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1.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2044635, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740618

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the pre-existing global crisis of physician burnout. Physician and particularly medical educator well-being, has come into focus as educators can influence their own and learners' well-being. Measuring this construct is one important step towards promoting well-being in the work and learning environments. The 5-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5) has been validated in different populations worldwide for assessing well-being. Yet, its psychometric acceptability remains unexplored among medical educators in Asia including Hong Kong (HK). This study evaluates the validity of the WHO-5 when used among HK medical educators. METHOD: Using data from 435 medical educators, we employed combined within-network (confirmatory factor analysis; CFA) and between-network approaches (correlation and regression) to scale validation. RESULTS: CFA results indicated that our data fit the a priori WHO-5 model, suggesting structural validity. Results of comparison of means indicated no gender differences, but there were significant differences when participants were compared by age and professional backgrounds. Resilience predicted well-being as measured by the WHO-5, suggesting construct criterion validity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings extend the validity evidence for the WHO-5 to HK medical educators examined in this study. This enables their well-being to be assessed when evaluating the impact of future well-being programmes.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical , Mental Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/epidemiology , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , World Health Organization
2.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1897267, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575983

ABSTRACT

During the spring semester of 2020, medical school anatomists in China were forced by the COVID-19 pandemic to transition from face-to-face educators or part-time online educators to full-time online educators. This nationwide survey was conducted to assess online anatomy education during the pandemic for medical students from nonclinical medicine and clinical medicine majors at medical schools in China via WeChat. The total of 356 responders included 293 responders from clinical medicine and 63 respondents from nonclinical medicine majors (i.e., 21 from preventive medicine, 13 from stomatology, and 29 from traditional Chinese medicine). The survey results showed that several aspects of online anatomy education were quite similar in clinical and nonclinical majors' classes, including theoretical and practical sessions, active learning, assessments and evaluations. However, there were statistically significant differences in class size, implementation of active learning activities prior to the pandemic, and the evaluation of the effectiveness of online learning during the pandemic, between clinical and nonclinical medicine majors. These results indicated that, compared with teachers of anatomy courses in clinical medicine, teachers of nonclinical medicine majors using online learning in medical schools in China had relatively poor preparation for online learning in response to the unforeseen pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Pandemics , China , Education, Distance , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1263-1267, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373679

ABSTRACT

The announcement of the closure of Philadelphia's Hahnemann University Hospital in June 2019 sent shock waves through the academic community. The closure had a devastating impact on the residents and fellows who trained there, the patients who had long received their care there, and faculty and staff who had provided care there for decades. Since its beginnings, the hospital, established as part of Hahnemann Medical College in 1885, was a major site for medical student education. The authors share the planning before and actions during the crisis that protected the educational experiences of third- and fourth-year medical students at Drexel University College of Medicine assigned to Hahnemann University Hospital. The lessons they learned can be helpful to leadership in academic health systems in the United States facing a diminishing number of clinical training sites for medical and other health professions students, a situation that is likely to worsen as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to weaken the health care ecosystem.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Health Facility Closure/methods , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Philadelphia , Students, Medical/psychology
5.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e412-e417, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the ACGME recommended all interviews for the 2021 residency application cycle be held virtually. Because this is major shift from neurosurgical interviews in past years, this study aims to evaluate both applicant and interviewer satisfaction of conducting interviews virtually. METHODS: For faculty, an 11-question online survey was sent to 116 United States neurosurgery training programs. A 14-question online survey was sent to 255 neurosurgery applicants. The resulting data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. RESULTS: From applicants, 118 responses were received. From faculty, 171 individual responses were received. Thirty-five percent (34.7%) of applicants agreed that they were satisfied with the virtual interview process as a whole. Although 44.5% of faculty disagreed with the statement "I would like to replace in-person interviews with virtual interviews in the future", 57.3% of faculty agreed that they were likely to implement virtual interviews in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Some things might be better assessed through in-person interviews, but there are clear benefits to virtual interviews. Future iterations of the interview process, incorporating virtual interviews, might help determine how and in which situations virtual interviews can be utilized in future residency application cycles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty, Medical/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Job Application , Neurosurgery/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Neurosurgery/education , Online Systems/trends , United States/epidemiology
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2120642, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355859

ABSTRACT

Importance: As medical faculty have central roles during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to study the pandemic's association with the vitality and careers of medical school faculty. Objective: To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected midcareer research faculty in academic medicine. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study included medical school faculty who participated in the C-Change Mentoring and Leadership Institute. All US medical school faculty recipients of recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) RO1, RO1-equivalent, and K awards were invited to apply to the institute. The 99 applicants who met inclusion criteria were stratified by degree (MD or MD/PhD vs PhD), gender, and race/ethnicity. Enrollment was offered to applicants randomly selected for 40 spots, demographically balanced by sex, underrepresented in medicine minority (URMM) status, and degree. In April 2020, an inquiry was emailed to faculty enrolled in the institute requesting responses to questions about meaning in work, career choice, and values. A qualitative analysis of narrative data responses, using grounded theory, was undertaken to determine key themes. This study is part of a NIH-funded randomized trial to test the efficacy of a group peer mentoring course for midcareer faculty and study the course's mechanisms of action. Main Outcomes and Measures: Key themes in data. Results: Of 40 enrolled participants, 39 responded to the inquiry, for a response rate of 97%. The analytic sample included 39 faculty members; 19 (47%) were women, 20 (53%) identified as URMM, and 20 (53%) had an MD or MD with PhD vs 19 (47%) with PhD degrees. Key themes in the data that emerged describing faculty lived experience of the pandemic included increased meaningfulness of work; professionalism and moral responsibility; enhanced relationships with colleagues; reassertion of career choice; disrupted research; impact on clinical work; attention to health disparities, social justice and advocacy; increased family responsibilities; psychological stress; and focus on leadership. Conclusions and Relevance: During the pandemic, diverse PhD and physician investigators reported increased meaningfulness in work and professionalism and enhanced relationships, all intrinsic motivators associated with vitality. Working during the pandemic appears to have produced intrinsic rewards positively associated with vitality, in addition to adverse mental health effects. These findings have implications for combatting burnout and retaining investigators in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Professionalism , Research Personnel/psychology , Adult , Career Choice , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(6): e2113539, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269080

ABSTRACT

Importance: How the COVID-19 pandemic has affected academic medicine faculty's work-life balance is unknown. Objective: To assess the association of perceived work-life conflict with academic medicine faculty intention to leave, reducing employment to part time, or declining leadership opportunities before and since the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Settings, and Participants: An anonymous online survey of medical, graduate, and health professions school faculty was conducted at a single large, urban academic medical center between September 1 and September 25, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Self-assessed intention to leave, reducing employment to part time, or turning down leadership opportunities because of work-life conflict before and since the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Of the 1186 of 3088 (38%) of faculty members who answered the survey, 649 (55%) were women and 682 (58%) were White individuals. Respondents were representative of the overall faculty demographic characteristics except for an overrepresentation of female faculty respondents and underrepresentation of Asian faculty respondents compared with all faculty (female faculty: 649 [55%] vs 1368 [44%]; Asian faculty: 259 [22%] vs 963 [31%]). After the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty were more likely to consider leaving or reducing employment to part time compared with before the pandemic (leaving: 225 [23%] vs 133 [14%]; P < .001; reduce hours: 281 [29%] vs 206 [22%]; P < .001). Women were more likely than men to reduce employment to part time before the COVID-19 pandemic (153 [28%] vs 44 [12%]; P < .001) and to consider both leaving or reducing employment to part time since the COVID-19 pandemic (leaving: 154 [28%] vs 56 [15%]; P < .001; reduce employment: 215 [40%] vs 49 [13%]; P < .001). Faculty with children were more likely to consider leaving and reducing employment since the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before the pandemic (leaving: 159 [29%] vs 93 [17%]; P < .001; reduce employment: 213 [40%] vs 130 [24%]; P < .001). Women with children compared with women without children were also more likely to consider leaving since the COVID-19 pandemic than before (113 [35%] vs 39 [17%]; P < .001). Working parent faculty and women were more likely to decline leadership opportunities both before (faculty with children vs without children: 297 [32%] vs 84 [9%]; P < .001; women vs men: 206 [29%] vs 47 [13%]; P < .001) and since the COVID-19 pandemic (faculty with children vs faculty without children: 316 [34%] vs 93 [10 %]; P < .001; women vs men: 148 [28%] vs 51 [14%]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey study, the perceived stressors associated with work-life integration were higher in women than men, were highest in women with children, and have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The association of both gender and parenting with increased perceived work-life stress may disproportionately decrease the long-term retention and promotion of junior and midcareer women faculty.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Perception , Work-Life Balance/standards , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Schools, Medical/standards , Schools, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Texas , Work-Life Balance/statistics & numerical data
8.
Clin Anat ; 34(6): 948-960, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230196

ABSTRACT

It is critical that academic opinion of pandemic pedagogy is comprehensively quantified in order to inform future practices. Thus, this study examines how anatomists in the United Kingdom (UK) and Republic of Ireland (ROI) perceive the teaching adaptations made in response to COVID-19, and how these adaptations have impacted their experiences teaching, their online work environment and community. Data was collected via a questionnaire from 24 anatomists across 15 universities in the UK (11) and ROI (4). With regards to teaching, 95.6% of academics have upskilled in new technologies to meet the demands of distance teaching. Academics (95.8%) preferred face-to-face delivery of practical sessions. Most universities (80.0%) reported that practical sessions will continue in a new form that ensures social distancing. However, 50.0% of academics are uncertain if these adaptations will improve student learning. Many anatomists believe that the new adaptations may hinder student-student (66.7%) and student-tutor (45.8%) interactions. Regarding assessment, 52.6% of academics preferred traditional methods to online. Remote online assessment was difficult to protect against collusion, but provided time saving opportunities for academics. Finally, in terms of working environment, 83.3% of academics stated that their workload increased; 54.2% preferred working on site rather than remotely and 79.2% think that staff interactions are better when working on site. These results demonstrate a widespread concern amongst anatomists regarding the pandemic-induced adaptations to teaching, assessment and working environment. However, important opportunities were also identified that could ultimately serve to benefit students and educators alike.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Distance , Faculty, Medical/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Ireland , Social Interaction , United Kingdom
9.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1919042, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192434

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 lockdowns have deeply impacted teaching programs. Online teaching has suddenly become the main form of medical education, a form that may be used as long as the pandemic continues. We aimed at analyzing how online teaching was perceived by both teachers and learners to help determine how to adapt curricula in the next few years. An anonymous cross-sectional survey of medical students, pediatric residents, neonatal fellows, and their respective teachers was conducted between June and August 2020 to assess feelings about quality, attendance, equivalence, and sustainability of online teaching programs. 146 Students and 26 teachers completed the survey. 89% of students agreed that the offered online teaching was an appropriate way of teaching during the pandemic. Less than half of learners and teachers felt they have received or provided a training of an equivalent level and quality as in usual courses. About one-third thought that this online teaching should continue after the crisis ends. Medical school students had significantly more mixed opinions on online teaching than residents and fellows did. Attendance of learners significantly improved with synchronous online classes (p < 0.001), and among more advanced learners (p < 0.002). Our study is the first of this kind to assess simultaneously the feelings of learners at different levels (medical students, residents, and fellows) and their respective teachers of pediatric on programs taught online. It showed that online programs were perceived as appropriate ways of teaching during the COVID pandemic. Further studies are, however, needed to assess the efficacy of such teaching methods on medical skills and communication capabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , France , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 974-978, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153257

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted medical research, pushing mentors and mentees to decide if COVID-19 research would be germane to the early career investigator's developing research portfolio. With COVID-19 halting hundreds of federal trials involving non-COVID-19 research, mentors and mentees must also consider the broader moral calling of contributing to COVID-19 research. At the time of writing, the National Institutes of Health had responded to the pandemic with significant funding for COVID-19 research. However, because this pandemic is a new phenomenon, few mentors have expertise in the disease and relevant established resources. As a result, many mentors are unable to provide insight on COVID-19 research to early career investigators considering a pivot toward research related to this disease. The authors suggest 4 ways for mentees and mentors to respond to the changes the pandemic has brought to research funding and opportunities: (1) include COVID-19 research in existing portfolios to diversify intellectual opportunities and reduce funding risks; (2) negotiate the mentor-mentee relationship and roles and expectations early in project discussions-considering, as relevant, the disproportionate burden of home responsibilities often borne by early career faculty members who are women and/or from a minority group; (3) address any mentor limitations in content expertise; and (4) if the decision is to pivot to COVID-19 research, select projects with implications generalizable beyond this pandemic to other infectious outbreaks or to the redesign of health care delivery. Mentors and mentees must weigh the relevance of COVID-19 research projects to the postpandemic world and the amount of available funding against the developing interests of early career investigators. Academic medical centers nationwide must enable seasoned and early career researchers to contribute meaningfully to COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Decision Making , Faculty, Medical , Mentoring , Mentors , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Mentoring/methods , Mentoring/organization & administration , Mentors/psychology , Research Support as Topic , United States
11.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc30, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110247

ABSTRACT

Objective: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic a large part of attendance in medical education became impossible for reasons of disease control. Teachers had to switch to online courses at short notice. The associated developmental push of digital teaching methods, such as online teaching, has anticipated changes, some of which are tantamount to establishment. This study examines the experiences and effects of these changes from the teachers' perspective. Methods: We conducted ten guideline-based anonymized e-mail interviews with lecturers of the Medical Faculty of the Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg. Questions were asked on the subject areas of advantages and disadvantages, teaching experience and the future of digital teaching. The qualitative evaluation was based on Mayring. Results: The assessment of the digitization of face-to-face courses could be described by the inductively formed categories "social aspects", "methodological aspects", "institutional aspects", "technical aspects" and "temporal-spatial aspects". These revealed in particular concerns about the lack of personal exchange, temporal-spatial advantages, technical barriers and disagreement about the future role of digital teaching. Conclusion: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, face-to-face courses were replaced by online teaching, which is currently an accepted part of the curriculum. The results show, that teachers were able to implement the comprehensive ad-hoc digitization of theoretical courses well, although previously known problem areas were aggravated. Furthermore, a fundamental examination of the future role of digitized courses in medical education must take place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Acad Med ; 96(5): 632-634, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104983

ABSTRACT

The well-being movement in medical education has been underway for over a decade. It seems appropriate to examine and evaluate these efforts to support the mental health needs of learners, faculty, and staff as medicine and medical education evolve in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. To date, most interventions intended to promote well-being have focused on individual strategies rather than environmental drivers of distress, and the primary offerings have comprised strategies such as mindfulness, meditation, yoga, nutrition, exercise, and sleep. Responses to this programming from medical learners have primarily ranged from ambivalence to resentment, with many feeling that the programming failed to adequately address their particular needs and the challenges they were experiencing. In this commentary, the author challenges the assumption that well-being per se should be the ideal target or goal. Learners and faculty may be better served by considering other goals-those that do not focus directly on well-being but that are instead foundational for well-being in that they directly address the challenges that students, residents, and faculty are facing. In other words, goals and associated interventions would focus on the experience of school and work rather than focusing primarily on encouraging healthy practices outside of school and work. The author proposes using the lens of satisfaction through which to view and assess progress toward well-being, increasing satisfaction within 3 interconnected domains: (1) school and/or work, (2) self, and (3) life in general. Attention to these domains may be more likely to produce improvements in well-being that have been sought for years but that remain elusive.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Internship and Residency , Personal Satisfaction , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Ann Surg ; 273(3): e91-e96, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066513

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the stress levels and experience of academic surgeons by training status (eg, housestaff or faculty). BACKGROUND: Covid-19 has uniquely challenged and changed the United States healthcare system. A better understanding of the surgeon experience is necessary to inform proactive workforce management and support. METHODS: A multi-institutional, cross-sectional telephone survey of surgeons was conducted across 5 academic medical centers from May 15 to June 5, 2020. The exposure of interest was training status. The primary outcome was maximum stress level, measured using the validated Stress Numerical Rating Scale-11 (range 0-10). RESULTS: A total of 335 surveys were completed (49.3% housestaff, 50.7% faculty; response rate 63.7%). The mean maximum stress level of faculty was 7.21 (SD 1.81) and of housestaff was 6.86 (SD 2.06) (P = 0.102). Mean stress levels at the time of the survey trended lower amongst housestaff (4.17, SD 1.89) than faculty (4.56, SD 2.15) (P = 0.076). More housestaff (63.6%) than faculty (40.0%) reported exposure to individuals with Covid-19 (P < 0.001). Subjects reported inadequate personal protective equipment in approximately a third of professional exposures, with no difference by training status (P = 0.557). CONCLUSIONS: During the early months of the Covid-19 pandemic, the personal and professional experiences of housestaff and faculty differed, in part due to a difference in exposure as well as non-work-related stressors. Workforce safety, including adequate personal protective equipment, expanded benefits (eg, emergency childcare), and deliberate staffing models may help to alleviate the stress associated with disease resurgence or future disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty, Medical/psychology , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency , Medical Staff/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
14.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(6): 1413-1421, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the global outbreak of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), plastic surgeons were forced to transition from traditional didactics to virtual lectures to practice "social distancing." As this method of education continues to be widely used, understanding the current trend of its usage is critical. In this study, we performed a survey study of virtual lecture attendees and presenters to determine current usage and general consensus on virtual lectures in plastic surgery education. METHODS: An electronic survey was sent to attendees and presenters of virtual lectures using Google Forms. Demographic data, webinar usage patterns, and views on virtual lectures were collected. RESULTS: A total of 417 surveys were received. Prior to the COVID-19 era, 39.1percent of attendees did not use virtual lectures and 45.6percent of presenters did not give webinars at all. Both groups reported that the lack of opportunities and need were the most common cause of no use of lectures or webinars. After the outbreak, 35.4percent of attendees now use virtual lectures daily and 51.4percent of presenters give lectures weekly. Over 90percent of the study population reported a positive experience with the virtual lectures due to increased interaction, convenience, outreach, and usability. Finally, over 75percent stated that virtual lectures might replace classroom lectures in the future. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that a majority of plastic surgeons have begun to use and give virtual lectures daily after the COVID-19 outbreak. Virtual education is a powerful and versatile tool that has great potentials, and it may continue to serve as a part of surgical training in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/trends , Pandemics , Surgery, Plastic/education , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Perception , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology
15.
Work ; 67(4): 791-798, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the self-perceived competency (FSPC) of medical faculty in E-Teaching and support received during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online well-structured and validated faculty self-perceived competency questionnaire was used to collect responses from medical faculty. The questionnaire consisted of four purposely build sections on competence in student engagement, instructional strategy, technical communication and time management. The responses were recorded using a Likert ordinal scale (1-9). The Questionnaire was uploaded at www.surveys.google.com and the link was distributed through social media outlets and e-mails. Descriptive statistics and Independent paired t-test were used for analysis and comparison of quantitative and qualitative variables. A p-value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 738 responses were assessed. Nearly 54% (397) participants had less than 5 years of teaching experience, 24.7% (182) had 6-10 years and 11.7% (86) had 11-15 years teaching expertise. 75.6% (558) respondents have delivered online lectures during the pandemic. Asynchronous methods were used by 61% (450) and synchronous by 39% (288) of participants. Moreover, 22.4% (165) participants revealed that their online lectures were evaluated by a structured feedback from experts, while 38.3% participants chose that their lectures were not evaluated. A significant difference (p < 0.01) was found between FSPC scores and online teaching evaluation by experts. The mean score of FSPC scale was 5.62±1.15. The mean score for student's engagement, instructional strategies, technical communication and time management were of 5.18±1.60, 5.67±1.61, 5.49±1.71 and 6.12±1.67 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Medical faculty members were found somewhat competent in E-teaching for student engagement, instructional strategy, technical communication and time management skills. Faculty receiving feedback was more competent in comparison to peers teaching without feedback.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Professional Competence , Self Concept , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Female , Formative Feedback , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/psychology , Time Management
16.
Am J Surg ; 222(3): 473-480, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted surgical training nationwide. Our former curricula will likely not return, and training will need to adapt, so we are able to graduate residents of the same caliber as prior to the pandemic. METHODS: A survey evaluating perceptions of changes made in surgical training was conducted on surgery residents and attendings. RESULTS: Disaster medicine training has become more relevant and 85% residents and 75% attendings agreed it should be incorporated into the curriculum. Safety of family was the most significant concern of residents. Virtual curriculum was perceived to be acceptable by 82% residents and only 22% attendings (p < 0.01). Residents (37%) were less concerned than attendings (61%) of falling behind on their overall training (p = 0.04). Both groups agreed operative skills would be adversely affected (56%vs72%; p = 0.37). CONCLUSIONS: To maintain an effective surgical curriculum, programs will need to implement new educational components to better prepare residents to become surgeons of the future.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , California , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Family , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Middle Aged , Safety , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc97, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000039

ABSTRACT

Background: The task of the Competence Centers for vocational training (KW) is to increase the attractiveness and quality of vocational (=post-graduate) training in general practice. For this purpose, they offer, among other things, a structured seminar program for post-graduate trainees in general practice (GP-trainees). During the Covid-19 pandemic the seminar program of the KWBW-Verbundweiterbildungplus® in Baden-Württemberg was converted to digital formats. The goal of the paper is to evaluate the acceptance by the GP-trainees and lecturers, to describe experiences with the conversion to e-learning and to derive recommendations with regard to the future orientation of seminar programs in post-graduate as well as continuing medical education. The implementation was based on a modified Kern-cycle and aimed at offering eight teaching units of 45 minutes each to a large number of GP-trainees. It tried to maintain the high quality of content and education as well as the interactive character of the previous seminars. For this purpose, the events were designed as synchronous webinars (six units) with asynchronous preparation and post-processing (two units) according to the flipped classroom method. The evaluation by the participating GP-trainees and lecturers was performed online using a multi-center developed and pre-piloted questionnaire. Results and discussion: N=101 GP-trainees participated in the evaluation of five individual seminar days in the second quarter of 2020 (response rate 97%). 58% (N=59) of the trainees were satisfied or very satisfied with the implementation. 82% (n=83) rated pre-tasks as helpful. 99% (n=100) would participate in an online seminar again. For 52% (n=53) of the trainees, the attitude towards e-learning had changed positively. The main advantages mentioned were no travel, save in time and costs as well as increased flexibility. The main disadvantages mentioned were less personal interaction and technical obstacles. The high acceptance of the new digital format showed the fundamental potential of e-learning in continuing medical education. The experiences can be a source of inspiration for other departments and KW. However, it also shows that important goals of KW, such as the personal interaction of the peer group, could not be achieved. In the future, it is important to develop a suitable mix of presence and digital formats with the aim to improve the attractiveness as well as sustainability of continuing medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , General Practice/education , Adult , Clinical Competence , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology
18.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc65, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970003

ABSTRACT

Introduction and objectives: The Covid-19 pandemic has created major challenges for university teaching. At the beginning of the summer semester 2020, teaching at the Medical Faculty in Magdeburg was almost completely online. Also the course in macroscopic anatomy had to be replaced by virtual e-learning offers. Methods: Videos and photo presentations of the preparation steps and structures to be displayed were made available online. The reactions of the students showed very quickly that the three-dimensionality, the independent preparation and the haptics of the object to be studied make up a large part of this subject. Results and conclusions: Virtual e-learning offerings are a useful supplement to, but not a substitute for, active dissecting on body donors. By changing the course offerings in compliance with hygiene and distance rules, we were able to offer a classroom course again during the semester, which was expressly welcomed by the students.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Consumer Behavior , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Time Factors
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