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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 850533, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776068

ABSTRACT

Background: Although fatigue has been shown to be strongly associated with falls risk, very few studies have focused on its mechanism involved in community-dwelling older subjects. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fatigue and falls risk and its internal mechanism by constructing a chain mediation model. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was adopted. A convenience sample of 270 older adults was recruited from July to October 2021 in an urban community, in Beijing, China. The participants completed the 14-item Fatigue Scale (FS-14), Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and Fall-Risk Self-Assessment Questionnaire (FRQ) to measure fatigue, falls efficacy, lower limb function and falls risk. The theory of unpleasant symptoms was used as a conceptual framework. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized to test the hypothetical model. Results: The overall fit of final model was found to be satisfactory: χ2/df = 1.61, CFI = 0.971, TLI = 0.962, RMSEA = 0.049 (95% CI 0.030/0.066) and SRMR = 0.023. Fatigue had a direct effect on falls risk (ß = 0.559, S.E. = 0.089, 95% CI 0.380/0.731), and it also had indirect effects on falls risk (ß = 0.303, S.E. = 0.072, 95% CI 0.173/0.460) through mediating factors. Falls efficacy and lower limb function were the main mediating variables, and there was a chain mediating effect (ß = 0.015, S.E. = 0.010, 95% CI 0.003/0.046). Conclusions: Our study suggests that fatigue can influence falls risk among the elderly in China. There are many mediating paths between fatigue and falls risk. These results may help healthcare professionals to better understand the inherent relationship between fatigue and fall risk that may benefit older adults.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls , Fatigue , Aged , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Lower Extremity , Postural Balance
2.
Aerosp Med Hum Perform ; 93(1): 50-53, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775639

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Airline cabin crew experience high levels of fatigue and sleepiness. Whether these are solely related to their work schedules/jetlag or are in part related to individual factors is unknown. The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly disrupted the aviation industry and many cabin crew have been grounded. This provides a unique opportunity to assess the causes of fatigue and sleepiness in this population.METHODS: An online anonymous survey was distributed in April-June 2020 to cabin crew who were 1) flying, 2) grounded but doing alternative work, and 3) grounded, not working, or unemployed. The survey measured fatigue, sleepiness, and mental health. It also screened their risk for insomnia, depression, and shift work disorder and assessed drug and caffeine use.RESULTS: Collected were 409 valid responses: 45 currently flying; 35 grounded but doing alternate work; and 329 not working. On average, all three groups experienced normal levels of fatigue and sleepiness. The risk for major depressive disorder was 27.4%, with 59.5% of individuals reporting abnormal levels of anxiety. Caffeine intake and the use of drugs and alcohol to facilitate sleep were common, although not different between those currently flying vs. grounded.CONCLUSIONS: With reduced workloads or not flying, cabin crew reported lowered fatigue and sleepiness compared to prepandemic findings, along with reduced risk for major depressive disorder. However, a high occurrence of negative emotional states were reported, potentially related to the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic. This study suggests fatigue and sleepiness is primarily related to airline operational rather than personal variables.Wen CC-Y, Nicholas CL, Howard ME, Trinder J, Jordan AS. Understanding sleepiness and fatigue in cabin crew using COVID-19 to dissociate causative factors. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2022; 93(1):50-53.


Subject(s)
Aerospace Medicine , COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleepiness
4.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(5): 783-790, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767481

ABSTRACT

As a result of the pandemic, many patients with an inflammatory rheumatic disease (IRD) have isolated themselves. The lack of disease management together with fear of infection could lead to changes in physical- and mental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the social- and health behaviour in patients with an IRD compared with the behaviour of healthy individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was a questionnaire survey answered by patients with an IRD and healthy individuals (HI). The questionnaire contained seven sections with questions regarding COVID-19 and quality of life including SF-36, EQ-5D-5L, and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain, fatigue and global health. Of 1663 invited participants, 661 patients with IRD and 266 HI were included in the analyses. Patients with an IRD felt more isolated during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with HI (IRD: 9.5% (61/644), HI: 3.1% (8/259), p-value = 0.001). More HI (5.4%) had been infected with COVID-19 than patients with an IRD (1.7%). Among patients with an IRD those with worse self-reported disease activity outcomes (VAS pain, fatigue and global health, all p-value < 0.001), worse social functioning and emotional well-being were more isolated than individuals with low disease activity. Patients with an IRD feel more isolated during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to HI. Isolation seems to be most pronounced in patients with worse disease related patient-reported outcomes and lower quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatic Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pain , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology , Rheumatic Diseases/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 65(4): 471-480, 2022 Apr.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Employees from medical and nursing professions are at increased risk for a SARS-CoV­2 infection and thus more frequently affected by COVID-19 sequelae. Previous studies have identified post-viral fatigue as the most common sequelae. The aim of this study was to investigate risk factors and effects induced by clinically relevant fatigue symptoms following a COVID-19 infection of healthcare workers. METHODS: In the spring of 2021, 4315 insured members of the Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Service were contacted for a written survey on their COVID-19 disease in 2020 and its sequelae. Information on Symptoms of acute infection, disease sequelae, and potential risk factors were collected, as well as the physical and mental health status after SARS-CoV­2 infection. The general fatigue scale of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) was used as fatigue screening. Regression analyses and multivariate analyses of variance were calculated for data analysis. RESULTS: Of the respondents, 10.7% showed severe fatigue symptoms. Identified risk factors for clinical fatigue symptoms included preexisting mental and respiratory conditions and severity of acute infection. Furthermore, severe long-/post-COVID fatigue was associated with higher psychological distress, lower health-related quality of life, and more frequent incapacity to work. CONCLUSIONS: Severe long-/post-COVID fatigue is associated with a high level of distress, which requires specific rehabilitation approaches and poses a challenge to the social insurance agencies and accident insurers to develop appropriate rehabilitation concepts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Germany/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 196-205, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has profound negative effects on the mental health of clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders. This study examined the influential nodes of psychiatric problems and their associations in this population using network analysis. METHODS: Clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders were consecutively recruited from four major psychiatric hospitals in China from May 22 to July 15, 2020. Depressive and anxiety syndromes (depression and anxiety hereafter), insomnia, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), pain, and fatigue were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire, General Anxiety Disorder, Insomnia Severity Index, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version, and Numeric Rating Scales for pain and fatigue, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 1063 participants were included. The network analysis revealed that depression was the most influential node followed by anxiety as indicated by the centrality index of strength. In contrast, the edge connecting depression and anxiety was the strongest edge, followed by the edge connecting depression and insomnia, and the edge connecting depression and fatigue as indicated by edge-weights. The network structure was invariant by gender based on the network structure invariance test (M = .14, P = .20) and global strength invariance tests (S = .08, P = .30). CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to depression and its associations with anxiety, insomnia, and fatigue in the screening and treatment of mental health problems in clinically stable older psychiatric patients affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Pain , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
7.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(1): 2039017, 2022 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730547

ABSTRACT

Assessment of safety of COVID-19 vaccines is an ongoing process. This study aims to explore long-term adverse events reported by physicians and dentists who received at least two COVID-19 vaccine doses. A group of physicians and dentists were invited to complete a validated questionnaire that was composed of items on: socio-demographics, medical history, administered vaccines, and long-term adverse events (LTAE). Data of a total of 498 practitioners were included. Age ranged from 22 to 71 years (mean age= 35.75 ± 11.74) with a female majority (N = 348, 69.9%). The most frequently administered vaccines were Pfizer-BioNtech, Sinopharm and AstraZeneca vaccines. A total of 80 (16.0%) participants reported LTAEs which were mainly fatigue, menstrual disturbances, myalgia, arthralgia, dizziness, and headache (N = 32, 15, 8, 6, 4, and 4, respectively). There was no statistically significant association between LTAEs and: age, gender, or medical history (P > .05). The collective symptoms of fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, dizziness, and headache were significantly associated with Sinopharm vaccine (P = .04). This was further confirmed by general linear multivariate model analysis. Less than 20% of COVID-19 vaccine recipients may complain of LTAEs that are mostly fatigue-related. It seems that factors such as age, gender, and medical status play a negligible role in development of these AEs. On the other hand, Sinopharm vaccine showed the highest significant association with these AEs followed by AstraZeneca vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Adult , Aged , Arthralgia/chemically induced , Arthralgia/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Dentists , Dizziness , Fatigue/chemically induced , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Jordan , Middle Aged , Myalgia/chemically induced , Myalgia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Young Adult
8.
World J Pediatr ; 18(3): 149-159, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729410

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptom presentations in adults and children appear to run their course within a couple of weeks. However, a subgroup of adults has started to emerge with effects lasting several months or more after initial infection, which raises questions about the long-term physical, mental and social health effects of COVID-19 in the pediatric population. The purpose of this review was to determine these impacts well into the second year of the pandemic. METHODS: A search was conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, and Cochrane between 11/1/2019 and 9/1/2021. Search inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) COVID-19 illness and symptoms in children; (2) severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 in children; (3) English language; and (4) human studies only. RESULTS: The few studies that have documented long-term physical symptoms in children show that fatigue, difficulty in concentrating (brain fog), sleep disturbances, and sensory problems are the most reported outcomes. Most studies examining the impact of COVID-19 in pediatric populations have focused on initial clinical presentation, and symptoms, which are similar to those in adult populations. In addition, COVID-19 has had a moderate impact on children and adolescents' social environment, which may exacerbate current and future physiological, psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: There are limited studies reporting long physical symptoms of COVID-19 in the pediatric population. However, pediatric COVID-19 cases are underreported due to low rates of testing and symptomatic infection, which calls for more longitudinal studies. Children who have experienced COVID-19 illness should be monitored for long physiological, psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Examination , SARS-CoV-2
9.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 47, 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid shift to online education due to COVID-19 quarantine challenged students' ability to accept pure online learning without negative consequences for their physical, emotional and mental health. Some educational institutions introduced new strategies to reduce the psychosocial burden associated with online learning during home confinement. Thus, the primary aims were to determine the consequences of COVID-19 for the psychological well-being and fatigue levels of higher education students and to explore the effects of a new academic assessment approach in reducing home confinement stress. METHOD: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among students, from 30 August to 30 September 2020, of 7 disciplines in all 16 higher colleges of technology in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The Mental Well-being and Learning Behaviours Scale and the modified Copenhagen Burnout Inventory were used to evaluate students' psychological well-being and fatigue levels. A Welch t-test and Welch ANOVA were performed to determine the differences in perceived psychological well-being associated with students' characteristics. Second, Kruskal_Wallis and Mann_Whitney were performed to determine the differences in fatigue level based on students' characteristics. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred students participated. The majority were female (78.5%) and aged from 21-25 years (58.1%). Around 14% of respondents were married with children. Nearly 40% were satisfied with the new assessment approach introduced during the COVID pandemic and 45.5% perceived it as having reduced their home confinement stress. The mean psychological distress score of 3.00 (SD ± 0.71) indicates a moderate impact of COVID-19 on psychological well-being. Students' psychological distress was positively correlated with fatigue level (0.256, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with the perceived impact of the new assessment approach on student lifestyle (- 0.133, p < 0.001), physical health (- 0.149, p < 0.001) and coping with stress (- 0.125, p < 0.001). Male students experienced significantly lower fatigue and better psychological well-being than female students. CONCLUSION: The study reveals that new assessment approaches which emerged during home confinement reduced students' perception of stress and of impaired lifestyle. However, students still had a considerable burden of psychological distress, requiring further preventive measures to maintain their psychological well-being during future outbreak events. Educational institutions should consider additional strategies to improve students' preparedness for online teaching, which could help maintain their psychological well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Universities , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e055909, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723806

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to explore the attenuated impact of reported avoidance behaviours adherence on the transmission of COVID-19 through cross-sectional surveys in Hong Kong, in order to make up for the lack of research on avoidance behaviours fatigue. DESIGN: 40 cross-sectional telephone surveys. SETTING: All districts in Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: 31 332 Cantonese or English-speaking participants at age of 18 years or above. METHODS: We collected data on behaviours and estimated the average effective reproduction number ([Formula: see text]) among the Hong Kong adult population during the COVID-19 epidemic wave in November-December 2020 and compared with the preceding epidemic in June-July 2020. RESULTS: We observed a reduction in adherence to voluntary avoidance behaviours due to pandemic fatigue, but continued adherence to regulated avoidance behaviours. The average [Formula: see text] during the post-work from home period was higher in November-December wave with estimated [Formula: see text] of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.75 to 0.87) compared with the June-July wave with an [Formula: see text] of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.60 to 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: The declined effectiveness of social distancing interventions in reducing COVID-19 transmission was associated with fatigue with voluntary avoidance behaviours in Hong Kong population, implying a need for the government to reinvigorate the public to maintain effective pandemic control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Avoidance Learning , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/prevention & control , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
11.
Nurs Open ; 9(3): 1744-1756, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707647

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe the state of health of Quebec nursing staff during the pandemic according to their exposure to COVID-19, work-related characteristics and sociodemographic factors (gender, generational age group). State of health was captured essentially by assessing psychological distress, depression symptoms and fatigue. DESIGN AND METHODS: A large-scale cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,708 nurses and licenced practical nurses in Quebec (87% women, mean age of 41 ± 11 years). The survey included several questionnaires and validated health-related scales (psychological distress, depression symptoms and fatigue). The STROBE guidelines were followed in reporting the study's findings. RESULTS: Results showed that the prevalence of psychological distress and depression symptoms was moderate to severe. Women, generation Xers and Yers, nurses who cared for COVID-19 patients and those with a colleague who was infected with COVID-19 at work scored higher for fatigue, psychological distress and depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Psychological Distress , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 292, 2022 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690932

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Work fatigue is a work-related condition that affects physicians' health, work attitude safety and performance. Work fatigue affects not only medical workers but can also leave a negative impact on patients. With the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the economic crisis Lebanese doctors have been facing in the last 2 years, the aim of our study was to validate the 3D-Work Fatigue Inventory (3D-WFI) among Lebanese physicians and assess the rate and correlates of work fatigue (physical, mental and emotional). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken through an anonymous self-administered questionnaire between October 2020 and January 2021. The SPSS AMOS software v.24 was used to conduct confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). To validate the 3D-WFI, multiple indices of goodness-of-fit were described: the Relative Chi-square (χ2/df) (cut-off values:< 2-5), the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) (close and acceptable fit are considered for values < 0.05 and < 0.11 respectively), the Tucker Lewis Index (TLI) and the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) (acceptable values are ≥0.90). RESULTS: A total of 401 responses was collected; 66.1, 64.8 and 65.1% respondents had an intermediate to high level of emotional, mental and physical work fatigue respectively. The fit indices obtained in the CFA of the 3D-WFI items fitted well: CFI =0.98, TLI =0.98, RMSEA = 0.05; 95% CI 0.046-0.063; pclose = 0.20) and χ2(136) = 295.76. The correlation coefficients between the three factors (Factor 1 = Physical work fatigue, Factor 2 = Mental work fatigue, Factor 3 = Emotional work fatigue) were adequate as well: Factor 1-Factor 2 (r = 0.70), Factor 1-Factor 3 (r = 0.52) and Factor 2-Factor 3 (r = 0.65). In addition, feeling pressured by long working hours during the pandemic, having more hours of night duty per month, more stressful events in life, and higher depression were significantly associated with more physical and mental work fatigue. Higher depression and having more stressful events in life were significantly associated with more emotional work fatigue. CONCLUSION: Work fatigue in Lebanese physicians seems to be associated with higher level of everyday stress, high work load and depression. Hospitals and local health authorities can use these results for early interventions that aim to reduce work fatigue and ensure the wellbeing of Lebanese physicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Cross-Sectional Studies , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 74, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690924

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the current scenario of the COVID-19 pandemic and the social distancing issues, distance learning was implemented in many medical schools. Educational institutions faced the challenge of continuing to promote teaching and learning while keeping teachers and students in their homes, aiming to reduce the spread of the virus. This change compromised the students' mental health, due to the degree of exhaustion or fatigue attributed to the involvement in videoconferences, called "zoom fatigue". Despite the importance of zoom fatigue for medical education, it can be observed that there have not been studies on the role of the online teaching and learning process through active methodologies in the genesis of this fatigue. We aimed to assess the association of the teaching method used and the prevalence of zoom fatigue. METHODS: A cross-sectional, quantitative, analytical study was carried out in Medical Schools of Ceará, Brazil. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) teaching methodology is the only methodology used in the first semester and PBL together with traditional teaching, i.e., hybrid teaching, is used in the other ones. The Zoom Exhaustion & Fatigue Scale (ZEF) was used, with the questions currently validated for Brazilian Portuguese. Chi-square tests were used to verify the statistical association between the measured variables and the teaching methodology. RESULTS: The prevalence of zoom fatigue reached 56% in students using the hybrid model, versus 41% in those using the PBL methodology, with a statistically significant difference (p value = 0.027). The mean prevalence of overall zoom fatigue was 48%. Students using the hybrid methodology differed from PBL students by having a significantly higher frequency of feelings of wanting to be alone after a videoconference (16.9 vs. 7.1%, respectively) and needing time to be alone after a video conference (10.2 vs. 3.6%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Considering that zoom fatigue may stay with us for years beyond the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to know and provide instructions on how to reduce video conferencing fatigue. The present study suggests that the active participation of students and the number of activities are important factors to be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 41(4): 515-545, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long COVID-19 may affect patients after hospital discharge. AIMS: This study aims to describe the burden of the long-term persistence of clinical symptoms in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review by using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline. The PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies that included information on the prevalence of somatic clinical symptoms lasting at least 4 weeks after the onset of a PCR- or serology-confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. The prevalence of persisting clinical symptoms was assessed and risk factors were described when investigated. Psychological symptoms and cognitive disorders were not evaluated in this study. RESULTS: Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Eighteen studies involved in-patients only with a duration of follow-up of either less than 12 weeks, 12 weeks to 6 months, or more. In these studies, fatigue (16-64%), dyspnea (15-61%), cough (2-59%), arthralgia (8-55%), and thoracic pain (5-62%) were the most frequent persisting symptoms. In nineteen studies conducted in a majority of out-patients, the persistence of these symptoms was lower and 3% to 74% of patients reported prolonged smell and taste disorders. The main risk factors for persisting symptoms were being female, older, having comorbidities and severity at the acute phase of the disease. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients should have access to dedicated multidisciplinary healthcare allowing a holistic approach. Effective outpatient care for patients with long-COVID-19 requires coordination across multiple sub-specialties, which can be proposed in specialized post-COVID units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Neurol Sci ; 43(2): 1007-1014, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669827

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the concordance between Google Maps® application (GM®) and clinical practice measurements of ambulatory function (e.g., Ambulation Score (AS) and respective Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)) in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional multicenter study. AS and EDSS were calculated using GM® and routine clinical methods; the correspondence between the two methods was assessed. A multinomial logistic model is investigated which demographic (age, sex) and clinical features (e.g., disease subtype, fatigue, depression) might have influenced discrepancies between the two methods. RESULTS: Two hundred forty-three pwMS were included; discrepancies in AS and in EDDS assessments between GM® and routine clinical methods were found in 81/243 (33.3%) and 74/243 (30.4%) pwMS, respectively. Progressive phenotype (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-7.11, p = 0.03), worse fatigue (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 1.01-1.06, p = 0.01), and more severe depression (OR = 1.1; 95% CI 1.04-1.17, p = 0.002) were associated with discrepancies between GM® and routine clinical scoring. CONCLUSION: GM® could easily be used in a real-life clinical setting to calculate the AS and the related EDSS scores. GM® should be considered for validation in further clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Multiple Sclerosis , Search Engine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis
17.
J Infect ; 84(4): 566-572, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670759

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Residual symptoms can be detected for several months after COVID-19. To better understand the predictors and impact of symptom persistence we analyzed a prospective cohort of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Patients were followed for 9 months after COVID-19 onset. Duration and predictors of persistence of symptoms, physical health and psychological distress were assessed. RESULTS: 465 patients (54% males, 51% hospitalized) were included; 37% presented with at least 4 symptoms and 42% complained of symptom lasting more than 28 days. At month 9, 20% of patients were still symptomatic, showing mainly fatigue (11%) and breathlessness (8%). Hospitalization and ICU stay vs. non-hospitalized status increased the median duration of fatigue of 8 weeks. Age > 50 years (OR 2.50), ICU stay (OR 2.35), and presentation with 4 or more symptoms (OR 2.04) were independent predictors of persistence of symptoms at month 9. A total of 18% of patients did not return to optimal pre-COVID physical health, while 19% showed psychological distress at month 9. Hospital admission (OR 2.28) and persistence of symptoms at day 28 (OR 2.21) and month 9 (OR 5.16) were independent predictors of suboptimal physical health, while female gender (OR 5.27) and persistence of symptoms at day 28 (OR 2.42) and month 9 (OR 2.48) were risk factors for psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with advanced age, ICU stay and multiple symptoms at onset were more likely to suffer from long-term symptoms, which had a negative impact on both physical and mental wellbeing. This study contributes to identify the target populations and Long COVID consequences for planning long-term recovery interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Front Public Health ; 9: 812737, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662638

ABSTRACT

Background: In China, sickness presenteeism, job burnout, and fatigue are common among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. We propose the prevalence of sickness presenteeism can adversely affect nurses' physical and mental health, negatively impact their work productivity and quality, and pose a threat to patients' safety. Therefore, this study examines the mechanism of productivity loss caused by sickness presenteeism, fatigue, and job burnout. Objectives: To investigate the serial-multiple mediating effect of job burnout and fatigue in the relationship between sickness presenteeism and productivity loss among nurses. Methods: A multicenter cross-sectional survey was undertaken by administering an online questionnaire from December 2020 to May 2021. Stratified cluster sampling was used to include 3,491 nurses from 14 hospitals in Shandong Province, China. Variables were measured using the Sickness Presenteeism Questionnaire, Stanford Presenteeism Scale, Chalder Fatigue Scale, and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data analyses were carried out using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, independent-samples t-test, Pearson correlation analysis, hierarchical regression, and bootstrapping method. Results: From the 3,491 nurses who volunteered in this online survey, only 2,968 valid questionnaires were returned. Sickness presenteeism exhibited a prevalence of 70.6% during the COVID-19 pandemic. The average score of health-related productivity loss was 15.05 ± 4.52, fatigue was 8.48 ± 3.40, and job burnout was 39.14 ± 19.64. Sickness presenteeism was positively associated with fatigue and job burnout while job burnout was positively associated with nurse fatigue. Sickness presenteeism, fatigue, and job burnout were also positively correlated with health-related productivity loss. Statistically significant paths via the single mediation of fatigue and job burnout were established. A statistically significant serial-multiple mediating effect of fatigue and job burnout on the association between sickness presenteeism and productivity loss accounted for 35.12% of the total effect size. Conclusions: There was a high incidence of sickness presenteeism and job burnout among Chinese nurses. High-frequency sickness presenteeism may result in increased productivity loss through the two mediating effects of fatigue and job burnout. Sickness presenteeism may increase fatigue, promote job burnout, and result in increased productivity loss among Chinese nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625418

ABSTRACT

How does future anxiety caused by the COVID-19 pandemic relate to people's willingness to remain vigilant and adhere to preventive measures? We examined the mediating role of message fatigue and the moderating role of autonomy satisfaction in the relationship between future anxiety due to COVID-19 and willingness to remain vigilant. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with adults residing in the United States in June 2021 when numerous U.S. states re-opened following the CDC's relaxed guidelines for fully vaccinated individuals. Our data showed that message fatigue mediated the relationship between future anxiety due to the pandemic and willingness to remain vigilant. The data further revealed that autonomy satisfaction significantly moderated the mediation. Namely, the role of message fatigue in the indirect relationship between future anxiety and willingness to remain vigilant was significant only among people low to moderate in autonomy satisfaction; its role in the indirect path was not significant for those high in autonomy satisfaction. Notably, independent of the mechanism involving message fatigue, future anxiety was directly and positively associated with willingness to remain vigilant regardless of the levels of autonomy satisfaction. Implications of these findings are discussed in light of psychological and behavioral responses to the current pandemic and policy directions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Front Public Health ; 9: 774553, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581111

ABSTRACT

The workload in the Infection Disease Nursing Unit (IDNU) is increasing dramatically due to COVID-19, and leads to the prevalence of fatigue among the frontline nurses, threatening their health, and safety. The built environment and design could fundamentally affect the fatigue of nurses for a long-term perspective. This article aims to extract the environmental factors of IDNU and explore nurses' perceptions of these factors on the work-related fatigue. It would produce evidences for mitigating the fatigue by environmental interferons. A cross-sectional design was employed by combination of focus group interview and written survey. Environmental factors of IDNU were collected from healthcare design experts (n = 8). Nurses (n = 64) with frontline COVID-19 experiences in IDNU were recruited to assess these factors individually. Four environmental factors were identified as: Nursing Distance (ND), Spatial Crowdness (SC), Natural Ventilation, and Light (NVL), and Spatial Privacy (SP). Among them, ND was considered as the most influential factor on the physical fatigue, while SP was on the psychological fatigue. Generally, these environmental factors were found to be more influential on the physical fatigue than the psychological fatigue. Technical titles were found to be associated with the nurses' perceptions of fatigue by these environmental factors. Nurse assistant and practical nurse were more likely to suffer from the physical fatigue by these factors than senior nurse. The result indicated that environmental factors of IDNU were associated with the nurses' fatigue, particularly on the physical aspect. Environmental interventions of design could be adopted to alleviate the fatigue by these factors such as reducing the ND and improving the spatial privacy. The accurate interventional measures should be applied to fit nurses' conditions due to their technical titles. More attention should be given to the low-ranking nurses, who account for the majority and are much vulnerable to the physical fatigue by environmental factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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