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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 411, 2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all spheres of society including medical education and healthcare systems. In response to the pandemic, there has been a transition in medical education practice from traditional forms of teaching to online instruction delivery and virtual learning. Effective clinical microbiology education involves a combination of 'hands-on' practical learning and instructional delivery of scientific knowledge. Microbiology practical laboratories are critical learning environments offering 'hands-on' learning experiences that cannot be replicated through online learning. We conducted a mixed-methods study to understand the perception of online and face-to-face microbiology laboratory sessions among the medical students and microbiology faculty at Arabian Gulf University (AGU). METHODS: The study participants were third and fourth-year undergraduate medical students and faculty involved in delivering microbiology labs at AGU. The questionnaire consisted of questions ranging from perceived learning style to attitude towards online delivery of microbiology curriculum. After the questionnaire administration (google form), focus group discussion (FGD) was conducted for students and microbiology faculty separately. RESULTS: Among 168 students, 50.6% preferred face-to-face lab sessions as compared to 30.4% who preferred online labs, and 51.8% considered online labs to be an essential addition to face-to-face labs. Among the faculty, 85.7% preferred the face-to-face mode of teaching. All the faculty (100%) disagreed that all the microbiology labs teaching should be online. 57.2% considered online labs to be an essential addition to traditional face-to-face labs. Both faculty and students hold that a blended mode of instructional delivery is vital and indispensable for the transfer of skills and knowledge for microbiology students. CONCLUSION: The blended mode of delivering microbiology laboratory sessions in medical school is successful and well-received by both students and faculty. Students take the responsibility for furthering their own learning and understanding of concepts. Instructors have also noticed that blending learning strategies also successfully enhances the development of cognitive skills and problem-solving abilities in students. A review of the microbiology lab curriculum is necessary to identify content areas that can be delivered effectively through online, face-to-face lab sessions, or both, supported with appropriate tools and infrastructure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Faculty , Humans , Laboratories , Pandemics , Perception , Students, Medical/psychology , Universities
2.
MedEdPORTAL ; 18: 11243, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876247

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Teaching on physical examination, especially evidence-based physical diagnosis, is at times lacking on general medicine rounds. We created a hospitalist faculty workshop on teaching evidence-based physical diagnosis. Methods: The workshop included a systematic approach to teaching evidence-based physical diagnosis, multiple teaching resources, and observed peer teaching. A long-term follow-up session was offered several months after the workshop. Participants completed questionnaires before and after the workshop as well as after the long-term follow-up session. Results: Four workshops were conducted and attended by 28 unique participants. Five hospitalists attended long-term follow-up sessions. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, repeat sessions and long-term follow-up were limited. In paired analyses compared to preworkshop, respondents after the workshop reported a higher rate of prioritizing ( p = .008), having a systematic approach to ( p < .001), and confidence in ( p = .001) teaching evidence-based physical diagnosis. Compared to before the workshop, participants after the workshop were able to name more resources to inform teaching of evidence-based physical diagnosis ( p < .001). Informal feedback was positive. Respondents noted that the workshop could be improved by allowing more practice of the actual physical exam maneuvers and more observed teaching. Discussion: We created and implemented a workshop to train hospitalists in teaching evidence-based physical diagnosis. This workshop led to improvements in faculty attitudes and teaching skills. Long-term outcomes were limited by low participation due in part to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalists , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Examination
3.
Perspect Med Educ ; 11(1): 45-52, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872787

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coaching is a growing clinician-educator role. Self-efficacy is a powerful faculty motivator that is associated positively with job satisfaction and negatively with burnout. This study examines self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and burnout in coaches and other clinician-educators. METHODS: We conducted a mixed methods study using a quantitative survey followed by qualitative interviews of faculty at the University of California, San Francisco. Coaches (funded 20% full-time equivalents), faculty with other funded education positions ("funded"), and faculty without funded education positions ("unfunded") completed a 48-item survey addressing self-efficacy (teaching, professional development, and scholarship), job satisfaction, and burnout. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance followed by post-hoc tests and chi-square tests. To elaborate quantitative results, we conducted qualitative interviews of 15 faculty and analyzed data using framework analysis. RESULTS: 202 of 384 faculty (52.6%) responded to the survey; 187 complete surveys were analyzed. Teaching self-efficacy was similar across groups. Coaches and funded educators had significantly higher professional development self-efficacy and job satisfaction than unfunded educators. Burnout was more prevalent in coaches and unfunded educators. Qualitative analysis yielded three themes: sources of reward, academic identity, and strategies to mitigate burnout. Educator roles provide reward that enhances self-efficacy and job satisfaction but also generate competing demands. Coaches cited challenges in forming professional identities and working with struggling learners. DISCUSSION: The coaching role provides faculty with benefits similar to other funded educator roles, but the particular demands of the coach role may contribute to burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Job Satisfaction , Faculty , Humans , Self Efficacy , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Acoust Soc Am ; 151(5): 3234, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868710

ABSTRACT

Due to global shifts at educational institutions from in-person courses to online formats caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the current study aimed to estimate whether currently available virtual audiology education tools are helpful for acquiring necessary audiology skills and knowledge from the perspective of both educators and students. Therefore, a remote survey was developed and distributed to faculty and students in undergraduate communication sciences disorders and graduate audiology programs. Although participation was somewhat limited, the trends observed in the survey results suggested that the majority of both educators and students found the subset of virtual tools easy to use, that these tools improved teaching methods and learning outcomes, and that these tools would likely be used again.


Subject(s)
Audiology , COVID-19 , Audiology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Students
5.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 8990, 2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868019

ABSTRACT

While the negative impact of the pandemic on students' mental health has been studied around the world, very little is known about the mental health of faculty and staff. This research aims to examine mental health among Japanese faculty members who taught online courses during the COVID-19 pandemic. We recruited 537 university faculty members and assessed their mental health using the World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5), both retrospectively (during the academic year before the onset of the pandemic) and during the pandemic. We also evaluated workload (number of online lectures taught and preparation time per class), difficulty in using information technology (IT) for online classes, and satisfaction with the university support service for online education. As a result, the WHO-5 score during the COVID-19 pandemic was significantly lower than before, and 33.5% of the faculty members were recognized as being at risk for mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic. A binomial logistic regression analysis revealed two significant risk factors for mental illness-faculty members were more at risk for mental illness when they experienced difficulty in using IT for online classes, and were unsatisfied with the administrative support for online education. The deterioration of mental health during the COVID-19 was not predicted by workload, such as the number of online lectures and preparation time. These results suggest the importance of improving workplace support services, especially IT support, to prevent mental health deterioration among faculty teaching online.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/psychology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
6.
J Physician Assist Educ ; 33(2): 78-86, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865004

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted United States (US) health professions educational programs. Physician assistant (PA) programs were forced to respond to rapidly changing circumstances early in the pandemic. This study describes the impact that the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic had on PA programs in the United States. METHODS: This cross-sectional study is based on data from the COVID-19 Rapid Response Report 1, conducted by the Physician Assistant Education Association in April 2020. The survey sample included 254 US PA program directors with a response rate of 64.2%. Our outcome measures included temporary changes to PA program operations and clinical training, and current and upcoming budget and tuition changes, as well as the impact of the pandemic on faculty and staff employment. We used descriptive statistics to summarize these outcomes, stratified by 4 categories characterizing features of PA programs, including geographical location, academic housing, funding model, and academic health center status. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic impact on programs varied geographically. A majority of programs reported making numerous temporary changes to their operations. Most programs moved both didactic and clinical education to an online format. Clinical training was temporarily suspended at almost all programs. CONCLUSIONS: PA programs continued training despite the pandemic. The long-term impact of the pandemic may be the instability of the PA education workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physician Assistants , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Physician Assistants/education , United States
7.
J Physician Assist Educ ; 33(2): 135-138, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865003

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The psychological effects of COVID-19 have been extensive and have affected health care workers and educators alike. The aims of this study were to evaluate how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted PA faculty and their attitudes toward work. METHODS: Two quantitative, pre/post surveys were offered to 21 PA faculty at one institution prior to and then one year into the COVID-19 pandemic. PA faculty perceptions of workplace culture and burnout were included in the online surveys. RESULTS: Data were collected on 17 PA faculty (81% response rate). There was a statistically nonsignificant decrease in faculty disengagement (2.1 v 2.1, p = 0.87) and a statistically significant increase in faculty exhaustion (2.2 v 2.5, p = 0.005). There were statistically significant increases in communication, value, job satisfaction, and wellbeing workplace items. CONCLUSION: As many workplace protocols remain changed as a result of COVID-19, institutions should monitor and adjust processes to reduce the risk of burnout for faculty.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physician Assistants , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/psychology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Physician Assistants/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Rev. Bras. Saúde Mater. Infant. (Online) ; 21(supl.2): 539-544, 2021.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1862366

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: to describe and discuss interventions and strategies carried out at Faculdade Pernambucana de Saúde (FPS) during the COVID-19 pandemic to mitigate impairment in learning and preserve students, tutors, and staff's health. Experience report: the teaching methodology used by FPS is problem-based learning, which greatly facilitated the non-discontinuity of theoretical activities carried out in-person in tutorial sessions involving a tutor and 10 to 12 students. This format was transferred to Webex Meetings rooms and held remotely. Practical laboratory activities were suspended and resumed when allowed in July. The teaching outpatient activities (third and fourth year) were suspended and resumed in August. Two years of internship were interrupted for 30 days (fifth year) and for 15 days (sixth year). External activities of practices in primary care were also suspended and resumed gradually. All assessments and activities that required face-to-face meetings, integrations, scientific initiation program orientations, collegiate meetings, meetings of the self-assessment committee were and are being carried out remotely. Conclusions: we believe that we were able to mitigate impairment in students' learning without compromising the conclusion of the school year that was facilitated by Problem Based Learning method.


Resumo Objetivo: descrever e discutir intervenções e estratégias realizadas pela Faculdade Pernambucana de Saúde (FPS) durante a pandemia de COVID-19 para atenuar prejuízos no aprendizado e preservar a saúde de estudantes, docentes e funcionários. Relato de experiência: a metodologia de ensino usada pela FPS é a aprendizagem baseada em problemas, que facilitou a não descontinuidade das atividades teóricas realizadas presencialmente em sessões tutoriais que envolvem um docente e dez a 12 estudantes, que foram transferidas para salas de Webex Meetings de forma remota. As atividades de laboratórios práticas foram suspensas e retomadas quando permitido no mês de julho. As atividades de ambulatório de ensino (terceiro e quarto ano) foram suspensas e retomadas em agosto. Os dois anos de internato sofreram interrupção de 30 dias (quinto ano) e 15 dias (sexto ano). As atividades externas de práticas em atenção primária também foram suspensas e retomadas gradativamente. Todas as avaliações e atividades que necessitavam reuniões presenciais: integrações, orientações de programa de iniciação científica, reuniões colegiadas, reuniões da comissão própria de autoavaliação foram e estão sendo realizadas de forma remota. Conclusões: acreditamos que conseguimos minimizar os prejuízos no aprendizado dos estudantes sem comprometimento de conclusão do ano letivo que foi facilitado pela metodologia de aprendizagem baseada em problemas.


Subject(s)
Humans , Schools, Medical , Students , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Faculty/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Learning , Social Isolation , Brazil/epidemiology , Quarantine , Teacher Training
9.
J Clin Psychol Med Settings ; 29(1): 10-19, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1859048

ABSTRACT

An interprofessional approach to pediatric behavioral care is increasingly important in the care of pediatric patients, who present to healthcare settings with a wide variety of concerns ranging from potty training to depression. Previously, much of the care of these patients have focused on a narrow approach to the problem, based on the expertise of the professional providing care. Faculty from three disciplines: Social Work, Psychology, and Medicine collaborated to design a course for students from these three disciplines to collaborate in attaining three goals: (1) reinforce the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration, (2) share clinical techniques and skills in a simulated interprofessional setting, and (3) practice collaboration within interprofessional teams. We detail the course goals and design and topics covered and discuss implementation of this course. Suggested module content and pedagogical design are discussed, and case examples are detailed with the goal of encouraging the adoption of similar courses.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Relations , Pediatrics , Child , Cooperative Behavior , Faculty , Humans , Patient Care Team
10.
Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol ; 28(4): 230-238, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835268

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Faculty development for procedural specialists aims at developing both their medical education and surgical competence. This has been challenging during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially in under-resourced settings and African Lusophone ophthalmology community has been no exception. The Mozambican College of Ophthalmology (MOC) and the Continuing Professional Development Committee of the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) established a collaboration to enhance simulation-based clinical teaching competence in cataract surgery. METHODS: Ten Mozambican ophthalmologists experienced in teaching cataract surgery participated in a group mentoring assisted 6 month/11 flipped-learning online experience on curriculum design, which included practice-based and social learning strategies, continuous bidirectional feedback, individual and group reflection opportunities, and the demonstration of declarative and procedural competencies. Program evaluation consisted of pre and post-test knowledge assessment; individual homework, informed by curated reading and a recorded lesson; feedback surveys for each module and one month after the program's conclusion, and a longitudinal project on creating a simulation-based education session on one step of cataract surgery. RESULTS: Participants a) highlighted the opportunity to advance their scholarly teaching skills as facilitators; b) showed an increase in knowledge post-test, expressed commitment to improve their learning experiences´ design, include interactive educational methods, and provide constructive feedback; and c) formed a sustained community of practice of ophthalmologists educators (CoP). CONCLUSION: This online faculty development program, assisted by group mentoring, held during the COVID-19 pandemic, facilitated the development of a CoP and was effective in enhancing teaching competence in curriculum design to apply in simulation-based learning environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cataract , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Teaching
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 328, 2022 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817216

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Aimed to corroborate students' and faculty's experiences with e-learning during the current pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June 2020. Seven surveys were distributed electronically to all undergraduate students and the faculty (4 to students and 3 to teachers) at the Southern Medical University (China). Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was set at p < .05. RESULTS: Most students had some exposure to e-learning prior to the all e-learning regiment, contrasted with close to 90% of teachers having no or very limited experience. Students' perceptions of the most helpful e-learning activities did not change significantly overall (Week 3 vs. Week 9). Approaching 60% of students (Week 9) did find online discussion/Q&A/forum helpful, an increase from less than 30% (Week 3). Among teachers, gaps emerged (Week 9) between e-teaching activities used and their perceived effectiveness. Despite pre-recorded lectures being the most frequently used method, the least gap was associated with live-stream lectures-the least used. Over time, teacher's perceived effectiveness of e-teaching vs. in-person teaching did not differ significantly overall. When the results among students (Week 7) and teachers (Week 9) were corroborated, a slightly higher percentage of teachers viewed online teaching to be less effective than in-person teaching and a slightly higher percentage of teachers viewed online teaching as far less effective. For preferred learning modes after the resumption of in-person learning, students' preferences did not differ significantly overall (Week 3 vs. week 9). Surveys conducted in Week 9 found that a slightly higher percentage of students (~ 70%) than teachers (~ 60%) preferred some forms of hybrid learning and a lower percentage of students preferred face-to-face learning only. Approximately three quarters of teachers responded that at least 50% of course materials could be mastered by students on their own. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the perceived effectiveness of e-learning among students and teachers has not changed significantly over time. Nor have students' preferences shifted significantly for various learning modes after the in-person learning resumed. However, informative directional trends have emerged. Our research illustrates empirically the need to corroborate students' and instructors' experiences over time to inform more holistic improvements of e-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Faculty , Humans , Students
14.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2068993, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815826

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to COVID-19, the AAMC recommended that hospitals conduct interviews in a virtual setting. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether fellowship video conference interviews (VCIs) are an acceptable alternative to in-person interviews from both the applicant and program perspectives. METHODS: Applicants and faculty from a single academic institution with five OBGYN subspecialty fellowship programs were invited to complete surveys regarding their experience using VCIs during the 2020 interview season. Survey responses used a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree). Comparative analyses between faculty and applicants responses to survey questions were performed with two-tailed Student's t-tests. RESULTS: 45 faculty members and 131 applicants received the survey. Response rate for faculty members and applicants was 95.6% (n = 43) and 46.6% (n = 61), respectively. Faculty and applicants agreed that the VCIs allowed them to accurately represent themselves (83.7% vs. 88.6%, p = 0.48). Most applicants (62.3%, n = 38) reported a fundamental understanding of the fellowship's culture. The majority of applicants (77.1%, n = 47) and faculty (72.1%, n = 31) agreed that they were able to develop connections during the virtual interview (p = 0.77). Faculty and applicants stated that VCIs assisted them in determining whether the candidate or program, respectively, was a good fit (83.7% vs. 67.2%, p = 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: The VCI fellowship recruitment process allowed OBGYN fellowship applicants and programs to accurately represent themselves compared to in-person interviews. Most applicants and faculty were able to develop relationships over the virtual platform. Although not explicitly assessed, it is possible that the virtual interviews can achieve a suitable match between applicant and program across all OBGYN subspecialty fellowships. The VCI process may be a long-term resolution to minimize both the financial burden and time commitment presented by traditional in-person interviews. Follow-up studies should assess the performance of the virtually selected fellows compared to those selected in previous years using traditional in-person interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Faculty , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans
15.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 14(4): 393-396, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814293

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The effects of COVID-19 will have a lasting impact on how work is conducted moving forward. Prior to the pandemic, work-life integration and well-being were priorities for many organizations, including pharmacy. The disruption associated with the COVID-19 pandemic pushed businesses and organizations worldwide into an era of agility and flexibility previously unknown to the majority of workplaces. PERSPECTIVE: Increased remote work has presented both increased challenges (e.g., engagement) and opportunities (e.g., productivity). After a year of experience, this shift in the nature of how work is done has provided an opportunity to reimagine how and where work will be conducted in the future. IMPLICATIONS: Schools and colleges of pharmacy have an opportunity to re-evaluate how academic and practice responsibilities are accomplished in regards to work life-integration and management of concurrent work and family responsibilities. Administration and faculty should foster a culture of transparency on this topic to collaboratively incorporate methods that better facilitate work-life integration moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmacy , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Schools, Pharmacy
16.
17.
Fam Med ; 54(3): 193-199, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732593

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, academic family physicians had to change their clinical, teaching, research, and administrative efforts, while simultaneously balancing their home environment demands. It is unclear how the changes in effort affected physicians' personal well-being, particularly burnout. This study sought to identify changes in faculty's clinical, teaching, research, and administrative efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic and how effort shifts were associated with burnout. We also examined associations with important demographics and burnout. METHODS: We took data from the 2020 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of family medicine educators and practicing physicians during November 2020 through December 2020. We analyzed self-report measures of demographics, effort (clinical, teaching, research, and administrative) before and during the pandemic, COVID-19 exposure level, and rates of burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) using logistic regressions. RESULTS: Most participants reported no change in efforts. If changes were reported, clinical (21.6%) and administrative (24.8%) efforts tended to increase from before to during the pandemic, while teaching tended to decrease (27.7%). Increases in teaching and clinical efforts were associated with higher rates of emotional exhaustion. Higher depersonalization was associated with increased clinical efforts. Being older and working in a rural setting was associated with lower burnout, while being female was associated with higher burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Shifts in effort across academic family physicians' multiple roles were associated with emotional exhaustion and, to a lesser degree, depersonalization. The high rates of burnout demand additional attention from directors and administrators, especially among female physicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty , Family Practice , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Physicians, Family
19.
Rev. bras. oftalmol ; 81: e0007, 2022. tab
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1716506

ABSTRACT

RESUMO Objetivo: Avaliar sintomas astenópicos e fatores sociodemográficos, hábitos comportamentais e clínicos nos docentes universitários durante a pandemia da COVID-19. Métodos: Trata-se de estudo transversal que avaliou a ocorrência de astenopia em 104 docentes. Questionários de sintomatologia visual validados foram adaptados para a coleta de dados. Houve comparação dos docentes quanto à ocorrência ou não de sintomas astenópicos, bem como foi aplicada regressão logística binária, para aferir a associação com variáveis independentes (p<0,05). Resultados: Houve maior aparecimento de sintomas astenópicos durante o período pandêmico, em que o tempo de exposição a telas parece ter sido o fator mais determinante. Além disso, os indivíduos com tempo de tela superior a 5 horas diárias, que faziam uso de telas para o lazer e usavam colírio/lubrificantes apresentaram significativamente maior chance de estar no grupo com sintomas astenópicos. Conclusão: Foi identificada associação significativa entre a ocorrência de sintomas astenópicos e o uso de telas durante o período pandêmico, principalmente nos grupos com maior duração do tempo de tela. O estudo chama atenção para a saúde ocular de docentes universitários em ensino remoto, além de suscitar novos estudos para investigação desse quadro em distintos ambientes escolares.


ABSTRACT Objective: To assess asthenopic symptoms and sociodemographic factors, behavioral and clinical aspects in college lecturers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study evaluating asthenopia in 104 lecturers. Some validated visual symptom questionnaires were adapted for data collection. Lecturers were compared regarding the occurrence or not of asthenopic symptoms, and binary logistic regression was applied to measure the association with independent variables (p<0.05). Results: Asthenopic symptoms occurred more often during the pandemic, when exposure to screens was a determinant factor. The individuals with screen time longer than five hours a day, who used screens for leisure, and who used eye drops/lubricants were significantly more likely to be in the group with asthenopic symptoms. Conclusion: A significant association was identified in occurrence of asthenopic symptoms and screen use during the pandemic period, especially in groups with longer screen time. The study draws attention to the eye health of college lecturers in distance learning, and the need for further research on this situation in different school environments.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Asthenopia/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Faculty , Universities , Computers , Xerophthalmia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Retrospective Studies , Internet , Diplopia/epidemiology , Eye Manifestations , Pandemics , Occupational Stress , COVID-19
20.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2040191, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The state of alarm declared in Spain in response to the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has had far-reaching consequences in all areas of life. At the University of Granada's (UGR) Faculty of Medicine, online teaching was implemented immediately without any preexisting plan. Second-year undergraduates in medicine, particularly those enrolled in the subject 'Bases of Internal Medicine,' would normally undergo clinical skills circuits in face-to-face group settings. OBJECTIVE: To facilitate undergraduates' acquisition of specific transversal skills by means of an integrated online working system. DESIGN: Before the pandemic, teaching/learning methods consisted of 1) face-to-face group work; 2) teletutoring; 3) written work uploaded to the PRADO online platform for marking by the teletutor; and 4) presentation of written work to the group. As a result of the lockdown, presentations in class were suspended and replaced by online presentations. The means adopted by students in online presentations were freely chosen using various communication techniques: linear projection systems (6); acting/simulation (4); dramatization (1); and role-playing (1). RESULTS: The number of online clinical skills circuits developed was 12, one for each of the clinical skills circuits established for imparting this subject. A total of 12 presentations were made by the 10 groups, each lasting 15 minutes followed by a 5-minute discussion to settle any questions raised. The presentations were marked jointly by the teaching staff, coordinator, and students. CONCLUSIONS: The transference of classroom learning to the online environment proved an essential resource for teaching/learning clinical/practical skills during the lockdown, which have never before been imparted at distance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Communicable Disease Control , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Students
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