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3.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 121(10. Vyp. 2): 92-98, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555871

ABSTRACT

The more we learn about the new coronavirus infection, the more we understand that we will feel the echoes of the pandemic for many years, and those who have successfully endured the acute phase of COVID-19 may face the consequences of the infection. One of the most frequent manifestations will be the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) after COVID-19. This article discusses the possible causes of the development of CFS, as well as possible ways of its treatment and prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(12): e14886, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429759

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate post-COVID-19 symptoms amongst elderly females and whether they could be a risk factor for developing chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) later on. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study, in the form of an online survey. A total of 115 responses were finally included. RESULTS: The mean age was 73.18 ± 6.42. Eighty-nine reported symptoms in the post-recovery period; of these 54 had no symptoms of CFS, 60 were possible, and only 1 was probable. Fatigue was reported by 66, musculoskeletal symptoms by 56, and sleep problems by 73. Twenty-nine patients visited a doctor's office as a result. Post-recovery symptoms were significantly related to stress, sadness and sleep disturbances. Also, stress, sadness, sleep disturbances, fatigue, cognitive impairment, and recurrent falls were all significantly associated with CFS-like symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: From our findings, the presence of fatigue, cognitive impairment, stress, sadness, sleep disturbances and recurrent falls in the post-recovery period were all significantly associated with CFS-like symptoms. To conclude it would be reasonable to screen for long COVID and consider the potential for developing CFS later on. Whether it can be a risk factor for developing CFS-like other viral infections will need more larger scale studies to confirm this.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Female , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Survivors
5.
Semergen ; 48(1): 63-69, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415782

ABSTRACT

Clinical sequelae of a disease as widespread as COVID-19 can be of great importance for primary care due to their prevalence and the morbidity they entail. The definition of long COVID and the establishment of its temporality are various, but some authors consider possible that this syndrome is actually myalgic encephalomyelitis. Similarities are observed when comparing the International Consensus Criteria for the diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis with the symptoms described for long COVID. Blood tests, pulse oximetry, chest radiography, and thoracic ultrasound are recommended in patients with persistent symptoms after acute infection. Management in both conditions consists of treating the main symptoms. The possibility that COVID-19 can lead to a chronic condition such as myalgic encephalomyelitis makes long-term follow-up of patients who have suffered from this infection essential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , COVID-19/complications , Consensus , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/diagnosis , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Neurovirol ; 27(4): 631-637, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338291

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 survivors may report persistent symptoms that resemble myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We explored (a) ME/CFS-like symptom prevalence and (b) whether axonal, inflammatory, and/or lung changes may contribute to ME/CFS-like symptoms in SARS-CoV-2 survivors through clinical, neuropsychiatric, neuropsychological, lung function assessment, and serum neurofilament light chain, an axonal damage biomarker. ME/CFS-like features were found in 27% of our sample. ME/CFS-like group showed worse sleep quality, fatigue, pain, depressive symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, Borg baseline dyspnea of the 6-min walking test vs. those without ME/CFS-like symptoms. These preliminary findings raise concern on a possible future ME/CFS-like pandemic in SARS-CoV-2 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(12): 4422-4425, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296354

ABSTRACT

The huge concern raised by SARS-CoV2 pandemic about public health management and social impact is still under debate, particularly because COVID-19 may affect infected people much longer than expected from a typical air-borne viral disease. The scientific community is actually wondering about the etiopathogenesis and clinical development of this "post-COVID" complex symptomatology, very close to symptoms typically observed in chronic fatigue syndrome, so recently named as "post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC)". This commentary tries to focus on the most recent news about this issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Syndrome
8.
Health Soc Care Community ; 30(1): 1-10, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171133

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has focused health systems on supporting patients affected by this virus. Meanwhile in the community, many other contained patients could only use self-care strategies, especially in countries that have set up a long and strict containment such as France. The study aimed to compare coping strategies deployed by patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS; a poorly recognised syndrome) to those with better known and referenced chronic conditions. An online flash survey was conducted during the containment period in partnership with French Patients Organizations including ME/CFS national association. Therefore, 'Brief COPE' version of Lazarus and Folkman's Ways of Coping Check List has been adapted to the specificity of the containment. The survey was e-distributed in France from 15 April to 11 May 2020. Differences of coping strategies were analyzed using Wilcoxon-Mann-Withney test. Amongst 637 responses, 192 were complete, presenting a wide variety of diseases, including 93 ME/CFS. The latter have significantly different coping strategies than recognised diagnosed diseases patients: similar uses of emotion focused coping but less uses of seek social support and problem-focused copings. In conclusion, coping strategies are different for those who deal with the daily experience of ME/CFS, highly disabling chronic condition with diagnostic ambiguity, low degree of medical and social recognition and without treatment. Better understanding of those strategies is needed to provide the means for health promotion researchers, managers and clinicians, to accompany those patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Adaptation, Psychological , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Pharmacol Res ; 165: 105465, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060052

ABSTRACT

Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by severe and disabling fatigue that fails to improve with rest; it is commonly accompanied by multifocal pain, as well as sleep disruption, and cognitive dysfunction. Even mild exertion can exacerbate symptoms. The prevalence of ME/CFS in the U.S. is estimated to be 0.5-1.5 % and is higher among females. Viral infection is an established trigger for the onset of ME/CFS symptoms, raising the possibility of an increase in ME/CFS prevalence resulting from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Current treatments are largely palliative and limited to alleviating symptoms and addressing the psychological sequelae associated with long-term disability. While ME/CFS is characterized by broad heterogeneity, common features include immune dysregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanistic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Herein, we review the current understanding, diagnosis and treatment of ME/CFS and summarize past clinical studies aimed at identifying effective therapies. We describe the current status of mechanistic studies, including the identification of multiple targets for potential pharmacological intervention, and ongoing efforts towards the discovery of new medicines for ME/CFS treatment.


Subject(s)
Drug Discovery , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/diagnosis , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/drug therapy , Analgesics/pharmacology , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Drug Discovery/methods , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use
10.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 37(4): 295-300, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-267444

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic is not just a medical and social tragedy, but within the threat of the outbreak looms the potential for a significant and persistent negative mental health impact, based on previous experience with other pandemics such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003 and the earlier H1N1 outbreak of 1918. This piece will highlight the links between depression and viral illnesses and explore important overlaps with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, potentially implicating inflammatory mechanisms in those exposed to a range of viral agents. While containment of psychological distress currently focuses on social anxiety and quarantine measures, a second wave of psychological morbidity due to viral illness may be imminent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Humans , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/virology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/virology
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