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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 981780, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109879

ABSTRACT

Background: In Greece, there is still limited research on death in isolation due to COVID-19. This deserves attention because of the recent financial crisis, which profoundly impacted public health, and the high relevance of the Hippocratic tradition to the moral values of clinical practice. Methods: A prospective qualitative study using in-depth interviews with 15 frontline nursing practitioners working in a COVID-19 ward or intensive care unit (ICU) was conducted from July 2021 to December 2021. Results: The inability of family members to say a final goodbye before, during, or after death by performing proper mourning rituals is extremely inhuman and profoundly impacts the mental health status of patients, family members, and nursing practitioners. Patients and their family members strongly desire to see each other. Epidemiology, liability, and proper nursing performance emerged as reasons for the enforced strict visitation restrictions. Participants emphasized that visitations should be allowed on an individual basis and highlighted the need for the effective use of remote communication technology, which, however, does not substitute for in-person contact. Importantly, physicians allowed "clandestine" visits on an individual basis. Nursing practitioners had a strong empathic attitude toward both patients and their families, and a strong willingness to provide holistic care and pay respect to dead bodies. However, they also experienced moral distress. Witnessing heartbreaking scenes with patients and/or their families causes nursing practitioners to experience intense psychological distress, which affects their family life rather than nursing performance. Ultimately, there was a shift from a patient-centered care model to a population-centered care model. Furthermore, we identified a range of policy- and culture-related factors that exaggerate the negative consequences of dying alone of COVID-19. Conclusion: These results reinforce the existing literature on several fronts. However, we identified some nuances related to political decisions and, most importantly, convictions that are deeply rooted in Greek culture. These findings are of great importance in planning tailored interventions to mitigate the problem of interest and have implications for other similar national contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Qualitative Research , Family/psychology
2.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2591, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100304

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Understanding the psychological and behavioral reactions to emerging infectious diseases is crucial in managing outbreaks. This study sought to explain family members' experiences of individual memories and coping with the COVID-19 lockdown. Methods: An exploratory, descriptive and qualitative research was conducted by content analysis in Lorestan province, Iran. The purposive sampling was continued by achieving data saturation, reaching 29 samples. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to family members who stayed at home during the COVID-19-induced lockdown. The data was collected from October 2020 to February 2021. Content analysis presented by Graneheim and Lundman was used to analyze the data. Results: The findings of this study contained 100 codes and five categories with its respective subcategories. Categories included taking advantage of opportunities (increasing intimate communication in the family; compensation and progress), coping mechanisms (creating fun and creativity at home; trying to spend leisure time; sports, reading books, music; increasing patience and tolerance; and forced Internet communications), social aspects (positive and negative), outcomes (gratefulness, pleasure, and happiness; concerns; psychological aspects; and damage and challenge to the foundation of families), and economic aspects (cost savings; recession/job loss/financial downturn; and low-income families' unaffordability to prepare electronics for education). Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic and its induced-lockdown have affected various aspects of family life and its pros and cons have been presented by the participants. Policymakers must design and implement programs in line with this change in the public's lifestyles so that families are not damaged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Family/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Qualitative Research
3.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 50(3): 12-13, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074981

ABSTRACT

In a field that strives to care for patients and families together, what can palliative care clinicians do when patients' families are physically absent? The Covid-19 pandemic has put both literal and figurative walls between health care professionals and families. How health care workers respond to these disconnections might have a lasting impact on patients, on families, and on our practice. Recently, I saw this in the case of a patient our palliative care team was consulted to see. Mr. B was minimally responsive and dying from multisystem organ failure of unclear etiology. As in other cases during this pandemic, our team became a facilitator of interaction between the patient and the physically absent family, seeing an intimacy we normally would not, in this case, by being present while our intern held the phone to Mr. B's ear for an end-of-life call from his wife, son, and daughter. Such moments force us clinicians to be even more present for our families and patients, and they allow us to bear witness to the strength and sadness and love that we might otherwise miss.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Ethics Consultation , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0273721, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054331

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought new challenges to almost every aspect of parents' and their children's lives, posing an acute threat to the families' quality of life (FQOL). This study had two aims: (1) to identify changes in family coping-strategy profiles among parents pre- and during the first COVID-19 lockdown and (2) to analyze interactions between the clusters of coping strategies pre-COVID with FQOL during the first lockdown. A sample of 253 parents (58.5% mothers) of children (3 to 18 yr old) completed the Family Pandemic Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales and the FQOL Scale about their family life pre- and during the COVID-19 lockdown. Four family coping-strategy clusters were found. Differences were found between those clusters pre- and during the first COVID-19 lockdown, with a high percentage of families using the positive appraisal strategy more often. Significant interactions were found between the family coping-strategy clusters pre-COVID-19 and the FQOL factors before and during the pandemic. Most families maintained their FQOL levels during the first lockdown. Close and frequent interactions between family members had relationships with positive emotions and significant effects on well-being. Results showed that positive cognitive appraisal was a protective factor against a significant decrease in FQOL during the first COVID-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Family/psychology , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
5.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0273307, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054320

ABSTRACT

Disasters, from hurricanes to pandemics, tremendously impact human lives and behaviors. Physical closeness to family post-disaster plays a critical role in mental healing and societal sustainability. Nonetheless, little is known about whether and how family colocation alters after a disaster, a topic of immense importance to a post-disaster society. We analyze 1 billion records of population-scale, granular, individual-level mobile location data to quantify family colocation, and examine the magnitude, dynamics, and socioeconomic heterogeneity of the shift in family colocation from the pre- to post-disaster period. Leveraging Hurricane Florence as a natural experiment, and Geographic Information System (GIS), machine learning, and statistical methods to investigate the shift across the landfall (treated) city of Wilmington, three partially treated cites on the hurricane's path, and two control cities off the path, we uncover dramatic (18.9%), widespread (even among the partially treated cities), and enduring (over at least 3 months) escalations in family colocation. These findings reveal the powerful psychological and behavioral impacts of the disaster upon the broader populations, and simultaneously remarkable human resilience via behavioral adaptations during disastrous times. Importantly, the disaster created a gap across socioeconomic groups non-existent beforehand, with the disadvantaged displaying weaker lifts in family colocation. This sheds important lights on policy making and policy communication to promote sustainable family colocation, healthy coping strategies against traumatic experiences, social parity, and societal recovery.


Subject(s)
Cyclonic Storms , Disasters , Family , Adaptation, Psychological , Family/psychology , Geographic Information Systems , Humans , Resilience, Psychological , Socioeconomic Factors , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
6.
J Cross Cult Gerontol ; 37(3): 275-294, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035145

ABSTRACT

South Africa has experienced considerable international outward migration in the last half century, which has had a severe psychological impact on members of families affected by this phenomenon. Older parents who remain behind may experience feelings of loss and isolation. Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) are useful in maintaining relationships between family members separated by migration and increasingly allow migrant families to experience a virtual co-presence despite geographical separation. However, the process may be challenging, especially for older people with hearing difficulties. This article reports on a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of a group of older adults who have difficulty hearing and who live in a residential care home about using ICTs to communicate with family abroad. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. Most of the participants used either a fixed line telephone or a mobile phone. They reported challenges in communicating with family members abroad arising from their deafness, as well as difficulties using technological devices together with their hearing aids. These challenges resulted in feelings of helplessness and frustration. Although the data collection took place prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, these findings may be of particular relevance to situations such as those during the pandemic when many older adults became more reliant on technology to communicate with family members because of restrictions on direct contact. Accordingly, suggestions are made to address challenges in communication between older adults and loved ones who are geographically separated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrants and Immigrants , Humans , Aged , South Africa , Pandemics , Family/psychology , Communication
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997590

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed gaps and areas of need in health systems worldwide. This work aims to map the evidence on COVID-19-related healthcare needs of adult patients, their family members, and the professionals involved in their care during the first year of the pandemic. We searched the databases MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts and assessed full texts for eligibility. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Descriptive data were extracted and inductive qualitative content analysis was used to generate codes and derive overarching themes. Thirty-six studies met inclusion criteria, with the majority reporting needs from the perspective of professionals (35/36). Professionals' needs were grouped into three main clusters (basic, occupational, and psycho-socio-emotional needs); patients' needs into four (basic, healthcare, psycho-socio-emotional, and other support needs); and family members' needs into two (psycho-socio-emotional and communication needs). Transversal needs across subgroups were also identified and grouped into three main clusters (public safety, information and communication, and coordination and support needs). This evidence map provides valuable insight on COVID-19-related healthcare needs. More research is needed to assess first-person perspectives of patients and their families, examine whether needs differ by country or region, and evaluate how needs have evolved over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Family/psychology , Health Facilities , Humans
8.
MEDICC Rev ; 24(3-4): 61-67, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1989053

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused notable changes in all areas of our lives. Pandemic-coping strategies include attention and care at various levels, for different people and in various scenarios. Death is one of the most feared consequences of COVID-19 for both patients and their families; for the latter, the grief and adaptation processes to loss require that care for grievers be an important part of the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Grief from losses due to COVID-19 has distinctive features: it is not anticipatory (with virtually no time or progressive stages to facilitate adaptation to loss); closure or goodbyes are not possible (in-person social support decreases due to distancing to minimize risk of infection); it may affect various close relationships (a relevant predictor of complicated grief); it may imply stigmatization by peers, friends and neighbors; it is preceded by a period of absence of fluid and in-person communication between family members and the hospitalized patient; and those who break the news of the death are often professionals in red zones who are stressed and do not always have the skills or the ability to properly communicate bad news. The death of a family member from COVID-19 generally causes an unexpected crisis in the family, which is already affected by the pandemic and its daily consequences. This has prompted an analysis of COVID-19 loss on family life and how best to mitigate its consequences. During the COVID-19 pandemic, care and monitoring of the grief of family members and those who were close to the deceased require psychological action within a framework of comprehensive care, which demands preparation of healthcare professionals. Experiences described are taken from some actions developed in Cuba.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Cuba , Grief , Family/psychology
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969216

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes the influence of the corporate image of nursing homes on the decisions made by family members as to whether their elderly relatives will stay in the same nursing home. An empirical study was conducted considering 566 residents' family members with the capacity to decide whether said residents will remain in the same nursing home, using a binary regression model with a logistic link function (i.e., logit). For the first time in the nursing home sector, these results show the specific variables of the corporate image that influence family members when deciding whether their elders will stay in the same nursing home. In order of importance, these variables are the level of trust conveyed by the nursing home, the investment made in the facilities, price-quality ratio, emotional connection to the nursing home, and the promotion of the nursing home's services. The study also highlights the importance of other personal factors in family members' decisions to keep their elders in the same nursing home, such as the family members' employment situations (higher loyalty among those employed by third parties) and the determining factors involved in the relative's choice of nursing home (higher loyalty among those whose choice was mainly based on humane and dignified treatment). This study offers a discussion of the theoretical contributions this research brings to academia as well as managerial implications for the industry. We believe that one future line of research should be continued after the COVID-19 pandemic comes to an end to compare the results and observe whether the most influential variables on family members' loyalty remain the same as data for this study was collected from November 2019 to February 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Humans , Nursing Homes , Qualitative Research
11.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(6): e0010476, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957097

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Leprosy reactions, Type-1 and erythema nodosum leprosum, are immune-mediated complications of leprosy, which play a significant role in the morbidity associated with the disease. A considerable amount of literature has been published on the impact of leprosy in general but few studies focus specifically on leprosy reactions. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leprosy reactions on physical, psychological, and social aspects of the lives of people affected by analysing their life experiences and perspectives about leprosy reactions. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This qualitative study involved people affected by leprosy reactions and their family members in two leprosy endemic countries. The data were collected through 66 interviews and 9 focus group discussions (4-6 participants each) in Surabaya, Indonesia, and Purulia, India. Content analysis and conversational analysis were performed. This study found that both types of leprosy reactions were perceived as an unpredictable and painful condition. Leprosy reactions restricted physical activities of the participants, such as going to bathroom, sleeping, eating, and cooking. In the interviews, the respondents expressed a range of emotions and feelings including confusion, sadness, anxiety, and anger. Some recounted that they felt stigmatized and lost opportunities to socialise and earn money. Differences between the two settings were identified. The majority of Indonesian participants preferred to stay at home, and some concealed the diagnosis of leprosy, while most of the Indian respondents continued working up to the time of hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Leprosy reactions are a distressing complication of leprosy and adversely affect the lives of those affected. Individuals reported physical discomfort, distress, anxiety, stigma, and financial hardship and these negative impacts in the physical, psychological, and social spheres reinforced each other. These findings provide important information about a need for early detection and sustained commitment to follow-up care for people with a history of leprosy reactions. More research on new drugs for reactional episodes, tools to measure knowledge, attitude, and practice, and costing study on leprosy reactions treatment are needed. We recommend the development and testing of holistic strategies to improve the management of leprosy reactions.


Subject(s)
Erythema Nodosum , Leprosy , Erythema Nodosum/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Humans , Leprosy/epidemiology , Qualitative Research , Social Stigma
12.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(5): 103525, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1944084

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate perspectives of patients, family members, caregivers (PFC), and healthcare professionals (HCP) on tracheostomy care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The cross-sectional survey investigating barriers and facilitators to tracheostomy care was collaboratively developed by patients, family members, nurses, speech-language pathologists, respiratory care practitioners, physicians, and surgeons. The survey was distributed to the Global Tracheostomy Collaborative's learning community, and responses were analyzed. RESULTS: Survey respondents (n = 191) from 17 countries included individuals with a tracheostomy (85 [45 %]), families/caregivers (43 [22 %]), and diverse HCP (63 [33.0 %]). Overall, 94 % of respondents reported concern that patients with tracheostomy were at increased risk of critical illness from SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19; 93 % reported fear or anxiety. With respect to prioritization of care, 38 % of PFC versus 16 % of HCP reported concern that patients with tracheostomies might not be valued or prioritized (p = 0.002). Respondents also differed in fear of contracting COVID-19 (69 % PFC vs. 49 % HCP group, p = 0.009); concern for hospitalization (55.5 % PFC vs. 27 % HCP, p < 0.001); access to medical personnel (34 % PFC vs. 14 % HCP, p = 0.005); and concern about canceled appointments (62 % PFC vs. 41 % HCP, p = 0.01). Respondents from both groups reported severe stress and fatigue, sleep deprivation, lack of breaks, and lack of support (70 % PFC vs. 65 % HCP, p = 0.54). Virtual telecare seldom met perceived needs. CONCLUSION: PFC with a tracheostomy perceived most risks more acutely than HCP in this global sample. Broad stakeholder engagement is necessary to achieve creative, patient-driven solutions to maintain connection, communication, and access for patients with a tracheostomy.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Communication , Family , Patients , Postoperative Care/methods , Tracheostomy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family/psychology , Fatigue , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Patients/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Postoperative Care/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Deprivation , Speech Therapy/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Surgeons/psychology
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938798

ABSTRACT

Family caregiving is a public health issue because of caregivers' significant contribution to the health and social care systems, as well as the substantial impact that giving and receiving care has on the health and quality of life of care receivers and caregivers. While there have been many studies that associate caregivers' care work, financial difficulty, navigation, and other caregiving factors with family caregivers' psychological distress, we were interested not only in the factors related to family caregiver anxiety but also in hypothesizing how those effects occur. In this study, we used Andrew Hayes' PROCESS moderation analysis to explore the link between caregiver frailty, weekly care hours, and perceptions of financial difficulty, social support, and anxiety. In this analysis, we included 474 caregivers with relatively complete data on all of the variables. In regression analysis after controlling for gender and age, social loneliness (ß = 0.245), frailty (ß = 0.199), financial difficulty (ß = 0.196), care time (ß = 0.143), and navigation confidence (ß = 0.131) were all significant. We then used PROCESS Model 6 to determine the significance of the direct, indirect, and total effects through the serial mediation model. The model pathway from frailty to care time to financial difficulty to social loneliness to anxiety was significant. The proportions of family caregivers who were moderately frail, anxious, and experiencing social loneliness after eighteen months of the COVID-19 pandemic found in this survey should be of concern to policymakers and healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Family/psychology , Humans , Mediation Analysis , Pandemics , Quality of Life
16.
J Fam Nurs ; 28(3): 231-242, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916829

ABSTRACT

Caregivers of persons with dementia (PWDs) were socially isolated with little support during the COVID-19 pandemic "Stay-At-Home" order in the United States. To enhance social and emotional connection for diverse caregivers, a culturally/linguistically appropriate telephone intervention provided compassionate listening, mindful breathing, and COVID-19 safety education. The study purpose was to understand caregiving challenges and to evaluate the intervention for caregivers during the early pandemic using a qualitative approach. Twenty-three caregivers participated in the intervention provided by bilingual research assistants for 3 months. Call logs were used to describe the caregivers' dialogue. Thematic analysis identified (a) the challenges, including fear of coronavirus disease, providing around-the-clock care, and forced isolation and negative emotions; and (b) caregivers' experience with the intervention, including connecting with the outside, relief from emotional stress, reliable COVID-19 information, and reinformed caregiving skills. Results suggest that the telephone support was of benefit to diverse caregivers of PWDs during the pandemic by promoting social connection and reducing emotional distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers/psychology , Family/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Telephone
17.
BMC Prim Care ; 23(1): 105, 2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus brought Intensive Care Units (ICUs) back to their past when they were closed to family members. The difficulties of family caregivers encountered after the ICU discharge might have been increased during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, no traces of their experience have been documented to date. The objective of this study is to explore the everyday life experience of relatives in the first three months after a non-COVID-19 ICU discharge. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted in 2020-2021. Two Italian general non-COVID-19 ICUs were approached. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted three months after the ICU discharge. The study has been conducted according to the COnsolidated criteria for REporting Qualitative research principles. RESULTS: A total of 14 family members were interviewed. Participants were mostly females (n = 11; 78.6%), with an average age of 53.9 years. After three months of care of their beloved at home, relatives' experience is summarised in three themes: "Being shaken following the ICU discharge", as experiencing negative and positive feelings; "Returning to our life that is no longer the same", as realising that nothing can be as before; and "Feeling powerless due to the COVID-19 pandemic", given the missed care from community services and the restrictions imposed. CONCLUSIONS: Relatives seem to have experienced a bilateral restriction of opportunities - at the hospital without any engagement in care activities and their limited possibility to visit the ICU, and at home in terms of formal and informal care.


Subject(s)
Family , Intensive Care Units , Patient Discharge , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/psychology , Family/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
18.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 72: 103264, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851181

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To gain perspectives from family members about barriers and facilitators to virtual visit set up and conduct across intensive care unit settings in the United Kingdom to inform understanding of best practices. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study recruiting a purposive sample of family members of adult intensive care unit patients experiencing virtual visiting during Jan to May 2021 of the COVID-19 pandemic. We used semi-structured qualitative interviews and a standard Thematic Analysis approach. RESULTS: We recruited 41 family-member participants from 16 hospitals in the United Kingdom. Facilitators to successful virtual visit set-up were preparation of the family, negotiating a preferred time, and easy-to-use technology. Facilitators to successful conduct were intensive care unit team member presence; enabling family involvement in care; inclusivity, accessibility, and flexibility; and having a sense of control. Barriers that created distress or conflict included restrictive virtual visiting practices; raising expectations then failing to meet them; lack of virtual visit pre-planning; and failing to prepare the patient. Barriers to visit conduct were incorrect camera positioning, insufficient technical and staff resources, issues with three-way connectivity, and lack of call closure. Recommendations included emotional self-preparation, increased technology availability, and preparing conversation topics. CONCLUSION: These data may guide virtual visiting practices during the ongoing pandemic but also to continue virtual visiting outside of pandemic conditions. This will benefit family members suffering from ill health, living at a distance, unable to afford travel, and those with work and care commitments, thereby reducing inequities of access and promoting family-centered care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Critical Care/psychology , Family/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
19.
Sante Publique ; Vol. 33(6): 875-883, 2022 Mar 11.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841528

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The study examines the experience of people living with mental disorders and their family during the spring 2020 confinement in France, as well as the care they received during this period. It also focuses on the experiences of caregivers and how they reorganized themselves during this same period. METHOD: Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, three surveys were conducted during the confinement. Data was collected through two online questionnaires and semi-direct individual interviews with service users, families, and caregivers. RESULTS: The responses to our questionnaires from 173 family members, 68 service users and 40 caregivers show that people suffering from mental disorders adapted well to the confinement. Compared to the general population, there was no instance of psychiatric over-morbidity. However, the families suffered more from psychological difficulties. The deployment of remote consultations, responsiveness and availability of professionals were helpful for users. On the other hand, rapid adaptation that caregivers had to undergo made them experience a sense of loss of the actual meaning of their work. Families suffered from the lack of availability of caregivers. CONCLUSION: The mental health of people suffering from mental disorders involved in this study was not impacted by the confinement. They made use of the various protective resources. The habit of having a solitary life and the knowledge of available resources may have played a favorable role. Peer support has been particularly supportive. Further studies are needed to evaluate the hypothesis of a "second psychiatric wave" due to the global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Caregivers/psychology , Family/psychology , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health
20.
Heart Lung ; 54: 49-55, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1828556

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 patient experiences in the intensive care unit (ICU) are marked by family separation. Families understand the importance of isolation and hospital visiting policies, but they consider it necessary to visit their loved ones and use personal protective equipment. OBJECTIVE: To describe the lived experiences of family members in their first contact with a relative in a COVID-ICU. METHODS: A phenomenological study was conducted using Cohen's method. The subjects were interviewed using an open-question format to allow them full freedom of expression. Twelve family members were recruited between February and March 2021. RESULTS: Analysis of the qualitative data resulted in five major themes: (1) fear of contagion related to donning/doffing procedures, (2) positive emotions related to first contact with the hospitalized relative, (3) concern for the emotional state of the hospitalized relative, (4) impact of the COVID-ICU and comparisons between imagination and reality regarding the severity of the disease, and (5) recognition of and gratitude toward healthcare professionals. CONCLUSIONS: It has been confirmed that visits to the ICU reduce anxiety among family members. Our findings constitute an internationally relevant contribution to understanding of the needs of relatives who meet loved ones for the first time while wearing personal protective equipment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Professional-Family Relations , Qualitative Research
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