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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789455

ABSTRACT

The study of the origin and implications of fatigue in exercise has been widely investigated, but not completely understood given the complex multifactorial mechanisms involved. Then, it is essential to understand the fatigue mechanism to help trainers and physicians to prescribe an adequate training load. The present narrative review aims to analyze the multifactorial factors of fatigue in physical exercise. To reach this aim, a consensus and critical review were performed using both primary sources, such as scientific articles, and secondary ones, such as bibliographic indexes, web pages, and databases. The main search engines were PubMed, SciELO, and Google Scholar. Central and peripheral fatigue are two unison constructs part of the Integrative Governor theory, in which both psychological and physiological drives and requirements are underpinned by homeostatic principles. The relative activity of each one is regulated by dynamic negative feedback activity, as the fundamental general operational controller. Fatigue is conditioned by factors such as gender, affecting men and women differently. Sleep deprivation or psychological disturbances caused, for example, by stress, can affect neural activation patterns, realigning them and slowing down simple mental operations in the context of fatigue. Then, fatigue can have different origins not only related with physiological factors. Therefore, all these prisms must be considered for future approaches from sport and clinical perspectives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sports , Exercise/psychology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
4.
NeuroRehabilitation ; 48(4): 469-480, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226969

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients present long-lasting physical and neuropsychological impairment, which may require rehabilitation. OBJECTIVES: The current cross-sectional study characterizes post COVID-19 sequelae and persistent symptoms in patients in an outpatient rehabilitation program. METHODS: Thirty patients [16 post-ICU and 14 non-ICU; median age = 54(43.8-62) years; 19 men] presenting sequelae and/or persistent symptoms (>3 months after acute COVID-19) were selected of 41 patients referred for neurorehabilitation. Patients underwent physical, neuropsychological and respiratory evaluation and assessment of impact of fatigue and quality of life. RESULTS: The main reasons for referral to rehabilitation were: fatigue (86.6%), dyspnea (66.7%), subjective cognitive impairment (46.7%) and neurological sequelae (33.3%). Post-ICU patient presented sequelae of critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy, stroke and encephalopathy and lower forced vital capacity compared to non-ICU patients. Cognitive impairment was found in 63.3% of patients, with a similar profile in both sub-groups. Increased physical fatigue, anxiety and depression and low quality of life were prevalent irrespective of acute COVID-19 severity. CONCLUSIONS: The variability of post COVID-19 physical and neuropsychological impairment requires a complex screening process both in ICU and non-ICU patients. The high impact of persistent symptoms on daily life activities and quality of life, regardless of acute infection severity, indicate need for rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Cognitive Dysfunction/rehabilitation , Fatigue/rehabilitation , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuropsychological Tests , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(3): 330-344, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192097

ABSTRACT

In response to the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global health pandemic, many employees transitioned to remote work, which included remote meetings. With this sudden shift, workers and the media began discussing videoconference fatigue, a potentially new phenomenon of feeling tired and exhausted attributed to a videoconference. In the present study, we examine the nature of videoconference fatigue, when this phenomenon occurs, and what videoconference characteristics are associated with fatigue using a mixed-methods approach. Thematic analysis of qualitative responses indicates that videoconference fatigue exists, often in near temporal proximity to the videoconference, and is affected by various videoconference characteristics. Quantitative data were collected each hour during five workdays from 55 employees who were working remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Latent growth modeling results suggest that videoconferences at different times of the day are related to deviations in employee fatigue beyond what is expected based on typical fatigue trajectories. Results from multilevel modeling of 279 videoconference meetings indicate that turning off the microphone and having higher feelings of group belongingness are related to lower postvideoconference fatigue. Additional analyses suggest that higher levels of group belongingness are the most consistent protective factor against videoconference fatigue. Such findings have immediate practical implications for workers and organizations as they continue to navigate the still relatively new terrain of remote work. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Fatigue/etiology , Social Identification , Social Isolation , Teleworking , Videoconferencing , Adolescent , Adult , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Protective Factors , Qualitative Research , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors , Young Adult
6.
Anesth Analg ; 132(5): 1338-1343, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186597

ABSTRACT

The negative impacts of sleep deprivation and fatigue have long been recognized. Numerous studies have documented the ill effects of impaired alertness associated with the disruption of the sleep-wake cycle; these include an increased incidence of human error-related accidents, increased morbidity and mortality, and an overall decrement in social, financial, and human productivity. While there are multiple studies on the impact of sleep deprivation and fatigue in resident physicians, far fewer have examined the effects on attending physicians, and only a handful addresses the accumulated effects of chronic sleep disturbances on acute sleep loss during a night call-shift. Moreover, the rapid and unprecedented spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic significantly increased the level of anxiety and stress on the physical, psychological, and the economic well-being of the entire world, with heightened effect on frontline clinicians. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate the emotional and physical toll of the pandemic in clinicians, and its impact on sleep health, general well-being, and performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence/standards , Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology , Sleep Deprivation/psychology , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/psychology , Humans
7.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(3): e26293, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviors and physical activity are likely to be affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, and sedentary lifestyles can increase subjective fatigue. The nonpharmaceutical policies imposed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic may also have adverse effects on fatigue. OBJECTIVE: This study has two aims: to examine the changes in sedentary behaviors and physical activity of company workers in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan and to examine relationships between changes in these sedentary behaviors and physical activity and changes in fatigue. METHODS: Data from a nationwide prospective online survey conducted in 2019 and 2020 were used. On February 22, 2019, an email with a link to participate in the study was sent to 45,659 workers, aged 20 to 59 years, who were randomly selected from a database of approximately 1 million individuals. A total of 2466 and 1318 participants, who self-reported their occupation as company workers, answered the baseline and follow-up surveys, respectively. Surveys captured fatigue, workday and daily domain-specific sedentary behaviors and physical activity, and total sedentary behaviors and physical activity. We used multivariable linear regression models to estimate associations of changes in sedentary behaviors and physical activity with changes in fatigue. RESULTS: Increases in public transportation sitting during workdays, other leisure sitting time during workdays, and other leisure sitting time were associated with an increase in the motivation aspect of fatigue (b=0.29, 95% CI 0-0.57, P=.048; b=0.40, 95% CI 0.18-0.62, P<.001; and b=0.26, 95% CI 0.07-0.45, P=.007, respectively). Increases in work-related sitting time during workdays, total sitting time during workdays, and total work-related sitting time were significantly associated with an increase in the physical activity aspect of fatigue (b=0.06, 95% CI 0-0.12, P=.03; b=0.05, 95% CI 0.01-0.09, P=.02; and b=0.07, 95% CI 0-0.14, P=.04, respectively). The motivation and physical activity aspects of fatigue increased by 0.06 for each 1-hour increase in total sitting time between baseline and follow-up (b=0.06, 95% CI 0-0.11, P=.045; and b=0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.10, P=.009, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrated that sedentary and active behaviors among company workers in Japan were negatively affected during the COVID-19 outbreak. Increases in several domain-specific sedentary behaviors also contributed to unfavorable changes in workers' fatigue. Social distancing and teleworking amid a pandemic may contribute to the sedentary lifestyle of company workers. Public health interventions are needed to mitigate the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic or future pandemics on sedentary and physical activity behaviors and fatigue among company workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise/physiology , Fatigue/psychology , Sedentary Behavior , Adult , Female , Humans , Internet , Japan , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Physical Distancing , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/statistics & numerical data
8.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(4): 440-447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to abrupt restrictions of life-space mobility. The impact of shelter-in-place orders on older adults' health and well-being is still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between life-space mobility and quality of life (QoL) in older adults with and without frailty during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Multicenter prospective cohort study based on structured telephone interviews. SETTING: Four geriatric outpatient clinics in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 557 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older. MEASUREMENTS: The Life-Space Assessment was used to measure community mobility before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and a previously validated decrease of ≥ 5 points defined restricted life-space mobility. Frailty was assessed through the FRAIL (fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight) scale. The impact of shelter-in-place orders on QoL was evaluated with the question «How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting your QoL?¼, to which participants could respond «not at all¼, «to some extent¼, or «to a great extent¼. We used ordinal logistic regressions to investigate the relationship between restricted life-space mobility and impact on QoL, adjusting our analyses for demographics, frailty, comorbidities, cognition, functionality, loneliness, depression, and anxiety. We explored whether frailty modified the association between life-space mobility and impact on QoL. RESULTS: Participants were on average 80±8 years old, 65% were women, and 33% were frail. The COVID-19 quarantine led to a restriction of community mobility in 79% of participants and affected the QoL for 77% of participants. We found that restricted life-space mobility was associated with impact on QoL in older adults during the pandemic, although frailty modified the magnitude of the association (P-value for interaction=0.03). Frail participants who experienced restricted life-space mobility had twice the odds of reporting an impact on QoL when compared with non-frail individuals, with respective adjusted odds ratios of 4.20 (95% CI=2.36-7.50) and 2.18 (95% CI=1.33-3.58). CONCLUSION: Older adults experienced substantial decreases in life-space mobility during the COVID-19 pandemic, and this unexpected change impacted their QoL. Providers should be particularly watchful for the consequences of abrupt life-space restrictions on frail individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Frail Elderly/psychology , Frailty/psychology , Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , Brazil , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Independent Living , Interviews as Topic , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(5): 1073-1085, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Most SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals never require hospitalization. However, some develop prolonged symptoms. We sought to characterize the spectrum of neurologic manifestations in non-hospitalized Covid-19 "long haulers". METHODS: This is a prospective study of the first 100 consecutive patients (50 SARS-CoV-2 laboratory-positive (SARS-CoV-2+ ) and 50 laboratory-negative (SARS-CoV-2- ) individuals) presenting to our Neuro-Covid-19 clinic between May and November 2020. Due to early pandemic testing limitations, patients were included if they met Infectious Diseases Society of America symptoms of Covid-19, were never hospitalized for pneumonia or hypoxemia, and had neurologic symptoms lasting over 6 weeks. We recorded the frequency of neurologic symptoms and analyzed patient-reported quality of life measures and standardized cognitive assessments. RESULTS: Mean age was 43.2 ± 11.3 years, 70% were female, and 48% were evaluated in televisits. The most frequent comorbidities were depression/anxiety (42%) and autoimmune disease (16%). The main neurologic manifestations were: "brain fog" (81%), headache (68%), numbness/tingling (60%), dysgeusia (59%), anosmia (55%), and myalgias (55%), with only anosmia being more frequent in SARS-CoV-2+ than SARS-CoV-2- patients (37/50 [74%] vs. 18/50 [36%]; p < 0.001). Moreover, 85% also experienced fatigue. There was no correlation between time from disease onset and subjective impression of recovery. Both groups exhibited impaired quality of life in cognitive and fatigue domains. SARS-CoV-2+ patients performed worse in attention and working memory cognitive tasks compared to a demographic-matched US population (T-score 41.5 [37, 48.25] and 43 [37.5, 48.75], respectively; both p < 0.01). INTERPRETATION: Non-hospitalized Covid-19 "long haulers" experience prominent and persistent "brain fog" and fatigue that affect their cognition and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Fatigue/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/etiology , Headache/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Prospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods
10.
Work ; 68(2): 297-303, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is mostly transmitted through respiratory droplets. One of the exposure methods pf this disease is through occupational exposures and, thereby, a large number of people are prone to catching this disease due to their occupations. Nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic are at the forefront of healthcare. There is no information about the level of resilience and the demographic and job factors predicting resilience in the critical conditions of this occupational group. OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to determine the resilience score and its predictive demographic factors among the nurses working at the hospitals involved with COVID-19 in Ahvaz, Iran. METHODS: 387 nurses from Ahvaz hospitals participated in this study. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) was used to assess resilience. Demographic information was also collected using a designed questionnaire. Since the present study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, the questionnaires were sent online. Data were entered into software SPSS (version 23) and T-test, ANOVA and regression methods were used for data analysis. RESULTS: The mean score of 61.18 (±14.8) was obtained for CD-RISC. The results of this study showed that age (r = 0.610, P = 0.003), work experience (r = 0.572, P = 0.030), and level of education (r = 0.514, P = 0.044) had a significant positive correlation with nurses' resilience score during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multiple regression analysis indicated that work experience and level of education were the predictors of nurses' resilience (R2 = 0.15). CONCLUSION: The score of nurses' resilience was low. Based on the results, education and work experience were determined as the contributing factors for resilience. The findings can help to better understand effective and predictive demographic factors to achieve higher resilience in stressful situations.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Fatigue/etiology , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(2)2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033666

ABSTRACT

The study analyzes sensory processing sensitivity and the compassion satisfaction as risk/protective factors against burnout and compassion fatigue, during the first period of the COVID-19 health emergency. A sample of 1566 Spanish adult healthcare (n = 694) and education (n = 872) professionals was evaluated. An ad hoc questionnaire for sociodemographic data, and the highly sensitive person scale (HSPS), Maslach burnout inventory (MBI) and professional quality of life scale (ProQOL-vIV) were administered. Burnout and compassion fatigue were observed in the healthcare and education professionals, where personal realization and depersonalization were higher in healthcare and compassion fatigue in education. The protective role of compassion satisfaction was confirmed, as was sensory processing sensitivity as a risk factor, except for its low sensory threshold dimension, which positively influenced personal realization. The findings of this study demonstrate the presence of burnout and compassion fatigue in healthcare and education professionals, displaying compassion fatigue as an emerging psychosocial risk in education, which was made more severe under the conditions of study, which is at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of incorporating adequate management strategies for high sensitivity, empathy and compassion satisfaction in prevention programs is emphasized.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Empathy/physiology , Fatigue/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Perception , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
J Neurol Sci ; 420: 117271, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023663

ABSTRACT

More than half of patients who recover from COVID-19 experience fatigue. We studied fatigue using neuropsychological and neurophysiological investigations in post-COVID-19 patients and healthy subjects. Neuropsychological assessment included: Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Fatigue Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Apathy Evaluation Scale, cognitive tests, and computerized tasks. Neurophysiological examination was assessed before (PRE) and 2 min after (POST) a 1-min fatiguing isometric pinching task and included: maximum compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude in first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) following ulnar nerve stimulation, resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and silent period (SP) duration in right FDI following transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left motor cortex. Maximum pinch strength was measured. Perceived exertion was assessed with the Borg-Category-Ratio scale. Patients manifested fatigue, apathy, executive deficits, impaired cognitive control, and reduction in global cognition. Perceived exertion was higher in patients. CMAP and MEP were smaller in patients both PRE and POST. CMAP did not change in either group from PRE to POST, while MEP amplitudes declined in controls POST. SP duration did not differ between groups PRE, increased in controls but decreased in patients POST. Patients' change of SP duration from PRE to POST was negatively correlated to FSS. Abnormal SP shortening and lack of MEP depression concur with a reduction in post-exhaustion corticomotor inhibition, suggesting a possible GABAB-ergic dysfunction. This impairment might be related to the neuropsychological alterations. COVID-19-associated inflammation might lead to GABAergic impairment, possibly representing the basis of fatigue and explaining apathy and executive deficits.


Subject(s)
Action Potentials/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Executive Function/physiology , Fatigue/virology , Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Evoked Potentials, Motor/physiology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Motor Cortex/physiopathology , Neuropsychological Tests , Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
13.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243884, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967114

ABSTRACT

PURPOSES: Since a considerable number of health care workers (HCWs) were sent to Wuhan to aid COVID-19 control during the epidemic, non-frontline HCWs who stayed in local hospitals had to work overload to provide daily health care services for other health issues, which makes them more vulnerable to experience fatigue. Self-efficacy is suggested as a protective factor for fatigue. Nonetheless, less is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. This research aimed to explore the prevalence of fatigue among non-frontline HCWs during the pandemic, investigate the mediating effect of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and moderating effect of negative coping in the association between self-efficacy and fatigue. METHODS: General Self-Efficacy Scale, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire and 14-item Fatigue Scale were administrated to 527 non-frontline HCWs from Anhui Province, China. The mediating effect was examined by Mackinnon's four-step procedure, while Hayes PROCESS macro was used to test the moderated mediation model. RESULTS: The prevalence of fatigue among non-frontline HCWs was 56.7%. The effect of self-efficacy on fatigue was partially mediated by PTSD symptoms (ab = -0.146, SE = 0.030, 95% CI = [-0.207, -0.095]). Additionally, negative coping moderated both the direct effect of self-efficacy on fatigue (ß = -0.158, P<0.001) and the mediating effect of PTSD symptoms (ß = 0.077, P = 0.008). When the standard score of negative coping increased to 1.49 and over, the direct association between self-efficacy and fatigue became insignificant. Likewise, the effect of self-efficacy on PTSD symptoms had no statistical significance when the standard score of negative coping was -1.40 and lower. CONCLUSIONS: More than half non-frontline HCWs suffered from fatigue during COVID-19. For those who tend to use negative coping, it might be crucial to design programs combining the enhancement of self-efficacy, preventions for PTSD symptoms and interventions for fatigue.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Self Efficacy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
14.
Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) ; 69(5): 227-232, 2020 Nov.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871703

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has swept through our hospitals which have had to adapt as a matter of urgency. We are aware that a health crisis of this magnitude is likely to generate mental disorders particularly affecting exposed healthcare workers. Being so brutal and global, this one-of the kind pandemic has been impacting the staff in their professional sphere but also within their private circle. The COV IMPACT study is an early assessment survey conducted for 2 weeks in May 2020, of the perception by all hospital workers of the changes induced in their professional activity by the pandemic. The study was carried out by a survey sent to the hospital staff of Béziers and Montfermeil. The readjusted working conditions were source of increased physical fatigue for 62 % of the respondents. Moral exhaustion was reported by 36 %. It was related to the stress of contracting the infection (72 %) but above all of transmitting it to relatives (89 %) with a broad perception of a vital risk (41 %). This stress affected all socio-professional categories (CSP) and was independent of exposure to COVID. Change in organisation, lack of information and protective gear and equipment were major factors of insecurity at the start of the epidemic. Work on supportive measures is necessary. It should focus on the spread of information, particularly towards the youngest, as well as bringing more psychological support and a larger amount of medical equipment, beyond healthcare workers and the COVID sectors.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Family , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/psychology , France/epidemiology , Health Surveys , Humans , Information Dissemination , Middle Aged , Morale , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
15.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 77(1): 67-73, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), most vulnerable individuals are seniors, especially those with comorbidities. More attention needs to been paid to the COVID-19 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the top age-related neurodegenerative disease. OBJECTIVE: Since it is unclear whether AD patients are prone to COVID-19 infection and progression to severe stages, we report for the first time a retrospective analysis of the clinical characteristics of AD patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of the clinical data of 19 AD patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, compared with 23 non-AD COVID-19 patients admitted at the same time to our hospital. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and treatment data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Between AD patients and non-AD patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, the pneumonia severity was not significantly different. AD patients had a higher clustering onset than non-AD patients. The median duration from symptom onset to hospitalization were shorter in AD patients than non-AD patients, indicating the former were sent to the hospital by their family or from nursing home earlier than the later. The median duration from hospitalization to discharge seemed shorter in AD patients than non-AD patients. Dementia patients seemed less likely to report fatigue. It is noticed that more AD patients might have pericardial effusion than the non-AD patients. CONCLUSION: AD patients with COVID-19 were in milder conditions with a better prognosis than non-AD patients. AD patients who had adequate access to healthcare showed resilience to COVID-19 with shorter hospital stays.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cluster Analysis , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Pleural Effusion/epidemiology , Pleural Effusion/etiology , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/therapy , Prognosis
16.
Curr Med Sci ; 40(4): 625-635, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697010

ABSTRACT

Nurses' work-related fatigue has been recognized as a threat to nurse health and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of fatigue among first-line nurses combating with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, and to analyze its influencing factors on fatigue. A multi-center, descriptive, cross-sectional design with a convenience sample was used. The statistical population consisted of the first-line nurses in 7 tertiary general hospitals from March 3, 2020 to March 10, 2020 in Wuhan of China. A total of 2667 samples from 2768 contacted participants completed the investgation, with a response rate of 96.35%. Social-demographic questionnaire, work-related questionnaire, Fatigue Scale-14, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Chinese Perceived Stress Scale were used to conduct online survey. The descriptive statistic of nurses' social-demographic characteristics was conducted, and the related variables of work, anxiety, depression, perceived stress and fatigue were analyzed by t-tests, nonparametric test and Pearson's correlation analysis. The significant factors which resulted in nurses' fatigue were further analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis. The median score for the first-line nurses' fatigue in Wuhan was 4 (2, 8). The median score of physical and mental fatigue of them was 3 (1, 6) and 1 (0, 3) respectively. According to the scoring criteria, 35.06% nurses (n=935) of all participants were in the fatigue status, their median score of fatigue was 10 (8, 11), and the median score of physical and mental fatigue of them was 7 (5, 8) and 3 (2, 4) respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed the participants in the risk groups of anxiety, depression and perceived stress had higher scores on physical and mental fatigue and the statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the variables and nurses' fatigue, the frequency of exercise and nurses' fatigue had a statistically significant negative correlation, and average daily working hours had a significantly positive correlation with nurses' fatigue, and the frequency of weekly night shift had a low positive correlation with nurses' fatigue (P<0.01). There was a moderate level of fatigue among the first-line nurses fighting against COVID-19 pandemic in Wuhan, China. Government and health authorities need to formulate and take effective intervention strategies according to the relevant risk factors, and undertake preventive measures aimed at reducing health hazards due to increased work-related fatigue among first-line nurses, and to enhance their health status and provide a safe occupational environment worldwide. Promoting both medical and nursing safety while combating with the pandemic currently is warranted.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Fatigue/etiology , Nurses , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Mental Fatigue/epidemiology , Mental Fatigue/etiology , Mental Fatigue/psychology , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Workload/psychology , Young Adult
18.
Am J Infect Control ; 48(6): 592-598, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-38791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly, bringing pressure and challenges to nursing staff. OBJECTIVE: To explore the psychology of nurses caring for COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Using a phenomenological approach, we enrolled 20 nurses who provided care for COVID-19 patients in the First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Science and Technology from January 20, to February 10, 2020. The interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone and were analysed by Colaizzi's 7-step method. RESULTS: The psychological experience of nurses caring for COVID-19 patients can be summarized into 4 themes. First, negative emotions present in early stage consisting of fatigue, discomfort, and helplessness was caused by high-intensity work, fear and anxiety, and concern for patients and family members. Second, self-coping styles included psychological and life adjustment, altruistic acts, team support, and rational cognition. Third, we found growth under pressure, which included increased affection and gratefulness, development of professional responsibility, and self-reflection. Finally, we showed that positive emotions occurred simultaneously with negative emotions. CONCLUSIONS: During an epidemic outbreak, positive and negative emotions of the front-line nurses interweaved and coexisted. In the early stage, negative emotions were dominant and positive emotions appeared gradually. Self-coping styles and psychological growth played an important role in maintaining mental health of nurses.


Subject(s)
Caregivers/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Data Collection , Emotions , Fatigue/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Interview, Psychological , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
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