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1.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(5): 103129, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293531

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The symptoms of COVID-19 at the time of presentation mainly include fever, cough, respiratory distress and myalgia. On the other hand, as neurological symptoms, disruption of taste and smell and cerebrovascular pathologies are well-known, whereas other neurological symptoms and signs are being newly recognized. Sudden-onset sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and idiopathic acute facial paralysis (Bell's palsy) are otologic emergencies that are frequently encountered by otorhinolaryngology specialists. Although there are many articles describing SSNHL and Bell's palsy in the literature, the literature describing their relationship to COVID-19 is limited. In our study, we aimed to present the neuro-otologic relationship of SSNHL and Bell's palsy with COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The pretreatment real-time oronasopharyngeal PCR tests, COVID-19 symptomatology and COVID-19 infection statuses of patients who presented to our clinic with isolated SSNHL and Bell's palsy between April 2020 and April 2021 were questioned, and the data of the patients were collected. Throughout their treatment, the patients were followed-up in terms of COVID-19 infection. This is a prospective study. Moreover, to observe the change in the incidence, the data of patients visiting between January 2019 and January 2020 were also collected. The data of the patients were statistically analyzed using SPSS. RESULTS: The study included a total of 177 patients. The SSNHL group consisted of 91 patients, and the Bell's palsy group consisted of 86 patients. Neither group showed a statistically significant difference in comparison to the year without the pandemic in terms of the patient numbers (incidence), sex, age, morbidity, response to treatment or social habits. There was a statistically significant difference in age only in the Bell's palsy group, but this difference was not medically significant. CONCLUSION: As a result of our study, we did not observe a relationship between COVID-19 and cases of SSNHL and Bell's palsy. It is recommended to apply standard otologic treatment to isolated SSNHL and Bell's palsy patients whose association with COVID-19 is not determined.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/epidemiology , Hearing Loss, Sudden/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Bell Palsy/diagnosis , Bell Palsy/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/diagnosis , Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/virology , Hearing Loss, Sudden/diagnosis , Hearing Loss, Sudden/virology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Symptom Assessment , Turkey
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 766-774, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196399

ABSTRACT

We report a case series of five patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 who developed neurological symptoms, mainly expressing as polyradiculoneuritis and cranial polyneuritis in the 2 months of COVID-19 pandemic in a city in the northeast of Italy. A diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical presentation, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In four of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 g/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential compound muscle action potential (cMAP). Four patients presented a mild facial nerve involvement limited to the muscles of the lower face, with sparing of the forehead muscles associated to ageusia. In one patient, taste assessment showed right-sided ageusia of the tongue, ipsilateral to the mild facial palsy. In three patients we observed albuminocytological dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid, and notably, we found an increase of inflammatory mediators such as the interleukin-8. Peripheral nervous system involvement after infection with COVID-19 is possible and may include several signs that may be successfully treated with immunoglobulin therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Nervous System Physiological Phenomena , Neuritis/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/virology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Neuritis/therapy , Neuritis/virology , Polyradiculoneuropathy/diagnosis , Polyradiculoneuropathy/virology
3.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(5): 103032, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171724

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Publications about increased number of peripheral facial paralysis in the COVID-19 pandemic emerged in the literature. However, these studies comprised of an estimate rather than a broad analysis of exact numbers. In this study, we planned to investigate whether the pandemic really resulted in an increase in facial paralysis cases admitted to the hospital by evaluating the cases who applied to our hospital due to facial paralysis in the COVID-19 pandemic year and in the previous 4 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients who applied to our hospital due to facial paralysis between March 2016-February 2017 (Group 1), between March 2017-February 2018 (Group 2), between March 2018-February 2019 (Group 3), between March 2019-February 2020 (Group 4), and between March 2020-February 2021 (Group 5) were investigated and detailed data were noted. RESULTS: 156, 164, 149, 172 and 157 patients were admitted to the hospital due to peripheral facial paralysis in Group 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Of these patients, 155, 164, 145, 169, and 153 were Bell's palsy, respectively. SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test was positive in only 2 of the 153 patients who were diagnosed in the year of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the number of peripheral facial paralysis detected during the COVID-19 pandemic was similar to previous years. Very few number of positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test results may have been found incidentally in Bell's palsy patients. Theses stating that SARS-CoV-2 causes peripheral facial paralysis should be supported by laboratory studies and postmortem research.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Bell Palsy/diagnosis , Bell Palsy/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Turkey
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112321

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 and is a potentially fatal disease that is of great global public health concern. In addition to respiratory symptoms, neurological manifestations have been associated with COVID-19. This is attributed to the neurotropic nature of coronaviruses. The authors present a case of Bell's palsy associated with COVID-19 in a term primigravida.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy , COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Prednisolone/administration & dosage , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Stroke/diagnosis , Valacyclovir/administration & dosage , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Bell Palsy/etiology , Bell Palsy/physiopathology , Bell Palsy/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Diagnosis, Differential , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/physiopathology , Facial Paralysis/therapy , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Humans , Neurologic Examination/methods , Physical Therapy Modalities , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Treatment Outcome
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 30, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110741

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is an infection due to a novel virus belonging to the coronavirus family. Since December 2019, first human cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Wuhan (China) and rapidly has been progressed to a global pandemic declared by the world health organization (WHO) on March 11th 2020. The major complication of COVID-19, is pneumonia, but other presentations like cardiovascular and neurological complications have been reported. Herein, we report a first case of pregnant women presented with bifacial weakness and paraesthesia (BFP) associated to a vestibulocochlear neuritis as post-COVID-19 manifestation. This is a 36-year-old Moroccan female patient with a history of SARS-CoV-2 positive 6 weeks before admission. She presented to the emergency department with rapid bifacial paralysis, bilateral lower extremity paresthesia, vertigo, nausea, vomiting and right auricular pain. An acute stroke was ruled out after neurological examination and brain MRI. Clinical presentation, neurophysiological, audiometry and videonystagmography workup additionally to CSF findings were suggestive of a variant of Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS), which is BFP associated to right vestibulocochlear neuritis. The patient was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) therapy associated with intravenous steroids. The patient made a complete recovery of the right facial palsy and the sensorineural hearing loss but still have tingling in lower limbs and left facial palsy at 2 weeks´ follow-up. BFP can be induced by COVID-19 as a postinfectious immune-mediated complication. Regarding the pathophysiology of vestibular neuritis, is probably similar to other viral infection causing nerve damage. Clinicians should consider the association of vestibulocochlear neuritis and BFP as a post SARS-CoV-2 manifestation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Vestibular Neuronitis/virology , Adult , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Paresthesia/virology , Pregnancy , Vestibular Neuronitis/diagnosis
7.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(4): 102956, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077757

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Idiopathic facial palsy is called as Bell's palsy and reports showed that facial paralysis increased during COVID-19 pandemic period. There are many reports about the relationship between COVID-19 and facial paralysis but there is no prospective study. SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgM antibodies increase in COVID-19. Our purpose is to investigate SARS-CoV-2 IgG + IgM antibody in the Bell's palsy. METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional study was planned. Patients with acute peripheral facial paralysis with no reason and diagnosed as Bell's palsy was included in the study. In order to investigate SARS-CoV-2 in the etiologies of these patients, SARS-CoV-2 IgM + IgG (total) test was studied. SARS-CoV-2 IgG + IgM was measured by using the ADVIA Centaur® test kit. Test reports result in index values and as nonreactive or reactive. The results were analyzed. RESULTS: Forty-one patients were included in the study. The average age of the patients was 41,7. 17 (41,4%) were female and 24 (58,6%) were male. 21 patients had left-sided; 20 had right-sided paralysis. SARS-CoV-2 IgG + IgM values were measured two times of the patients. First control was in the first week of facial paralysis, 10 (24,3%) positivity was found. The average index of the positive patients were 6,74 (min.1,39-max.10) in the first control and 9,585 in the second control (min.8,7-max. 10). CONCLUSION: We found that the SARS-CoV-2 IgM + IgG antibody test was positive in 24.3% of the patients with Bell's palsy. The results are higher than the seroprevalence studies conducted in asymptomatic individuals. Facial paralysis could be the only symptom of COVID-19 but further studies must be done.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Facial Paralysis/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Symptom Assessment
9.
J Neurovirol ; 26(6): 941-944, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-812480

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic revealed several neurological syndromes related to this infection. We describe the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of eight patients with COVID-19 who developed peripheral facial palsy during infection. In three patients, facial palsy was the first symptom. Nerve damage resulted in mild dysfunction in five patients and moderate in three. SARS-Cov-2 was not detected in CSF by PCR in any of the samples. Seven out of eight patients were treated with steroids and all patients have complete or partial recovery of the symptoms. Peripheral facial palsy should be added to the spectrum of neurological manifestations associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Facial Paralysis/virology , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Facial Nerve/pathology , Facial Paralysis/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Prednisone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Intern Med ; 59(14): 1773-1775, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646480

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, has spread worldwide from China. There are no case reports from Asia of COVID-19 with facial paralysis and olfactory disturbance. We herein report a case of COVID-19 pneumonia in a Japanese woman who showed facial nerve palsy and olfactory disturbance.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Facial Paralysis/virology , Olfaction Disorders/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Facial Nerve/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Japan , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 766-774, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646665

ABSTRACT

We report a case series of five patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 who developed neurological symptoms, mainly expressing as polyradiculoneuritis and cranial polyneuritis in the 2 months of COVID-19 pandemic in a city in the northeast of Italy. A diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical presentation, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In four of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 g/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential compound muscle action potential (cMAP). Four patients presented a mild facial nerve involvement limited to the muscles of the lower face, with sparing of the forehead muscles associated to ageusia. In one patient, taste assessment showed right-sided ageusia of the tongue, ipsilateral to the mild facial palsy. In three patients we observed albuminocytological dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid, and notably, we found an increase of inflammatory mediators such as the interleukin-8. Peripheral nervous system involvement after infection with COVID-19 is possible and may include several signs that may be successfully treated with immunoglobulin therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Nervous System Physiological Phenomena , Neuritis/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/virology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Neuritis/therapy , Neuritis/virology , Polyradiculoneuropathy/diagnosis , Polyradiculoneuropathy/virology
13.
J Clin Neurosci ; 77: 230-232, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260331

ABSTRACT

We present a case of facial diplegia after 10 days of SARS-CoV-2 confirmed infection symptoms in a 61 year old patient without prior clinically relevant background. There are few known cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) related to SARS-CoV-2 infection; we propose this case as a rare variant of GBS in COVID-19 infection context, due to Its chronology, clinical manifestations and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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