Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(18): 5871-5875, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451046

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV2 infection (PASC) are a novel terminology used to describe post-COVID persistent symptoms, mimicking somehow the previously described chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). In this manuscript, we evaluated a therapeutical approach to address PASC-derived fatigue in a cohort of past-COVID-19 positive patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A number of 100 patients, previously diagnosed as COVID-19 positive subjects and meeting our eligibility criteria, was diagnosed having PASC-related fatigue. They were recruited in the study and treated with oxygen-ozone autohemotherapy (O2-O3-AHT), according to the SIOOT protocol. Patients' response to O2-O3-AHT and changes in fatigue were measured with the 7-scoring Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), according to previously published protocols. RESULTS: Statistics assessed that the effects of O2-O3-AHT on fatigue reduced PASC symptoms by 67%, as a mean, in all the investigated cohort of patients (H = 148.4786 p < 0.0001) (Figure 1). Patients following O2-O3-AHT therapy, quite completely recovered for PASC-associated fatigue, a quote amounting to about two fifths (around 40%) of the whole cohort undergoing ozone treatment and despite most of patients were female subjects, the effect was not influenced by sex distribution (H = 0.7353, p = 0.39117). CONCLUSIONS: Ozone therapy is able to recover normal functionality and to relief pain and discomfort in the form of PASC-associated fatigue in at least 67% of patients suffering from post-COVID sequelae, aside from sex and age distribution.


Subject(s)
Blood Transfusion/methods , COVID-19/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/therapy , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Ozone/administration & dosage , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Trends Mol Med ; 27(9): 895-906, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366638

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can cause chronic and acute disease. Postacute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) include injury to the lungs, heart, kidneys, and brain that may produce a variety of symptoms. PASC also includes a post-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) syndrome ('long COVID') with features that can follow other acute infectious diseases and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Here we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of ME/CFS and of 'acute' COVID-19, and we speculate that the pathogenesis of post-COVID-19 syndrome in some people may be similar to that of ME/CFS. We propose molecular mechanisms that might explain the fatigue and related symptoms in both illnesses, and we suggest a research agenda for both ME/CFS and post-COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Energy Metabolism , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Nervous System/physiopathology
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(12): 4422-4425, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296354

ABSTRACT

The huge concern raised by SARS-CoV2 pandemic about public health management and social impact is still under debate, particularly because COVID-19 may affect infected people much longer than expected from a typical air-borne viral disease. The scientific community is actually wondering about the etiopathogenesis and clinical development of this "post-COVID" complex symptomatology, very close to symptoms typically observed in chronic fatigue syndrome, so recently named as "post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC)". This commentary tries to focus on the most recent news about this issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Syndrome
5.
Rev Neurol ; 72(11): 384-396, 2021 06 01.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248581

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Many patients with mild or severe COVID-19 do not make a full recovery and have a wide range of chronic symptoms for weeks or months after infection, often of a neurological, cognitive or psychiatric nature. The epidemiological evidence, diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis of post-COVID-19 syndrome are reviewed. DEVELOPMENT: Post-COVID-19 syndrome is defined by persistent clinical signs and symptoms that appear while or after suffering COVID-19, persist for more than 12 weeks and cannot be explained by an alternative diagnosis. The symptoms can fluctuate or cause relapses. It is a heterogeneous condition that includes post-viral chronic fatigue syndrome, sequelae in multiple organs and the effects of severe hospitalisation/post-intensive care syndrome. It has been reported in patients with mild or severe COVID-19 and irrespective of the severity of the symptoms in the acute phase. Between 10% and 65% of survivors who had mild/moderate COVID-19 present symptoms of post-COVID-19 syndrome for 12 weeks or more. At six months, subjects report an average of 14 persistent symptoms. The most common symptoms are fatigue, dyspnoea, anxiety, depression, and impaired attention, concentration, memory and sleep. The underlying biological mechanisms are unknown, although an abnormal or excessive autoimmune and inflammatory response may play an important role. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical manifestations are diverse, fluctuating and variable, although fatigue and neurocognitive complaints predominate. There is no defined consensus on post-COVID-19 syndrome and its diagnostic criteria have not been subjected to adequate psychometric evaluation.


Síndrome post-COVID-19: epidemiología, criterios diagnósticos y mecanismos patogénicos implicados.Introducción. Numerosos pacientes con COVID-19 leve o grave no tienen una recuperación completa y presentan una gran variedad de síntomas crónicos durante semanas o meses tras la infección, con frecuencia de carácter neurológico, cognitivo o psiquiátrico. Se revisan las evidencias epidemiológicas, los criterios diagnósticos y la patogenia del síndrome post-COVID-19. Desarrollo. El síndrome post-COVID-19 se define por la persistencia de signos y síntomas clínicos que surgen durante o después de padecer la COVID-19, permanecen más de 12 semanas y no se explican por un diagnóstico alternativo. Los síntomas pueden fluctuar o causar brotes. Es una entidad heterogénea que incluye el síndrome de fatiga crónica posvírica, la secuela de múltiples órganos y los efectos de la hospitalización grave/síndrome poscuidados intensivos. Se ha descrito en pacientes con COVID-19 leve o grave y con independencia de la gravedad de los síntomas en la fase aguda. Un 10-65% de los supervivientes que padeció COVID-19 leve/moderada presenta síntomas de síndrome post-COVID-19 durante 12 semanas o más. A los seis meses, los sujetos relatan un promedio de 14 síntomas persistentes. Los síntomas más frecuentes son fatiga, disnea, alteración de la atención, de la concentración, de la memoria y del sueño, ansiedad y depresión. Se desconocen los mecanismos biológicos que subyacen, aunque una respuesta autoinmunitaria e inflamatoria anómala o excesiva puede tener un papel importante. Conclusiones. Las manifestaciones clínicas son diversas, fluctuantes y variables, aunque predominan la fatiga y las quejas neurocognitivas. No existe un consenso definido sobre el síndrome post-COVID-19 y sus criterios diagnósticos no se han sometido a una evaluación psicométrica adecuada.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Autoimmunity , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cognition Disorders/etiology , Cognition Disorders/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Hospitalization , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation , Mental Disorders/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Organ Specificity , Pandemics , Primary Dysautonomias/etiology , Risk Factors , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications
6.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 32(2): 188-194, 2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215521

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 continues to spread, with the United States surpassing 29 million cases, health care workers are beginning to see patients who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 return seeking treatment for its longer-term physical and mental effects. The term long-haulers is used to identify patients who have not fully recovered from the illness after weeks or months. Although the acute symptoms of COVID-19 have been widely described, the longer-term effects are less well known because of the relatively short history of the pandemic. Symptoms may be due to persistent chronic inflammation (eg, fatigue), sequelae of organ damage (eg, pulmonary fibrosis, chronic kidney disease), and hospitalization and social isolation (eg, muscle wasting, malnutrition). Health care providers are instrumental in developing a comprehensive plan for identifying and managing post-COVID-19 complications. This article addresses the possible etiology of postviral syndromes and describes reported symptoms and suggested management of post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/nursing , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/physiopathology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Subacute Care/standards , Survivors/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Continuing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
7.
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther ; 51(5): 197-200, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209238

ABSTRACT

SYNOPSIS: The term long COVID was coined by patients to describe the long-term consequences of COVID-19. One year into the pandemic, it was clear that all patients-those hospitalized with COVID-19 and those who lived with the disease in the community-were at risk of developing debilitating sequelae that would impact their quality of life. Patients with long COVID asked for rehabilitation. Many of them, including previously healthy and fit clinicians, tried to fight postviral fatigue with exercise-based rehabilitation. We observed a growing number of patients with long COVID who experienced adverse effects from exercise therapy and symptoms strikingly similar to those of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Community-based physical therapists, including those in private practice, unaware of safety issues, are preparing to help an influx of patients with long COVID. In this editorial, we expose growing concerns about long COVID and ME. We issue safety recommendations for rehabilitation and share resources to improve care for those with postviral illnesses. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2021;51(5):197-200. doi:10.2519/jospt.2021.0106.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/therapy , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/therapy , Exercise Therapy/adverse effects , Humans , Quality of Life , Rest
8.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110469, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002910

ABSTRACT

There has been concern about possible long-term sequelae resembling myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome in COVID-19 patients. Clarifying the mechanisms underlying such a "post-COVID-19 fatigue syndrome" is essential for the development of preventive and early treatment methods for this syndrome. In the present paper, by integrating insights pertaining to the glymphatic system and the nasal cerebrospinal fluid outflow pathway with findings in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and COVID-19, I provide a coherent conceptual framework for understanding the pathophysiology of post-COVID-19 fatigue syndrome. According to this hypothesis, this syndrome may result from damage to olfactory sensory neurons, causing reduced outflow of cerebrospinal fluid through the cribriform plate, and further leading to congestion of the glymphatic system with subsequent toxic build-up within the central nervous system. I further postulate that patients with post-COVID-19 fatigue syndrome may benefit from cerebrospinal fluid drainage by restoring glymphatic transport and waste removal from the brain. Obviously, further research is required to provide further evidence for the presence of this post-viral syndrome, and to provide additional insight regarding the relative contribution of the glymphatic-lymphatic system to it. Other mechanisms may also be involved. If confirmed, the glymphatic-lymphatic system could represent a target in combating post-COVID-19 fatigue syndrome. Moreover, further research in this area could also provide new insights into the understanding of chronic fatigue syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/etiology , Brain/physiopathology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/etiology , Central Nervous System/physiopathology , Ethmoid Bone/physiopathology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/cerebrospinal fluid , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/physiopathology , Glymphatic System/physiopathology , Humans , Models, Neurological , Olfactory Receptor Neurons/physiology , Pandemics , Pseudotumor Cerebri/cerebrospinal fluid , Pseudotumor Cerebri/etiology , Pseudotumor Cerebri/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Time Factors
9.
JAMA ; 324(14): 1381-1383, 2020 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-784154
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...