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3.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
4.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e26330, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 led to the COVID-19 pandemic starting in January 2020. The Swiss Federal Council prescribed a lockdown of nonessential businesses. Students and employees of higher education institutions had to install home offices and participate in online lectures. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this survey study was to evaluate lifestyle habits, such as physical activity (PA), sitting time, nutritional habits (expressed as median modified Mediterranean Diet Score [mMDS]), alcohol consumption habits, and sleeping behavior during a 2-month period of confinement and social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey participants were students and employees of a Swiss university of applied sciences. METHODS: All students and employees from Bern University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Professions (ie, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, and physiotherapy divisions) were invited to complete an anonymous online survey during the COVID-19 confinement period. Information on the lifestyle dimensions of PA, sitting time, nutritional and alcohol consumption habits, and sleep behavior was gathered using adaptations of validated questionnaires. Frequency analyses and nonparametric statistical methods were used for data analysis. Significance was set at 5% α level of error. RESULTS: Prevalence of non-health-enhancing PA was 37.1%, with participants of the division of physiotherapy showing the lowest prevalence. Prevalence of long sitting time (>8 hours/day) was 36.1%. The median mMDS was 9, where the maximal score was 15, with participants of the division of nutrition and dietetics being more adherent to a Mediterranean diet as compared to the other groups. Prevalence of nonadherence to the Swiss alcohol consumption recommendations was 8.3%. Prevalence of low sleeping quality was 44.7%, while the median sleeping duration was 8 hours, which is considered healthy for adult populations. CONCLUSIONS: In the group analysis, differences in PA, sitting time, and mMDS were observed between different divisions of health professions as well as between Bachelor of Science students, Master of Science students, and employees. Therefore, public health messages regarding healthy lifestyle habits during home confinement should be more group specific. The results of this study may provide support for the implementation of group-specific health promotion interventions at universities in pandemic conditions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04502108; https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04502108.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Faculty/psychology , Feeding Behavior , Quarantine , Sleep , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
6.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 9(3): e24275, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced drastic changes to daily life, from the implementation of stay-at-home orders to mandating facial coverings and limiting in-person gatherings. While the relaxation of these control measures has varied geographically, it is widely agreed that contact tracing efforts will play a major role in the successful reopening of businesses and schools. As the volume of positive cases has increased in the United States, it has become clear that there is room for digital health interventions to assist in contact tracing. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of a mobile-friendly app designed to supplement manual COVID-19 contact tracing efforts on a university campus. Here, we present the results of a development and validation study centered around the use of the MyCOVIDKey app on the Vanderbilt University campus during the summer of 2020. METHODS: We performed a 6-week pilot study in the Stevenson Center Science and Engineering Complex on Vanderbilt University's campus in Nashville, TN. Graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and staff >18 years who worked in Stevenson Center and had access to a mobile phone were eligible to register for a MyCOVIDKey account. All users were encouraged to complete regular self-assessments of COVID-19 risk and to key in to sites by scanning a location-specific barcode. RESULTS: Between June 17, 2020, and July 29, 2020, 45 unique participants created MyCOVIDKey accounts. These users performed 227 self-assessments and 1410 key-ins. Self-assessments were performed by 89% (n=40) of users, 71% (n=32) of users keyed in, and 48 unique locations (of 71 possible locations) were visited. Overall, 89% (202/227) of assessments were determined to be low risk (ie, asymptomatic with no known exposures), and these assessments yielded a CLEAR status. The remaining self-assessments received a status of NOT CLEAR, indicating either risk of exposure or symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 (7.5% [n=17] and 3.5% [n=8] of self-assessments indicated moderate and high risk, respectively). These 25 instances came from 8 unique users, and in 19 of these instances, the at-risk user keyed in to a location on campus. CONCLUSIONS: Digital contact tracing tools may be useful in assisting organizations to identify persons at risk of COVID-19 through contact tracing, or in locating places that may need to be cleaned or disinfected after being visited by an index case. Incentives to continue the use of such tools can improve uptake, and their continued usage increases utility to both organizational and public health efforts. Parameters of digital tools, including MyCOVIDKey, should ideally be optimized to supplement existing contact tracing efforts. These tools represent a critical addition to manual contact tracing efforts during reopening and sustained regular activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Electronic Data Processing , Mobile Applications , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Contact Tracing/methods , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Pilot Projects , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Tennessee/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
7.
Anat Sci Educ ; 14(1): 8-18, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938394

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic launched the use of online courses in Chinese medical schools during February 2020. To evaluate the state of gross anatomy education in China during the pandemic, a nationwide survey was conducted through convenience sampling by email or respondent invitations on social media. A total of 359 questionnaires were received from the respondents. The first response from a given school was included in the study to represent that school, thus, 77 questionnaires were used for analyses. Schools represented were from all provinces in mainland China as well as Hong Kong and Macao. The survey found that before the pandemic, 74.0% and 33.8% of the 77 schools conducted online theoretical and practical sessions, respectively, on gross anatomy, and 36 (46.8% of 77) had temporarily suspended practical sessions at the time the survey was conducted. Body donation programs were also affected with 26.0% and 27.3% of the 77 schools having suspended donation programs or saw a decreased number of donations. During the pandemic, 40.3% of the 77 schools kept or initiated the implementation of active learning, and online assessment was continued in 49.4% of the 77 medical schools. Another 26 (33.8%) schools initiated online assessment during the pandemic. A total of 359 answers were included for the analysis of the "teachers' perception of the online teaching experience." Over half (51.0%) of the 359 responded teachers were very statisfied or satisfied with the effectiveness of online teaching during the pandemic. A total of 36.2% of these respondents preferred to implement online teaching of theoretical sessions after the pandemic, and 89 (24.8%) teachers were keen to return to traditional face-to-face anatomy education.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , China , Curriculum/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum/trends , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/trends , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Schools, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Schools, Medical/trends , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/trends
8.
J Surg Res ; 259: 326-331, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, many Pediatric Surgery Fellowship programs were forced to convert their normal in-person interviews into virtual interviews. This study sought to determine the perceived value of virtual interviews for Pediatric Surgery Fellowship. METHODS: An anonymous survey was distributed to the applicants and faculty at a university-affiliated, free-standing children's hospital with a Pediatric Surgery fellowship program that conducted one of three interview days using a virtual format. RESULTS: All applicants who responded to the survey had at least one interview that was converted to a virtual interview. Faculty (75%) and applicants (87.5%) preferred in-person interviews over virtual interviews; most applicants (57%) did not feel they got to know the program as well with the virtual format. Applicants and faculty felt that virtual interviews could potentially be used as a screening tool in the future (7/10 Likert) but did not recommend they be used as a complete replacement for in-person interviews (3.5-5/10 Likert). Applicants were more likely than faculty to report that interview type influenced their final rank list (5 versus 3/10 Likert). CONCLUSIONS: Faculty and applicants preferred in-person interviews and did not recommend that virtual interviews replace in-person interviews. As the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic continues, more virtual interviews will be necessary, and innovations may be necessary to ensure an optimal interview process. TYPE OF STUDY: Survey. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: N/A.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Videoconferencing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
11.
J Affect Disord ; 277: 153-158, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712244

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anxiety and explore its factors during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic among the teachers in China. METHODS: We involved 88611 teachers (response rate: 94.75%) from three cities of Henan Province, China, during February 4, 2020 and February 12, 2020. Anxiety was assessed by using Generalized Anxiety Disorder tool (GAD-7). Odds ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence intervals (CI) for potential factors of anxiety were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anxiety was 13.67%. The prevalence was higher for women than men (13.89% vs. 12.93%). The highest prevalence of anxiety was 14.06% (SE 2.51%) with age of 60 to 100 years in men, and 14.70% (SE 0.56%) with age of 50 to 60 years in women. Participants located in country-level city school had the lowest prevalence of anxiety across all age categories (12.01% for age of 18-30 years; 12.50% for age of 30-40 years; 12.13% for age of 40-50 years; 9.52% for age of 60-100 years). After adjusting for potential confounders, age, sex, education status, type of teachers, school location, information source, worried level, fear level, and behavior status were found to be associated with anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This large-scale study assessed the prevalence of anxiety in teachers, as well as its potential influence of factors, which is useful for international and national decision-makers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , School Teachers/psychology , Sex Factors , Young Adult
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