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1.
Mol Metab ; 53: 101262, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253402

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Obesity, in particular visceral obesity, and insulin resistance emerged as major risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is strongly associated with hemostatic alterations. Because obesity and insulin resistance predispose to thrombotic diseases, we investigated the relationship between hemostatic alterations and body fat distribution in participants at risk for type 2 diabetes. SUBJECTS: Body fat distribution (visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue) and liver fat content of 150 participants - with impaired glucose tolerance and/or impaired fasting glucose - were determined using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Participants underwent precise metabolic characterization and major hemostasis parameters were analyzed. RESULTS: Procoagulant factors (FII, FVII, FVIII, and FIX) and anticoagulant proteins (antithrombin, protein C, and protein S) were significantly associated with body fat distribution. In patients with fatty liver, fibrinogen (298 mg/dl vs. 264 mg/dl, p = 0.0182), FVII (99% vs. 90%, p = 0.0049), FVIII (114% vs. 90%, p = 0.0098), protein C (124% vs. 111%, p = 0.0006), and protein S (109% vs. 89%, p < 0.0001) were higher than in controls. In contrast, antithrombin (97% vs. 102%, p = 0.0025) was higher in control patients. In multivariate analyses controlling for insulin sensitivity, body fat compartments, and genotype variants (PNPLA3I148MM/MI/TM6SF2E167kK/kE), only protein C and protein S remained significantly increased in fatty liver. CONCLUSIONS: Body fat distribution is significantly associated with alterations of procoagulant and anticoagulant parameters. Liver fat plays a key role in the regulation of protein C and protein S, suggesting a potential counteracting mechanism to the prothrombotic state in subjects with prediabetes and fatty liver.


Subject(s)
Body Fat Distribution , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Fatty Liver/epidemiology , Hemostasis/physiology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Fatty Liver/blood , Fatty Liver/diagnosis , Fatty Liver/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Insulin Resistance/physiology , Liver/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Protein C/analysis , Protein C/metabolism , Protein S/analysis , Protein S/metabolism , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Dig Liver Dis ; 53(5): 525-533, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Metabolic diseases are risk factors for severe Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which have a close relationship with metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD). AIMS: To evaluate the presence of MAFLD and fibrosis in patients with COVID-19 and its association with prognosis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study. In hospitalized patients with COVID-19, the presence of liver steatosis was determined by computed tomography scan (CT). Liver fibrosis was assessed using the NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS score), and when altered, the AST to platelet ratio index (APRI) score. Mann-Whitney U, Student´s t-test, logistic regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis were used. RESULTS: 432 patients were analyzed, finding steatosis in 40.6%. No differences in pulmonary involvement on CT scan, treatment, or number of days between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission were found between patients with and without MAFLD. The presence of liver fibrosis was associated with higher severity scores, higher levels of inflammatory markers, requirement of mechanical ventilation, incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI), and higher mortality than patients without fibrosis. CONCLUSION: The presence of fibrosis rather than the presence of MAFLD is associated with increased risk for mechanical ventilation, development of AKI, and higher mortality in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatty Liver , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Fatty Liver/diagnosis , Fatty Liver/epidemiology , Fatty Liver/metabolism , Female , Humans , Liver/diagnostic imaging , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/metabolism , Liver Function Tests/methods , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Research Design , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
3.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 36(1): 204-207, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032413

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has attracted increasing worldwide attention. While diabetes is known to aggravate COVID-19 severity, it is not known whether nondiabetic patients with metabolic dysfunction are also more prone to more severe disease. The association of metabolic associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) with COVID-19 severity in nondiabetic patients was investigated here. METHODS: The study cohort comprised 65 patients with (i.e. cases) and 65 patients without MAFLD (i.e. controls). Each case was randomly matched with one control by sex (1:1) and age (±5 years). The association between the presence of MAFLD (as exposure) and COVID-19 severity (as the outcome) was assessed by binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: In nondiabetic patients with COVID-19, the presence of MAFLD was associated with a four-fold increased risk of severe COVID-19; the risk increased with increasing numbers of metabolic risk factors. The association with COVID-19 severity persisted after adjusting for age, sex, and coexisting morbid conditions. CONCLUSION: Health-care professionals caring for nondiabetic patients with COVID-19 should be cognizant of the increased likelihood of severe COVID-19 in patients with MAFLD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatty Liver/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Case-Control Studies , China , Cohort Studies , Fatty Liver/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(8)2020 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712861

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has presented many diagnostic challenges and uncertainties. Little is known about common pathologies complicating pregnancy and how their behaviour is modified by the presence of SARS-CoV-2. Pregnancy itself can alter the body's response to viral infection, which can cause more severe symptoms. We report the first case of a patient affected with sudden-onset severe pre-eclampsia complicated by acute fatty liver disease of pregnancy, HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet) syndrome and acute kidney injury following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although an initial diagnostic dilemma, a multidisciplinary team approach was required to ensure a favourable outcome for both the mother and the baby. Our case report highlights the need for health professionals caring for pregnant women to be aware of the complex interplay between SARS-CoV-2 infection and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Fatty Liver/complications , HELLP Syndrome/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pre-Eclampsia/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Fatty Liver/blood , Fatty Liver/diagnosis , Female , HELLP Syndrome/blood , Humans , Kidney Function Tests , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pre-Eclampsia/blood , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/blood , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , SARS-CoV-2
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