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1.
Am J Public Health ; 112(12): 1735-1737, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141108
2.
J Dr Nurs Pract ; 15(3): 144-149, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141073

ABSTRACT

Background: Family health plays a vital role in the self-care and lifestyle modifications in families living with heart failure. Objective: To investigate the family health of patients with heart failure and their family members before and during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Method: This was a cross-sectional study design. We included 34 participants before and 34 participants during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Independent t-tests were conducted for comparison of the mean scores of the family health and its dimensions. Results: There was no significant difference between the total score of family health during the first COVID-19 lockdown compared to before the first COVID-19 lockdown in patients and family members. However, the values and ill-being dimensions of family health in patients and ill-being dimension in family members were significantly decreased during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Conclusion: This study indicated the positive and negative impacts of COVID-19 lockdown on family health. Implications for Nursing: Our results may help nurses to identify vulnerable patients with a low level of family health to tailor the best support to them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health , Communicable Disease Control , Family , Heart Failure/epidemiology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116189

ABSTRACT

Despite evidence suggesting that the COVID pandemic has negatively affected the mental health and well-being of school aged children and parents, there are limited studies describing the state of family well-being. This study aimed to use the family health lens to assess the well-being of Thai families with primary school children and to identify its associated factors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during January and March 2022, a period of school closure when onsite education was replaced by online education from time to time. The family health scale (FHS) questionnaire survey was carried out among 701 parents of Thai families with primary school children. The questionnaire comprised 10 questions regarding family belief, health, relationships, financial security, and housing environment. Independent variables included: (1) parental/household factors; (2) online learning related issues; (3) children's mental health; and (4) parents' health behaviors. Multinomial logistic regression was undertaken. Results showed that half of Thai families (54.6%) reported having moderate health status. Factors that were associated with lower levels of family health, such as poor or moderate levels, included families with a child that had mental health problems (adjusted odd ratio (AOR) = 5.0 [95% CI = 2.6-9.5] for poor v. excellent, and AOR = 2.7 [95% CI = 1.9-4.0] for moderate v. excellent), single parents (AOR = 2.5 [95% CI = 1.2-5.2] for poor v. excellent), a higher number (≥3) of children (AOR = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.0-4.0] for moderate v. excellent), and smoking parents (AOR = 6.5 [95% CI =1.2-34.8] for poor v. excellent). During health emergencies, health policy for providing adequate assistance to single parents, especially those that have a child with mental health problems, is of utmost importance. The design of health promotion activities and interventions should be targeted not only at single families, but also families with higher numbers of children and parents who smoke at home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Health , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Thailand/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Schools
4.
Healthc Policy ; 17(2): 72-89, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113944

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper was to identify continuations and changes in care delivery methods in primary care teams during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: The study used a cross-sectional, web-based survey comprising close-ended and open-ended questions. SETTING: The setting comprised family health teams (FHTs) across Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: The participants included executive directors of FHTs or designates of their choosing. SURVEY: Descriptive statistics were derived from responses to close-ended questions, and responses to open-ended questions were coded using thematic analysis. RESULTS: With 93 participants, the response rate was 48%. Participants reported the continuation of in-person care, the implementation of virtual care across FHTs and collaboration within these teams and their communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Ontario , Pandemics , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032977

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted multiple racial and ethnic minority groups, including Latinos residing in rural communities. Low rates of vaccination and testing combined with social determinants of health have contributed significantly to this disparate impact. Given the needs and constraints unique to rural Latino migrant and immigrant communities, this qualitative study examined multilevel barriers and strategies that affect COVID-19 vaccination and testing uptake among these communities in southwest Florida. Four focus groups (n = 25) were conducted between March and April 2021 with various key stakeholders, including rural Latino community members, local leaders, and community health workers ('Promotoras de Salud'). Themes that aligned with barriers to COVID-19 vaccination and testing included fear, lack of control, misinformation, lack of accessibility, and institutional/policy issues; themes that aligned with strategies to improve COVID-19 vaccination and testing uptake included faith, taking care of self, and community and family resilience. Recommendations for improving future pandemic responses for rural Latino communities include incorporating multiple levels of intervention, such as consideration of the role of the family, involving trusted community members, and ensuring the development and implementation of fair and consistent policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Ethnicity , Family Health , Florida/epidemiology , Hispanic or Latino , Humans , Minority Groups , Pandemics , Rural Population , Vaccination
7.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0265406, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore factors affecting family health management during home quarantine as well as the effects of variations in family health management (FHM) on individuals' health status. METHODS: Using stratified random sampling, 618 families in Wuhan as well as cities within its surrounding provinces were recruited and surveyed online. Latent class variables were extracted from four modules: disinfection, space layout, physical exercise, and food reserves. The analysis was conducted using the poLCA package in R software (v.4.1.0). Chi-squared tests, Fisher's exact tests, and non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare groups as appropriate. RESULTS: We found an overall questionnaire reliability of 0.77 and a total omega of 0.92, indicating that the survey results were credible. The Bayesian information criterion and Akaike information criterion were used to identified four latent class variables, namely latent non-family health management (18.9%) and latent low, medium, and advanced FHM (30.93%, 29.49%, and 20.59%, respectively). Gender, household income level, body mass index, the presence of a nearby community hospital, and self-rated health status showed statistically significant differences with respect to latent FHM. Moreover, we found a statistically significant difference in emotional reactions when comparing latent advanced and low to mid-level latent FHM. Compared with latent non-family health managers, we detected statistically significant differences in individual energy levels between potential family health managers at latent low and medium levels. Additionally, we found statistically significant differences in individual energy levels between latent advanced and low level family health managers. CONCLUSIONS: We found that multiple factors, including gender, household income, and body mass index, were correlated with latent FHM during home quarantine. We conclude that FHM can meaningfully improve individuals' health. Thus, increasing social support for individuals can improve FHM as well as individuals' health during home quarantine.


Subject(s)
Family Health , Quarantine , Bayes Theorem , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Social Support
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862794

ABSTRACT

Prior studies have examined how stress and the family environment affect overeating, but less is known about how COVID-19 stressors and family health may affect overeating during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research questions included: (1) Did COVID-19-related stressors increase the risk for overeating among adults in the United States? (2) Did family health protect against overeating during a pandemic? The sample included 443 participants aged 18 years and older living in the United States who were recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Stata version 16 was used to analyze the data using multiple linear regression. The results indicate that one year into the pandemic, COVID-19 stressors were associated with increased overeating, even after adjusting for overeating before the pandemic. More family health resources were associated with less overeating. These results indicate that although COVID-19 stressors were associated with overeating, greater family health resources helped prevent overeating. Interventions and policies that aim to increase health resources for families may be particularly beneficial at preventing overeating and obesity in the face of long- and short-term stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family Health , Humans , Hyperphagia/complications , Hyperphagia/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792714

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted and is still impacting people's lives, including physical and mental health. Family plays an important role in adolescent mental health due to the long staying at home. AIMS: This paper aimed to investigate the impact of family resilience on adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the mediation role of pandemic stress perception and the moderation role of meta-mood. METHODS: A total of 2691 Chinese adolescents were recruited using convenient sampling. Their mental health, family resilience, pandemic stress perception and meta-mood were surveyed. Multivariate statistics were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Our results showed that (1) about 36.7% adolescents in our sample have some mental health problems; (2) family resilience can positively predict adolescent mental health, whereas pandemic stress perception can negatively predict mental health; (3) pandemic stress perception mediates the relationship between family resilience and adolescent mental health; (4) meta-mood moderates the relationship between family resilience and pandemic perception, i.e., the first half of the mediation role. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that one can either improve family resilience or improve adolescents' meta-mood to relieve adolescents' mental health problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family Health , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e052955, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774954

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Family physicians are usually patients' first point of contact with primary healthcare. This study aims to understand the experiences of family physicians who were infected with the COVID-19 and started working again. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: This qualitative study was conducted on 18 different family health centres in Adana. Data collection was performed through 18 interviews, each lasting an average of 46.6 min. The data were analysed using the qualitative content analysis method. PARTICIPANTS: The study included 18 family physicians (9 women and 9 men), and there were no significant differences between them by gender or seniority. RESULTS: The results of the study have shown that family physicians who were infected with the COVID-19 and started working again have experienced high levels of anxiety at work. In addition, due to the fear of being reinfected, family physicians' social relations with their colleagues have decreased. The results are discussed under two themes: anxieties and social relationships. CONCLUSION: In primary healthcare services, family physicians play a vital role during the pandemic. Many family physicians either lost their lives or got infected with the virus, recovered and worked in difficult conditions for a long time. Understanding the experiences of family physicians during the pandemic when they underwent COVID-19 and after they recovered could help to protect their psychological health and improve their work conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Family , Family Health , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
11.
J Nutr Educ Behav ; 54(6): 540-550, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773517

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the weight-related family functioning of racial minority families with low income using family systems theory as an interpretive framework. DESIGN: Primarily a qualitative study with interviews plus; descriptive demographics, anthropometrics, a family functioning measure, and food insecurity screening. SETTING: Telephone interviews with families of preschool-aged children in an urban setting. PARTICIPANTS: Primary caregivers of preschool-aged children. PHENOMENON OF INTEREST: Cultural impacts on family systems. ANALYSIS: Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and loaded into NVivo 12 for thematic analysis. Descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The 23 participants were mothers and 2 maternal grandmothers. Seventy-four percent were African American, most children were normal weight (n = 15, 65%), mean family function scores were high, and more than half the families were at risk for food insecurity (n = 13, 56%). Acculturation and intergenerational eating-related cultural dimensions were discerned as the overarching themes influencing family cohesion. Family cohesion appeared to have helped the families adapt to the impact of coronavirus disease 2019. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Cultural dimensions such as acculturation and intergenerational influences appeared to be associated with social cohesion and family functioning around weight-related behaviors for these families. These findings add cultural and family resilience dimensions to family systems theory in nutrition interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Child , Child, Preschool , Exercise , Family Health , Female , Humans , Mothers
12.
JAMA ; 327(11): 1042-1050, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763144

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Persistent physical and mental disorders are frequent in survivors of COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, data on these disorders among family members are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between patient hospitalization for COVID-19 ARDS vs ARDS from other causes and the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related symptoms in family members. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort study in 23 intensive care units (ICUs) in France (January 2020 to June 2020 with final follow-up ending in October 2020). ARDS survivors and family members (1 family member per patient) were enrolled. EXPOSURES: Family members of patients hospitalized for ARDS due to COVID-19 vs ARDS due to other causes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was family member symptoms of PTSD at 90 days after ICU discharge, measured by the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (score range, 0 [best] to 88 [worst]; presence of PTSD symptoms defined by score >22). Secondary outcomes were family member symptoms of anxiety and depression at 90 days assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (score range, 0 [best] to 42 [worst]; presence of anxiety or depression symptoms defined by subscale scores ≥7). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the association between COVID-19 status and outcomes. RESULTS: Among 602 family members and 307 patients prospectively enrolled, 517 (86%) family members (median [IQR] age, 51 [40-63] years; 72% women; 48% spouses; 26% bereaved because of the study patient's death; 303 [50%] family members of COVID-19 patients) and 273 (89%) patients (median [IQR] age, 61 [50-69] years; 34% women; 181 [59%] with COVID-19) completed the day-90 assessment. Compared with non-COVID-19 ARDS, family members of patients with COVID-19 ARDS had a significantly higher prevalence of symptoms of PTSD (35% [103/293] vs 19% [40/211]; difference, 16% [95% CI, 8%-24%]; P < .001), symptoms of anxiety (41% [121/294] vs 34% [70/207]; difference, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; P= .05), and symptoms of depression (31% [91/291] vs 18% [37/209]; difference, 13% [95% CI, 6%-21%]; P< .001). In multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, and level of social support, COVID-19 ARDS was significantly associated with increased risk of PTSD-related symptoms in family members (odds ratio, 2.05 [95% CI, 1.30 to 3.23]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among family members of patients hospitalized in the ICU with ARDS, COVID-19 disease, as compared with other causes of ARDS, was significantly associated with increased risk of symptoms of PTSD at 90 days after ICU discharge. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04341519.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Health , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
13.
Transl Behav Med ; 12(3): 466-479, 2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705832

ABSTRACT

To describe how social disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic impacted child access to healthcare and child health behaviors in 2020. We used mixed-methods to conduct surveys and in-depth interviews with English- and Spanish-speaking parents of young children from five geographic regions in the USA. Participants completed the COVID-19 Exposure and Family Impact Survey (CEFIS). Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted between August and October 2020. Of the 72 parents interviewed, 45.8% of participants were Hispanic, 20.8% Black (non-Hispanic), and 19.4% White (non-Hispanic). On the CEFIS, the average (SD) number of social/family disruptions reported was 10.5 (3.8) out of 25. Qualitative analysis revealed multiple levels of themes that influenced accessing healthcare during the pandemic, including two broad contextual themes: (a) lack of trustworthiness of medical system/governmental organizations, and (b) uncertainty due to lack of consistency across multiple sources of information. This context influenced two themes that shaped the social and emotional environments in which participants accessed healthcare: (a) fear and anxiety and (b) social isolation. However, the pandemic also had some positive impacts on families: over 80% indicated that the pandemic made it "a lot" or "a little" better to care for their new infants. Social and family disruptions due to COVID-19 were common. These disruptions contributed to social isolation and fear, and adversely impacted multiple aspects of child and family health and access to healthcare. Some parents of infants reported improvements in specific health domains such as parenting, possibly due to spending more time together.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Delivery of Health Care , Family Health , Humans , Infant , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Affect Disord ; 303: 74-81, 2022 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak had rapidly become a global health threat, and its impact on the mental health was transmitted among different populations, especially from parents to children. The study aimed to investigate Chinese parents' influence on their children, in terms of mental health and lifestyles (screen time and physical exercise), during the COVID-19. METHODS: Self-reported online questionnaires of depression, anxiety, COVID-19 related worries, physical exercise, and screen time were completed by 3471 Chinese children and one of their parents (1514 fathers and 1957 mothers), during the COVID-19 epidemic in February 2020. Path analysis was used to examine the extent of transmission of psychological distress and whether lifestyles tied to transmission. RESULTS: During the quarantine, Chinese parents' depression and anxiety both positively predicted their children's depression and anxiety; parents' COVID-19 related worries, physical exercise and screen time separately had positive effects on children's COVID-19 related worries, physical exercise and screen time; parents' depression and anxiety were positively influenced by their COVID-19 related worries, self-quarantine and quarantine of family members, relatives or friends; children's depression and anxiety positively predicted their non-suicidal self-injury and suicide ideation. Bootstrap analyses showed that parents' COVID-19 related worries and lifestyles increased children's depression and anxiety via children's COVID-19 related worries and lifestyles, as well as parents' depression and anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: When families face to public events, parents' psychological distress and lifestyles are related to children's psychological stress and lifestyles. Interventions of parents' psychological distress and lifestyles would improve family resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Resilience, Psychological , Child , Family Health , Female , Humans , Life Style , Parents/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
15.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 75Suppl. 3(Suppl. 3): e20210203, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622411

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to map available evidence on parental burnout theme. METHOD: scoping review as according to the Joanna Briggs Institute. Search in January 2021, in six databases of publications in English, Portuguese or Spanish, without time limits. Data extracted and descriptively analyzed by three independent researchers. RESULTS: 374 articles were identified and 20 were included in the final sample, all published in English, from 2017 onwards. Parental burnout is a complex, multifactorial problem, distinct from burnout cases, depressive symptoms and other mental health alterations. It affects 0.2 to 20% of parents, has validated and suitable instruments for measurement; if not treated, can have consequences on marital life, work relationships, child neglect and violence. CONCLUSIONS: this is a recent theme that needs to be explored, due to the possible impact on children's and families' health and on parents' work processes. Protocol registered in the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/jd7vk).


Subject(s)
Child Abuse , Parents , Burnout, Psychological , Child , Family Health , Humans
16.
Gut ; 71(2): 238-253, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622066

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori infection is mostly a family-based infectious disease. To facilitate its prevention and management, a national consensus meeting was held to review current evidence and propose strategies for population-wide and family-based H. pylori infection control and management to reduce the related disease burden. METHODS: Fifty-seven experts from 41 major universities and institutions in 20 provinces/regions of mainland China were invited to review evidence and modify statements using Delphi process and grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation system. The consensus level was defined as ≥80% for agreement on the proposed statements. RESULTS: Experts discussed and modified the original 23 statements on family-based H. pylori infection transmission, control and management, and reached consensus on 16 statements. The final report consists of three parts: (1) H. pylori infection and transmission among family members, (2) prevention and management of H. pylori infection in children and elderly people within households, and (3) strategies for prevention and management of H. pylori infection for family members. In addition to the 'test-and-treat' and 'screen-and-treat' strategies, this consensus also introduced a novel third 'family-based H. pylori infection control and management' strategy to prevent its intrafamilial transmission and development of related diseases. CONCLUSION: H. pylori is transmissible from person to person, and among family members. A family-based H. pylori prevention and eradication strategy would be a suitable approach to prevent its intra-familial transmission and related diseases. The notion and practice would be beneficial not only for Chinese residents but also valuable as a reference for other highly infected areas.


Subject(s)
Family Health , Helicobacter Infections/prevention & control , Helicobacter pylori , Infection Control/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Helicobacter Infections/diagnosis , Helicobacter Infections/transmission , Humans , Infant , Middle Aged , Young Adult
17.
Br J Psychiatry ; 220(1): 4-6, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591595

ABSTRACT

Resilience is a dynamic, multi-level, multi-systemic process of positive adaptation at the individual, family and community levels. Promoting resilience can be a cost-effective form of preventive and early intervention, offering significant health advantages for young people throughout their lives. Developing resiliency interventions for youth and their families in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), particularly in the context of the ongoing pandemic, is especially important given a lack of services and trained specialists, and poor levels of public spend on mental health, alongside marked and clustered psychosocial disadvantages and adverse childhood experiences. We propose a 'hybrid' model targeting 10- to 17 year-old children and their families, and options to engage through communities, schools and the family unit. These options will enhance individual and family resilience, and possibly buffer against adversity. The adaptations respect cultural and health beliefs, take account of structural drivers of inequalities and are suitable for LMICs.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Child , Family Health , Humans , Mental Health , Poverty
18.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 41-46, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF centers shifted to a telehealth delivery model. Our study aimed to determine how people with CF (PwCF) and their families experienced telehealth and assessed its quality and acceptability for future CF care. METHODS: The CF Patient and Family State of Care Survey (PFSoC) was fielded from August 31-October 30, 2020. The PFSoC explored themes of overall telehealth quality, ease of use, desirability, and preference for a future mix of in-person and telehealth care. Demographic covariates considered included: gender, age, CFTR modulator status, and region of residence. RESULTS: 424 PwCF and parents of PwCF responded (47% parents). Most (81%) reported a telehealth visit which included a MD/APP and nurse team members. 91% found telehealth easy to use, and 66% reported similar/higher quality than in-person care. One-third (34%) reported the highest desire for future telehealth care, with 45% (n =212) desiring 50% or more of visits conducted via telehealth. Adults were more likely than parents to report highest desire for future telehealth (64% vs. 36%). Respondents who perceived telehealth as similar/higher quality were more likely to desire future telehealth compared to those who perceived telehealth as lower quality (96% vs. 50%). Mixed methods analysis revealed themes affecting perceptions of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF desire for future telehealth was influenced by perception of quality and age. Several themes emerged that need to be explored as telehealth is adapted into the CF chronic care model, especially when thinking about integration into pediatric care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Family Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Models, Organizational , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
19.
Fam Process ; 61(1): 76-90, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583568

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic has been highly stressful for parents and children, it is clear that strategies that promote long-term family resilience are needed to protect families in future crises. One such strategy, the Family Foundations program, is focused on promoting supportive coparenting at the transition to parenthood. In a randomized trial, we tested the long-term intervention effects of Family Foundations on parent, child, and family well-being one to two months after the imposition of a national shelter-in-place public health intervention in 2020. We used regression models to test intervention impact on outcomes reported on by parents in a standard questionnaire format and a series of 8 days of daily reports. We also tested moderation of intervention impact by parent depression and coparenting relationship quality. Relative to control families, intervention families demonstrated significantly lower levels of individual and family problems (general parent hostility, harsh and aggressive parenting, coparenting conflict, sibling relationship conflict, and children's negative mood and behavior problems), and higher levels of positive family relationship quality (positive parenting, couple relationship quality, sibling relations, and family cohesion). For some outcomes, including coparenting conflict, harsh parenting, and child behavior problems, intervention effects were larger for more vulnerable families-that is, families with higher pre-pandemic levels of parent depression or lower levels of coparenting relationship quality. We conclude that targeted family prevention programming is able to promote healthy parent and child functioning during unforeseen future periods of acute stress. The long-term benefits of a universal approach to family support at the transition to parenthood indicate the need for greater investment in the dissemination of effective approaches.


Dado que la pandemia de COVID-19 ha sido muy estresante para padres e hijos, está claro que se necesitan estrategias que promuevan la resiliencia familiar a largo plazo para proteger a las familias en crisis futuras. Una de esas estrategias, el programa Family Foundations, se centra en promover la crianza compartida de apoyo en la transición a la paternidad. En un ensayo aleatorizado, probamos los efectos de la intervención a largo plazo de Family Foundations en el bienestar de los padres, el niño y la familia uno o dos meses después de la imposición de una intervención nacional de salud pública de refugio en el lugar en 2020. Usamos modelos de regresión para evaluar el impacto de la intervención en los resultados informados por los padres en un formato de cuestionario estándar y una serie de 8 días de informes diarios. También probamos la moderación del impacto de la intervención por la depresión de los padres y la calidad de la relación de coparentalidad. En relación con las familias de control, las familias de intervención demostraron niveles significativamente más bajos de problemas individuales y familiares (hostilidad general de los padres, crianza dura y agresiva, conflicto de crianza conjunta, conflicto de relaciones entre hermanos y problemas de comportamiento y estado de ánimo negativos de los niños) y niveles más altos de calidad de relación familiar positiva (crianza positiva, calidad de la relación de pareja, relaciones entre hermanos y cohesión familiar). Para algunos resultados, incluido el conflicto de crianza compartida, la crianza severa y los problemas de comportamiento infantil, los efectos de la intervención fueron mayores para las familias más vulnerables, es decir, familias con niveles más altos de depresión de los padres prepandémicos o niveles más bajos de calidad de la relación de crianza compartida. Concluimos que los programas de prevención familiar específicos pueden promover el funcionamiento saludable de padres e hijos durante períodos futuros imprevistos de estrés agudo. Los beneficios a largo plazo de un enfoque universal del apoyo familiar en la transición a la paternidad indican la necesidad de una mayor inversión en la difusión de enfoques eficaces.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child Behavior , Family Health , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parent-Child Relations , Parenting , Parents
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