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1.
Lancet ; 399(10319): 50-59, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients hospitalised with COVID-19 are at risk for thrombotic events after discharge; the role of extended thromboprophylaxis in this population is unknown. METHODS: In this open-label, multicentre, randomised trial conducted at 14 centres in Brazil, patients hospitalised with COVID-19 at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism [IMPROVE] venous thromboembolism [VTE] score of ≥4 or 2-3 with a D-dimer >500 ng/mL) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive, at hospital discharge, rivaroxaban 10 mg/day or no anticoagulation for 35 days. The primary efficacy outcome in an intention-to-treat analysis was a composite of symptomatic or fatal venous thromboembolism, asymptomatic venous thromboembolism on bilateral lower-limb venous ultrasound and CT pulmonary angiogram, symptomatic arterial thromboembolism, and cardiovascular death at day 35. Adjudication was blinded. The primary safety outcome was major bleeding. The primary and safety analyses were carried out in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04662684. FINDINGS: From Oct 8, 2020, to June 29, 2021, 997 patients were screened. Of these patients, 677 did not meet eligibility criteria; the remaining 320 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive rivaroxaban (n=160 [50%]) or no anticoagulation (n=160 [50%]). All patients received thromboprophylaxis with standard doses of heparin during hospitalisation. 165 (52%) patients were in the intensive care unit while hospitalised. 197 (62%) patients had an IMPROVE score of 2-3 and elevated D-dimer levels and 121 (38%) had a score of 4 or more. Two patients (one in each group) were lost to follow-up due to withdrawal of consent and not included in the intention-to-treat primary analysis. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in five (3%) of 159 patients assigned to rivaroxaban and 15 (9%) of 159 patients assigned to no anticoagulation (relative risk 0·33, 95% CI 0·12-0·90; p=0·0293). No major bleeding occurred in either study group. Allergic reactions occurred in two (1%) patients in the rivaroxaban group. INTERPRETATION: In patients at high risk discharged after hospitalisation due to COVID-19, thromboprophylaxis with rivaroxaban 10 mg/day for 35 days improved clinical outcomes compared with no extended thromboprophylaxis. FUNDING: Bayer.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/complications , Factor Xa Inhibitors/pharmacology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Rivaroxaban/pharmacology , Rivaroxaban/therapeutic use , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Heparin/administration & dosage , Heparin/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Treatment Outcome
2.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266922, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793497

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maintenance drugs are used to treat chronic conditions. Several classes of maintenance drugs have attracted attention because of their potential to affect susceptibility to and severity of COVID-19. METHODS: Using claims data on 20% random sample of Part D Medicare enrollees from April to December 2020, we identified patients diagnosed with COVID-19. Using a nested case-control design, non-COVID-19 controls were identified by 1:5 matching on age, race, sex, dual-eligibility status, and geographical region. We identified usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB), statins, warfarin, direct factor Xa inhibitors, P2Y12 inhibitors, famotidine and hydroxychloroquine based on Medicare prescription claims data. Using extended Cox regression models with time-varying propensity score adjustment we examined the independent effect of each study drug on contracting COVID-19. For severity of COVID-19, we performed extended Cox regressions on all COVID-19 patients, using COVID-19-related hospitalization and all-cause mortality as outcomes. Covariates included gender, age, race, geographic region, low-income indicator, and co-morbidities. To compensate for indication bias related to the use of hydroxychloroquine for the prophylaxis or treatment of COVID-19, we censored patients who only started on hydroxychloroquine in 2020. RESULTS: Up to December 2020, our sample contained 374,229 Medicare patients over 65 who were diagnosed with COVID-19. Among the COVID-19 patients, 278,912 (74.6%) were on at least one study drug. The three most common study drugs among COVID-19 patients were statins 187,374 (50.1%), ACEI 97,843 (26.2%) and ARB 83,290 (22.3%). For all three outcomes (diagnosis, hospitalization and death), current users of ACEI, ARB, statins, warfarin, direct factor Xa inhibitors and P2Y12 inhibitors were associated with reduced risks, compared to never users. Famotidine did not show consistent significant effects. Hydroxychloroquine did not show significant effects after censoring of recent starters. CONCLUSION: Maintenance use of ACEI, ARB, warfarin, statins, direct factor Xa inhibitors and P2Y12 inhibitors was associated with reduction in risk of acquiring COVID-19 and dying from it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Hypertension , Aged , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Famotidine/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hypertension/complications , Medicare , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology , Warfarin/therapeutic use
3.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 28: 10760296211073922, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COMPASS trial demonstrated that in patients with peripheral arterial disease, the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin compared with aspirin reduces the risk of major adverse limb events, but it is not known whether this combination can also improve symptoms in patients with intermittent claudication. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of the combination on claudication distance. STUDY DESIGN: Eighty-eight patients with intermittent claudication will be randomized to receive rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily or aspirin 100 mg once daily for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is the change in claudication distance from the baseline to 24 weeks, measured by 6 min walking test and treadmill test. The primary safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding according to the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis criteria. SUMMARY: The COMPASS CLAUDICATION trial will provide high-quality evidence regarding the effect of the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin on claudication distance in patients with peripheral arterial disease.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , Intermittent Claudication/drug therapy , Peripheral Arterial Disease/drug therapy , Double-Blind Method , Drug Therapy, Combination , Exercise Test , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intermittent Claudication/diagnosis , Intermittent Claudication/etiology , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prospective Studies , Rivaroxaban/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
4.
Nat Med ; 28(1): 39-50, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641982

ABSTRACT

Immune dysregulation is an important component of the pathophysiology of COVID-19. A large body of literature has reported the effect of immune-based therapies in patients with COVID-19, with some remarkable successes such as the use of steroids or anti-cytokine therapies. However, challenges in clinical decision-making arise from the complexity of the disease phenotypes and patient heterogeneity, as well as the variable quality of evidence from immunotherapy studies. This Review aims to support clinical decision-making by providing an overview of the evidence generated by major clinical trials of host-directed therapy. We discuss patient stratification and propose an algorithm to guide the use of immunotherapy strategies in the clinic. This will not only help guide treatment decisions, but may also help to design future trials that investigate immunotherapy in other severe infections.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Complement Inactivating Agents/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Bradykinin/analogs & derivatives , Bradykinin/therapeutic use , Bradykinin B2 Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydrocortisone/therapeutic use , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Interferon beta-1a/therapeutic use , Interferon beta-1b/therapeutic use , Interferon-gamma/therapeutic use , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Kallikrein-Kinin System , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(1): 54-58, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636663

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have established indications, according to recent guidelines for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including pulmonary embolism (PE), with a safer profile compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) in terms of a lower risk for major bleeding and no need of blood coagulation tests. However, DOACs are not indicated in the treatment of patients with triple-positive antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This limitation is often extended in clinical practice to patients with isolated positivity. The COVID-19 pandemic has sometimes made it difficult to maintain a safe VKA treatment, due to the practical difficulties of performing INR. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated 39 patients with a previous unprovoked VTE/PE, who were no longer eligible for VKA treatment due to the difficulty of performing INR during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown, in Italy. All patients had a positive LAC and refused a long-term anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin. They were shifted to edoxaban. RESULTS: Any recurrence of VTE/PE occurred during the observation period (up to eight months of treatment), while only one minor bleeding event was recorded (Hazard ratio=0.06, 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.11, p=0.094). No arterial events occurred during the observation period. Hemoglobin, platelets, and creatinine were unchanged during the observation period. CONCLUSIONS: Edoxaban treatment may be safe and effective in preventing the recurrence of VTE/PE in patients with isolated LAC positivity, without the occurrence of arterial events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/drug effects , Pandemics , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Thiazoles/therapeutic use , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pyridines/adverse effects , Quarantine , Thiazoles/adverse effects
6.
JAMA ; 326(17): 1703-1712, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525396

ABSTRACT

Importance: Acutely ill inpatients with COVID-19 typically receive antithrombotic therapy, although the risks and benefits of this intervention among outpatients with COVID-19 have not been established. Objective: To assess whether anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy can safely reduce major adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes among symptomatic but clinically stable outpatients with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: The ACTIV-4B Outpatient Thrombosis Prevention Trial was designed as a minimal-contact, adaptive, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy among 7000 symptomatic but clinically stable outpatients with COVID-19. The trial was conducted at 52 US sites between September 2020 and June 2021; final follow-up was August 5, 2021. Prior to initiating treatment, participants were required to have platelet count greater than 100 000/mm3 and estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Interventions: Random allocation in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to aspirin (81 mg orally once daily; n = 164), prophylactic-dose apixaban (2.5 mg orally twice daily; n = 165), therapeutic-dose apixaban (5 mg orally twice daily; n = 164), or placebo (n = 164) for 45 days. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was a composite of all-cause mortality, symptomatic venous or arterial thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for cardiovascular or pulmonary cause. The primary analyses for efficacy and bleeding events were limited to participants who took at least 1 dose of trial medication. Results: On June 18, 2021, the trial data and safety monitoring board recommended early termination because of lower than anticipated event rates; at that time, 657 symptomatic outpatients with COVID-19 had been randomized (median age, 54 years [IQR, 46-59]; 59% women). The median times from diagnosis to randomization and from randomization to initiation of study treatment were 7 days and 3 days, respectively. Twenty-two randomized participants (3.3%) were hospitalized for COVID-19 prior to initiating treatment. Among the 558 patients who initiated treatment, the adjudicated primary composite end point occurred in 1 patient (0.7%) in the aspirin group, 1 patient (0.7%) in the 2.5-mg apixaban group, 2 patients (1.4%) in the 5-mg apixaban group, and 1 patient (0.7%) in the placebo group. The risk differences compared with placebo for the primary end point were 0.0% (95% CI not calculable) in the aspirin group, 0.7% (95% CI, -2.1% to 4.1%) in the 2.5-mg apixaban group, and 1.4% (95% CI, -1.5% to 5.0%) in the 5-mg apixaban group. Risk differences compared with placebo for bleeding events were 2.0% (95% CI, -2.7% to 6.8%), 4.5% (95% CI, -0.7% to 10.2%), and 6.9% (95% CI, 1.4% to 12.9%) among participants who initiated therapy in the aspirin, prophylactic apixaban, and therapeutic apixaban groups, respectively, although none were major. Findings inclusive of all randomized patients were similar. Conclusions and Relevance: Among symptomatic clinically stable outpatients with COVID-19, treatment with aspirin or apixaban compared with placebo did not reduce the rate of a composite clinical outcome. However, the study was terminated after enrollment of 9% of participants because of an event rate lower than anticipated. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04498273.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Adult , Aspirin/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Double-Blind Method , Early Termination of Clinical Trials , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyridones/administration & dosage , Pyridones/adverse effects
8.
JAMA ; 326(17): 1703-1712, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460106

ABSTRACT

Importance: Acutely ill inpatients with COVID-19 typically receive antithrombotic therapy, although the risks and benefits of this intervention among outpatients with COVID-19 have not been established. Objective: To assess whether anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy can safely reduce major adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes among symptomatic but clinically stable outpatients with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: The ACTIV-4B Outpatient Thrombosis Prevention Trial was designed as a minimal-contact, adaptive, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy among 7000 symptomatic but clinically stable outpatients with COVID-19. The trial was conducted at 52 US sites between September 2020 and June 2021; final follow-up was August 5, 2021. Prior to initiating treatment, participants were required to have platelet count greater than 100 000/mm3 and estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Interventions: Random allocation in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to aspirin (81 mg orally once daily; n = 164), prophylactic-dose apixaban (2.5 mg orally twice daily; n = 165), therapeutic-dose apixaban (5 mg orally twice daily; n = 164), or placebo (n = 164) for 45 days. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was a composite of all-cause mortality, symptomatic venous or arterial thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for cardiovascular or pulmonary cause. The primary analyses for efficacy and bleeding events were limited to participants who took at least 1 dose of trial medication. Results: On June 18, 2021, the trial data and safety monitoring board recommended early termination because of lower than anticipated event rates; at that time, 657 symptomatic outpatients with COVID-19 had been randomized (median age, 54 years [IQR, 46-59]; 59% women). The median times from diagnosis to randomization and from randomization to initiation of study treatment were 7 days and 3 days, respectively. Twenty-two randomized participants (3.3%) were hospitalized for COVID-19 prior to initiating treatment. Among the 558 patients who initiated treatment, the adjudicated primary composite end point occurred in 1 patient (0.7%) in the aspirin group, 1 patient (0.7%) in the 2.5-mg apixaban group, 2 patients (1.4%) in the 5-mg apixaban group, and 1 patient (0.7%) in the placebo group. The risk differences compared with placebo for the primary end point were 0.0% (95% CI not calculable) in the aspirin group, 0.7% (95% CI, -2.1% to 4.1%) in the 2.5-mg apixaban group, and 1.4% (95% CI, -1.5% to 5.0%) in the 5-mg apixaban group. Risk differences compared with placebo for bleeding events were 2.0% (95% CI, -2.7% to 6.8%), 4.5% (95% CI, -0.7% to 10.2%), and 6.9% (95% CI, 1.4% to 12.9%) among participants who initiated therapy in the aspirin, prophylactic apixaban, and therapeutic apixaban groups, respectively, although none were major. Findings inclusive of all randomized patients were similar. Conclusions and Relevance: Among symptomatic clinically stable outpatients with COVID-19, treatment with aspirin or apixaban compared with placebo did not reduce the rate of a composite clinical outcome. However, the study was terminated after enrollment of 9% of participants because of an event rate lower than anticipated. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04498273.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Adult , Aspirin/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Double-Blind Method , Early Termination of Clinical Trials , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyridones/administration & dosage , Pyridones/adverse effects
9.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211039288, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448131

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a systemic disease that can be life-threatening involving immune and inflammatory responses, and that can result in potentially lethal complications, including venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). Forming an integrative approach to thrombo-prophylaxis and coagulation treatment for COVID-19 patients ensues. We aim at reviewing the literature for anticoagulation in the setting of COVID-19 infection to provide a summary on anticoagulation for this patient population. COVID-19 infection is associated with a state of continuous inflammation, which results in macrophage activation syndrome and an increased rate of thrombosis. Risk assessment models to predict the risk of thrombosis in critically ill patients have not yet been validated. Currently published guidelines suggest the use of prophylactic intensity over intermediate intensity or therapeutic intensity anticoagulant for patients with critical illness or acute illness related to COVID-19 infection. Critically ill COVID-19 patients who are diagnosed with acute VTE are considered to have a provoking factor, and, therefore, treatment duration should be at least 3 months. Patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism should receive parenteral over oral anticoagulants with low-molecular-weight heparin or fondaparinux preferred over unfractionated heparin. In patients with impending hemodynamic compromise due to PE, and who are not at increased risk for bleeding, reperfusion may be necessary. Internists should remain updated on new emerging evidence regarding anticoagulation for COVID-19 patients. Awaiting these findings, we invite internists to perform individualized decisions that are unique for every patient and to base them on clinical judgment for risk assessment.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Consensus , Critical Illness , Disease Management , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fondaparinux/adverse effects , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Heparin/adverse effects , Heparin/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/adverse effects , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Risk , Thrombophilia/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
10.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438739

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) commonly complicates with coagulopathy. A syndrome called Long-COVID-19 is emerging recently in COVID-19 survivors, characterized, in addition to the persistence of symptoms typical of the acute phase, by alterations in inflammatory and coagulation parameters due to endothelial damage. The related disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) can be associated with high death rates in COVID-19 patients. It is possible to find a prothrombotic state also in Long-COVID-19. Early administration of anticoagulants in COVID-19 was suggested in order to improve patient outcomes, although exact criteria for their application were not well-established. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was commonly adopted for counteracting DIC and venous thromboembolism (VTE), due to its pharmacodynamics and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the efficacy of anticoagulant therapy for COVID-19-associated DIC is still a matter of debate. Thrombin and Factor Xa (FXa) are well-known components of the coagulation cascade. The FXa is known to strongly promote inflammation as the consequence of increased cytokine expression. Endothelial cells and mononuclear leucocytes release cytokines, growth factors, and adhesion molecules due to thrombin activation. On the other hand, cytokines can activate coagulation. The cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation is mediated via protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors might become potential targets to be considered for counteracting the clinical expressions of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 is effectively able to activate local and circulating coagulation factors, thus inducing the generation of disseminated coagula. LMWH may be considered as the new frontier in the treatment of COVID-19 and Long-COVID-19. Indeed, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) may be an alternative option for both early and later treatment of COVID-19 patients due to their ability to inhibit PARs. The aim of this report was to evaluate the role of anticoagulants-and DOACs in particular in COVID-19 and Long-COVID-19 patients. We report the case of a COVID-19 patient who, after administration of enoxaparin developed DIC secondary to virosis and positivity for platelet factor 4 (PF4) and a case of Long-COVID with high residual cardiovascular risk and persistence of blood chemistry of inflammation and procoagulative state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Endothelial Cells , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/immunology
11.
Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol ; 14(10): 1289-1294, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360277

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the clinical performance of edoxaban for the treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis selecting hospitalized patients with COVID-19 admitted to our Institution from 20 May 2020 to 20 November 2020 with computer tomography (CT) detected PE at admission, treated with edoxaban after initial parenteral therapy. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without ARDS at admission and between those with and without CT confirmed PE resolution. RESULTS: 50 patients were included. Mean follow-up was 42.5 ± 10 days. No baseline differences were found between patients with ARDS (30%) and those without ARDS at admission. Patients with PE resolution (84%) were younger (P = 0.03), had a shorter duration of fondaparinux therapy (9.9 ± 3.8 vs 15.8 ± 7.5 days; P = 0.0015) and length of hospitalization (36 ± 8 vs 46 ± 9 days: P = 0.0023) compared with those without PE resolution. 2 patients experienced major bleedings. At multivariate analysis the time to edoxaban switch was the only predictor of the PE resolution (HR: 0.92; 95% C.I. 0.86 to 0.99). CONCLUSION: Edoxaban was an effective and safe treatment for acute PE in COVID-19 setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pyridines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Thiazoles/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Female , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Proportional Hazards Models , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Retrospective Studies
13.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305444

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
14.
Thromb Res ; 205: 1-7, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is unclear if direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) use before hospitalization due to COVID-19 diagnosis would potentially impact the severity and clinical outcomes thereafter. We compared 30-day hospitalization/re-hospitalization and clinical outcomes between patients on chronic DOAC therapy and patients not on oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy at time of COVID-19 diagnosis. METHODS: We used data from TriNetX, a global federated health research network. Patients aged ≥18 years who were treated with DOACs at time of COVID-19 diagnosis between 20 January 2020 and 28 February 2021 were included, and matched with patients not on OAC therapy from the same period. All patients were followed-up at 30-days after COVID-19 diagnosis. The primary outcomes were all-cause mortality, hospitalization/re-hospitalization, venous thromboembolism (VTE) and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). RESULTS: 738,423 patients were included. After propensity score matching (PSM), 26,006 patients remained in the study (13,003 on DOACs; 13,003 not on OAC). DOAC-treated patients (mean age 67.1 ± 15.4 years, 52.2% male) had higher relative risks (RRs) and lower 30-days event-free survival as compared to patients not on OAC for all-cause mortality (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.12-1.44; Log-Rank test p = 0.010), hospitalization/re-hospitalization (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.64-1.82; Log-Rank test p < 0.001) and VTE (RR 4.51, 95% CI 3.91-5.82; Log-Rank test p < 0.001), but not for ICH (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.54-1.51; Log-Rank test p = 0.513). CONCLUSION: In COVID-19 patients, previous DOAC therapy at time of diagnosis was not associated with improved clinical outcomes or lower hospitalization/re-hospitalization rate compared to patients not taking OAC therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Administration, Oral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Testing , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy
15.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211025927, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268172

ABSTRACT

With over 600 million coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine doses administered globally, adverse events are constantly monitored. Recently however, reports of thrombosis and thrombocytopenia following vaccination with the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine have emerged. This paper aims to review the available literature and guidelines pertaining to vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) and the proposed guidelines, while offering a potential approach that unifies the available evidence. While the risk of VITT remains extremely low and the benefits outweigh the risks, experimental studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiology behind VITT and possibly decrease the risk of thrombosis and other adverse events occurring. However, treatment should not be delayed in suspected cases, and IV immunoglobulin and non-heparin anticoagulation should be initiated.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Antithrombins/therapeutic use , Autoantibodies/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Thrombosis/pathology
16.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205884

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
17.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43(6): 1284-1290, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186165

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with COVID-19 frequently exhibit a hypercoagulable state with high thrombotic risk, particularly those admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Thromboprophylaxis is mandatory in these patients; nevertheless, thrombosis still occurs in many cases. Thus, the problem of assessing an adequate level of anticoagulation in ICU patients becomes evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the heparin resistance and the efficacy of heparin monitoring using an anti-Xa activity assay. METHODS: Thirty-seven heparin-treated patients admitted to ICU for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia were retrospectively studied for antifactor Xa activity (anti-Xa), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), Antithrombin, Fibrinogen, D-Dimer, Factor VIII, von Willebrand Factor, and the total daily amount of heparin administered. The correlation between APTT and anti-Xa was evaluated for unfractionated heparins (UFH). The correlations between the daily dose of UFH or the dosage expressed as IU/kg b.w. for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and anti-Xa were also evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients received calcium heparin, 8 sodium heparin, and 8 LMWH. A moderate correlation was found between APTT and anti-Xa for UFH. APTT did not correlate with coagulation parameters. 62% of UFH and 75% of LMWH treated patients were under the therapeutic range. About 75% of patients could be considered resistant to heparin. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-COV2 pneumonia patients in ICU have frequently heparin resistance. Anti-Xa seems a more reliable method to monitor heparin treatment than APTT in acute patients, also because the assay is insensitive to the increased levels of fibrinogen, FVIII, and LAC that are common during the COVID-19 inflammatory state.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , Drug Monitoring/methods , Heparin/therapeutic use , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Aged , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Drug Resistance , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Heparin/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/prevention & control
18.
Am J Cardiovasc Drugs ; 20(6): 525-533, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-755898

ABSTRACT

Human factor Xa (FXa) is a serine protease of the common coagulation pathway. FXa is known to activate prothrombin to thrombin, which eventually leads to the formation of cross-linked blood clots. While this process is important in maintaining hemostasis, excessive thrombin generation results in a host of thrombotic conditions. FXa has also been linked to inflammation via protease-activated receptors. Together, coagulopathy and inflammation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral infections, including the current coronavirus pandemic. Direct FXa inhibitors have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects, in addition to their established anticoagulant activity. This review summarizes the pharmacological activities of direct FXa inhibitors, their pharmacokinetics, potential drug-drug interactions and adverse effects, and the details of clinical trials involving direct FXa inhibitors in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/pharmacology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/physiopathology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Drug Interactions , Factor Xa/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Half-Life , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Metabolic Clearance Rate , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/prevention & control , Pandemics , Protein Binding/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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