) in post-COVID-19-mucormycosis patients and its ocular complications, report different presentations of FNP in such patients, and propose its etiopathogenesis based on presentation and clinico-radiologic localization. Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out in patients of post-COVID-19-mucormycosis who presented at our tertiary center, over a period of 3 months. Motor and sensory examination of the facial nerve was done to diagnose FNP and localize the lesion clinically. Slit-lamp examination was done for grading corneal involvement. MRI brain, orbit, and paranasal sinuses (PNS) with contrast were studied to find involvement along the facial nerve. It was assessed whether this site of lesion corresponded with clinical localization. Data were analyzed using the percentage of total cases and Fisher's test. Results: A total of 300 patients with post-COVID-19 mucormycosis were examined, of which 30 (10%) patients were found to have FNP. All were lower motor neuron (LMN) type and were associated with corneal complications. The most common site clinically was distal to the chorda tympani (66.66%) and radiologically was infratemporal (IT) fossa (63.4%). The clinical localization significantly correlated with the radiological findings (P = 0.012). Twenty percent of patients showed incomplete involvement of facial muscles. Conclusion: FNP was found to be of LMN type. The most common site of insult was IT fossa. There was a good clinico-radiological correspondence of lesions. Isolated lesions were also found along the peripheral nerve course, presenting as incomplete facial palsy. Recognition of FNP in post-COVID-19 mucormycosis, in all its variable forms, is important to manage corneal complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Mucormycosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mucormycosis/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Prospective Studies
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 244, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1698872

ABSTRACT

We conducted a clinical study of a patient with no particular medical history and without a personal or family history presenting with right facial asymmetry occurred two days after COVID-19 vaccination (recombinant vaccine). Full clinical examination, laboratory assessments and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were normal, suggesting the diagnosis of post-vaccine peripheral facial palsy (COVID-19). The diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy following COVID-19 vaccination with complete recovery was retained.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Intern Med ; 61(2): 241-243, 2022 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633473

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients have been increasingly reported to develop various neurological manifestations. We herein present a rare case of bilateral facial nerve palsy in a patient that occurred 5 weeks after the onset of COVID-19. The patient had no motor or sensory deficits in his extremities, and there were no other diseases that may have resulted in bilateral facial palsy. Based on these findings, we concluded that the facial palsy in this case may have been triggered by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Facial Nerve , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Ann Phys Rehabil Med ; 65(1): 101600, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487945

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been associated with multiple neurological manifestations. Coronaviruses are known to have a neurotropic propensity, possibly leading to various neurological complications, including peripheral facial paralysis (PFP). However, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying neurological symptoms in COVID-19 are not completely understood. This report presents the first published case of facial palsy in an otherwise healthy child secondary to infection with the novel coronavirus SARS-Cov-2, with reflections on the natural course and the role of physical and rehabilitation medicine in this form of PFP. Thus, PFP may also be a manifestation of COVID-19 and in the current epidemiological context, physicians evaluating patients with facial palsy should exclude infection with SARS-Cov-2 to prevent diagnostic delays and further transmission of the disease. These patients may have a slower recovery and worse prognosis as compared with those with Bell's palsy. Thus, rehabilitation needs to be initiated promptly, and close follow-up must be assured to identify and address early complications.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy , COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Child , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMC Pediatr ; 21(1): 470, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a disease of varying presentation and neurological sequelae of the disease are being studied. Following a cluster of paediatric facial nerve palsy (FNP) cases in an area of South Wales with a high prevalence of COVID-19, we conducted an opportunistic study to determine whether there has been an increase of incidence of FNP and if there is an association between the FNP and COVID-19 in children. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the incidence of FNP between 2015 and 2020 across two hospitals within the health board. The incidence was compared with that in 2020 including a cluster of six children in 14 weeks, presenting to Royal Glamorgan Hospital between June and October. RESULTS: There were 48 cases of children with FNP across both hospital within the study years. Seven (7) cases in 2020. The incidence was not statistically different in comparison to other years. Five out of six of these children in 2020 had antibody testing for COVID-19. All serology testing (100%) returned negative for SARS-CoV- 2 antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: In high prevalence area for COVID-19, cases of children with FNP have not shown a commensurate increase. we have found no causal link between COVID-19 and FNP in children. While this is a small study, larger cohort studies are needed to support this finding. As new strains of COVID-19 are being reported in UK, South Africa and Brazil, physicians need to continue to be vigilant for consistent pattern of signs and symptoms, especially in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Facial Nerve , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Fam Pract ; 39(1): 80-84, 2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286563

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccinations are a cornerstone of preventative medicine in the USA. However, growing concerns regarding facial nerve palsy following vaccination exist. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the occurrence of facial palsy as reported by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the VAERS database was performed for cases of 'Facial Palsy', 'Bell's Palsy', 'Facial Paralysis' and 'Ramsay Hunt Syndrome' between 2009 and 2018. Subgroup analysis was performed to determine gender, age, history of facial palsy, type of vaccine used, number of days until onset of symptoms and overall facial palsy rate. RESULTS: Nine hundred and forty-four entries met our inclusion criteria with 961 vaccine administrations resulting in facial paralysis. Facial palsy following vaccinations was evenly distributed across all age cohorts with two peaks between 60 and 74 years old and between 0 and 14 years old. Most patients were female (N = 526, 55.7%) without a reported history of facial palsy (N = 923, 97.8%). In 2009, reported incidence rate was 0.53%, as compared with 0.23% in 2018. The influenza vaccine had the greatest number of cases (N = 166, 17.3%), followed by the varicella (N = 87, 9.1%) and human papillomavirus vaccines (N = 47, 4.9%). CONCLUSIONS: With the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and recent approvals of the vaccinations, there is growing concern of facial palsy following vaccination. Although it is a known adverse event following vaccination, the likelihood of facial palsy following vaccination is low, with only 0.26% of overall reported cases over a 10-year span.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy , COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Influenza Vaccines , Bell Palsy/epidemiology , Bell Palsy/etiology , Child, Preschool , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Female , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
17.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(6)2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269776

ABSTRACT

Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome-temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a recently described syndrome. We describe the case of a 17-year-old man presenting with a recent illness consistent with COVID-19 who presented with fever, chest pain and anterior uveitis. He was treated with aspirin, pulsed methylprednisolone and tocilizumab followed by oral steroids. On day 16 from initial presentation, he developed a facial nerve palsy. He was managed with ongoing steroids and the addition of valaciclovir. PIMS-TS is an under-recognised condition among adult physicians and may not be well known in adult neurology. It is important for adult physicians and neurologists to be aware of PIMS-TS and its possible sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Adolescent , Child , Facial Nerve , Facial Paralysis/drug therapy , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
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