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1.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 24(10): 1085-1091, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2155735

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical features and prognosis of children and their family members with family clusters of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant infection under the admission mode of parent-child ward. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on the medical data of 190 children and 190 family members with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection who were admitted to Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital, the designated hospital for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), April 8 to May 10, 2022. RESULTS: Both the child and adult groups were mainly mild COVID-19, and the proportion of mild cases in the child group was higher than that in the adult group (P<0.05). Respiratory symptoms were the main clinical manifestations in both groups. Compared with the adult group, the child group had higher incidence rates of fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and wheezing (P<0.05) and lower incidence rates of nasal obstruction, runny nose, cough, dry throat, throat itching, and throat pain (P<0.05). Compared with the child group, the adult group had higher rates of use of Chinese patent drugs, traditional Chinese medicine decoction, recombinant interferon spray, cough-relieving and phlegm-eliminating drugs, and nirmatrelvir/ritonavir tablets (P<0.05). Compared with the adult group, the child group had a lower vaccination rate of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (30.5% vs 71.1%, P<0.001) and a shorter duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid (P<0.05). The patients with mild COVID-19 had a shorter duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid than those with common COVID-19 in both groups (P<0.05). The patients with underlying diseases had a longer duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid than those without such diseases in both groups (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Both children and adults with family clusters of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection manifest mainly mild COVID-19. Despite lower vaccination rate of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in children, they have rapid disease recovery, with a shorter duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid than adults, under the admission mode of parent-child ward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nucleic Acids , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Cough , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Family
2.
Am J Public Health ; 112(12): 1735-1737, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141108
3.
J Dr Nurs Pract ; 15(3): 144-149, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141073

ABSTRACT

Background: Family health plays a vital role in the self-care and lifestyle modifications in families living with heart failure. Objective: To investigate the family health of patients with heart failure and their family members before and during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Method: This was a cross-sectional study design. We included 34 participants before and 34 participants during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Independent t-tests were conducted for comparison of the mean scores of the family health and its dimensions. Results: There was no significant difference between the total score of family health during the first COVID-19 lockdown compared to before the first COVID-19 lockdown in patients and family members. However, the values and ill-being dimensions of family health in patients and ill-being dimension in family members were significantly decreased during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Conclusion: This study indicated the positive and negative impacts of COVID-19 lockdown on family health. Implications for Nursing: Our results may help nurses to identify vulnerable patients with a low level of family health to tailor the best support to them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health , Communicable Disease Control , Family , Heart Failure/epidemiology
4.
Creat Nurs ; 28(4): 213-220, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141072

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses were placed in an unprecedented context in which they engaged with community members, family members, and friends while positioned between dire hospital situations and community disbelief about the seriousness of the pandemic, often along political lines. A secondary analysis of a qualitative study exploring experiences of 39 nurses in the United States and Brazil in engaging with the community and political discourse during the pandemic provided insights into the impact of these interactions on nurses, and implications for how nurses may emerge from this pandemic time stronger and more supported by those in administrative positions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , United States , Humans , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fear , Family
5.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 796, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139187
7.
Acta Paediatr ; 111(12): 2422, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2136655

Subject(s)
Refugees , Child , Humans , Child Health , Family
8.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(12): 1790-1792, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2128540
9.
Lancet Glob Health ; 10(12): e1774-e1781, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2120307

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is concern that the COVID-19 pandemic has damaged global childhood tuberculosis management. Quantifying changes in childhood tuberculosis notifications could support more targeted interventions to restore childhood tuberculosis services. We aimed to use time-series modelling to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on child tuberculosis notifications. METHODS: Annual tuberculosis case notification data reported to WHO by 215 countries were used to calculate annual notification counts for the years 2014-20, stratified by age groups (0-4, 5-14, and ≥15 years) and sex. We used time-series modelling to predict notification counts for 2020, and calculated differences between these predictions and observed notifications in 2020 for each of the six WHO regions and at the country level for 30 countries with high tuberculosis burden. We assessed associations between these differences and the COVID-19 stringency index, a measure of COVID-19 social impact. FINDINGS: From 2014 to 2019, annual tuberculosis notification counts increased across all age groups and WHO regions. More males than females in the 0-4 years age group and ≥15 years age group had notifications in all years from 2014 to 2020 and in all WHO regions. In the 5-14 years age group, more females than males were notified globally in all years, although some WHO regions had higher notifications from males than females. In 2020, global notifications were 35·4% lower than predicted (95% prediction interval -30·3 to -39·9; 142 525 observed vs 220 794 predicted notifications [95% prediction interval 204 509 to 237 078]) for children aged 0-4 years, 27·7% lower (-23·4 to -31·5; 256 398 vs 354 578 [334 724 to 374 431]) in children aged 5-14 years, and 18·8% lower (-15·4 to -21·9; 5 391 753 vs 6 639 547 [6 375 086 to 6 904 007]) for people aged 15 years or older. Among those aged 5-14 years, the reduction in observed relative to predicted notifications for 2020 was greater in males (-30·9% [-24·8 to -36·1]) than females (-24·5% [-18·1 to -29·9]). Among 28 countries with high tuberculosis burden, no association was observed between the stringency of COVID-19 restrictions and the relative difference in observed versus predicted notifications. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that COVID-19 has substantially affected childhood tuberculosis services, with the youngest children most affected. Although children have mostly had fewer severe health consequences from COVID-19 than have adults, they have been disproportionately affected by the effects of the pandemic on tuberculosis care. Observed sex differences suggest that targeted interventions might be required. As countries rebuild health systems following the COVID-19 pandemic, it is crucial that childhood tuberculosis services are placed centrally within national strategic plans. FUNDING: Medical Research Council.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tuberculosis , Child , Adult , Humans , Female , Male , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Child, Preschool , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Family , Time Factors
11.
Front Public Health ; 10: 981780, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109879

ABSTRACT

Background: In Greece, there is still limited research on death in isolation due to COVID-19. This deserves attention because of the recent financial crisis, which profoundly impacted public health, and the high relevance of the Hippocratic tradition to the moral values of clinical practice. Methods: A prospective qualitative study using in-depth interviews with 15 frontline nursing practitioners working in a COVID-19 ward or intensive care unit (ICU) was conducted from July 2021 to December 2021. Results: The inability of family members to say a final goodbye before, during, or after death by performing proper mourning rituals is extremely inhuman and profoundly impacts the mental health status of patients, family members, and nursing practitioners. Patients and their family members strongly desire to see each other. Epidemiology, liability, and proper nursing performance emerged as reasons for the enforced strict visitation restrictions. Participants emphasized that visitations should be allowed on an individual basis and highlighted the need for the effective use of remote communication technology, which, however, does not substitute for in-person contact. Importantly, physicians allowed "clandestine" visits on an individual basis. Nursing practitioners had a strong empathic attitude toward both patients and their families, and a strong willingness to provide holistic care and pay respect to dead bodies. However, they also experienced moral distress. Witnessing heartbreaking scenes with patients and/or their families causes nursing practitioners to experience intense psychological distress, which affects their family life rather than nursing performance. Ultimately, there was a shift from a patient-centered care model to a population-centered care model. Furthermore, we identified a range of policy- and culture-related factors that exaggerate the negative consequences of dying alone of COVID-19. Conclusion: These results reinforce the existing literature on several fronts. However, we identified some nuances related to political decisions and, most importantly, convictions that are deeply rooted in Greek culture. These findings are of great importance in planning tailored interventions to mitigate the problem of interest and have implications for other similar national contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Qualitative Research , Family/psychology
12.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 30(spe): e3753, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109436

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to understand the biographical ruptures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescent and young trans men and transmasculine people in the Brazilian context. METHOD: qualitative study - multicenter, online survey. A total of 97 self-identified trans men and 22 transmasculine people participated and completed a semi-structured form in two stages. The data was subjected to Reflective Thematic Content Analysis. The interpretation was made on a sociological basis, based on the concept of biographical rupture. RESULTS: five categories were derived: interruption of hormonization, surgeries and specialized follow-up; discomforts caused by the rupture of masculine characteristics, self-image, self-perception, and identity; vulnerability from the losses of family members and significant people, employment, and weakening of support networks; emergence of psycho-emotional problems, such as loss of meaning in life; demands for nursing care and valuing the life of transmasculine adolescents and young men in post-pandemic times. CONCLUSION: the biographical ruptures caused by the pandemic threatened the identities of trans and transmasculine people of adolescents and youth, degraded and interrupted biographies, leading them to the loss of meaning in life. Nursing professionals can be strategic and essential in overcoming threats by intervening early. KEYPOINTS: (1) Shows biographical ruptures in transmasculinities during the pandemic. (2) Elucidates threats to achieving the desired trans identity. (3) Reveals barriers in services that hinder hormone transition. (4) Presents the discourse of suicide and new stressors in mental health. (5) Raises calls for nursing practice/care in adolescent health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Male , Adolescent , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , Family
13.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 36(6): 349-355, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107625

ABSTRACT

Through qualitative inquiry grounded in story theory, this study described the impact of COVID-19 on a 5-member family. Using conventional content analysis, 8 themes were abstracted and organized around the story plot of being exposed, facing the challenge, and moving to resolution. Findings offer an approach for holistic nursing practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Holistic Nursing , Humans , Qualitative Research , Family
14.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2591, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100304

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Understanding the psychological and behavioral reactions to emerging infectious diseases is crucial in managing outbreaks. This study sought to explain family members' experiences of individual memories and coping with the COVID-19 lockdown. Methods: An exploratory, descriptive and qualitative research was conducted by content analysis in Lorestan province, Iran. The purposive sampling was continued by achieving data saturation, reaching 29 samples. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to family members who stayed at home during the COVID-19-induced lockdown. The data was collected from October 2020 to February 2021. Content analysis presented by Graneheim and Lundman was used to analyze the data. Results: The findings of this study contained 100 codes and five categories with its respective subcategories. Categories included taking advantage of opportunities (increasing intimate communication in the family; compensation and progress), coping mechanisms (creating fun and creativity at home; trying to spend leisure time; sports, reading books, music; increasing patience and tolerance; and forced Internet communications), social aspects (positive and negative), outcomes (gratefulness, pleasure, and happiness; concerns; psychological aspects; and damage and challenge to the foundation of families), and economic aspects (cost savings; recession/job loss/financial downturn; and low-income families' unaffordability to prepare electronics for education). Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic and its induced-lockdown have affected various aspects of family life and its pros and cons have been presented by the participants. Policymakers must design and implement programs in line with this change in the public's lifestyles so that families are not damaged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Family/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Qualitative Research
15.
Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi ; 60(11): 1212-1214, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099936

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Family
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082028

ABSTRACT

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are known to contribute to later mental health. Conversely, Benevolent Childhood Experiences (BCEs) may buffer against mental health difficulties. The importance of ACEs and BCEs for mental health of both parents and children may be most obvious during periods of stress, with potential consequences for functioning of the family. Subgroups of ACEs and BCEs in parents during the COVID-19 pandemic were investigated and validated in relation to indices of parent, child, and family well-being. In May 2020, ACEs/BCEs were assessed in 547 parents of 5-18-year-old children from the U.K., U.S., Canada, and Australia. Subgroups of parents with varying levels of ACEs and BCEs were identified via latent class analysis. The subgroups were validated by examining associations between class membership and indices of parent and child mental health and family well-being. Four latent classes were identified: low-ACEs/high-BCEs, moderate-ACEs/high-BCEs, moderate-ACEs/low-BCEs, and high-ACEs/moderate-BCEs. Regardless of the extent of BCEs, there was an increased risk of parent and child mental health difficulties and family dysfunction among those reporting moderate-to-high levels of ACEs. Parents' history of adversity may influence the mental health of their family. These findings highlight the importance of public health interventions for preventing early-life adversity.


Subject(s)
Adverse Childhood Experiences , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Family
18.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 50(3): 12-13, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074981

ABSTRACT

In a field that strives to care for patients and families together, what can palliative care clinicians do when patients' families are physically absent? The Covid-19 pandemic has put both literal and figurative walls between health care professionals and families. How health care workers respond to these disconnections might have a lasting impact on patients, on families, and on our practice. Recently, I saw this in the case of a patient our palliative care team was consulted to see. Mr. B was minimally responsive and dying from multisystem organ failure of unclear etiology. As in other cases during this pandemic, our team became a facilitator of interaction between the patient and the physically absent family, seeing an intimacy we normally would not, in this case, by being present while our intern held the phone to Mr. B's ear for an end-of-life call from his wife, son, and daughter. Such moments force us clinicians to be even more present for our families and patients, and they allow us to bear witness to the strength and sadness and love that we might otherwise miss.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Ethics Consultation , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Nutrients ; 14(19)2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066299

ABSTRACT

Evidence shows that numerous family-related variables influence parents' use of different food parenting practices (FPP), but less is known about the influence of parents' work-related variables on their use of FPP, and their own and their children's outcomes in the food domain. To fill this gap, the present study explored intra-individual and inter-individual effects between work-to-family enrichment (WtoFE), parents' monitoring practices, the adolescent's perception of their parents' monitoring practices, and the three family members' satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL), in different-sex dual-earner parents with adolescent children. The mediating role of monitoring between WtoFE and SWFoL was also tested. A sample of 430 different-sex dual-earner parents and one of their adolescent children (average age 13.0 years, 53.7% female) were recruited in Rancagua, Chile, during March and June 2020. The three family members answered the monitoring dimension of the Compressive Feeding Practices Questionnaire and the Satisfaction with Food-Related Life Scale. Parents answered a measure of WtoFE based on the Work-Home Interaction Survey. Analyses were conducted using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model and structural equation modelling. Results showed a positive association between WtoFE and SWFoL, directly (p < 0.001) and through monitoring in fathers (95% confidence interval [0.010, 0.097], actor effect). The father's (p = 0.042) and mother's (p = 0.006) WtoFE was positively associated with their adolescent's SWFoL (partner effects). The father's (p = 0.002) and mother's (p = 0.036) WtoFE were positively associated with their own monitoring (actor effect), while only the father's WtoFE (p = 0.014) was positively associated with the adolescent's perception of their parents' monitoring (partner effect). The father's (p = 0.018) and mother's (p = 0.003) monitoring, as well as the adolescents' perception of their parents' monitoring (p = 0.033), were positively associated with their own SWFoL (actor effects), while the mother's monitoring (p = 0.043) was also associated with the father's SWFoL (partner effects). Findings suggest that both parents' WtoFE improved their monitoring practices, which, in turn, improved their own SWFoL and their adolescent child's SWFoL. Policymakers and organizations must aim to promote the WtoFE of working parents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Satisfaction , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Family , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parents
20.
BMJ ; 378: e070608, 2022 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064087
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