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1.
Rev Psiquiatr Salud Ment (Engl Ed) ; 15(2): 142-146, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1960002

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact on people's mental health. Patients with eating disorders (ED) are also highly sensitive to the pandemic situation due to their physical and mental health. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic may have had on the reasons for the urgent care of patients with an eating disorder, comparing the reasons for care with those from a previous period. METHOD: We compared the visits to the emergency room and their characteristics before and after the pandemic of patients with an eating disorder in the province of Lleida. Information regarding sociodemographic status, reason for consultation, diagnosis, characteristics of suicidal behaviour, and other data were obtained from the electronic medical records. RESULTS: Within the total emergency attendances, eating disorders increased from 1.7% in the pre-pandemic period to 3.1% during the pandemic (p=0.030). Regarding the reason for consultation, a change in the pattern is observed, decreasing consultations for anxious decompensation (p<0.001) and increasing suicidal behaviour (p=0.016) and behavioural disorder (p=0.022). CONCLUSIONS: In our study we ascertained an increase in urgent care given to patients with an eating disorder during the two states of alarm, while consultations for anxiety symptoms decreased notably. However, care for suicidal behaviour increased, especially in women with comorbidity of personality disorders and who were unemployed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
2.
Hosp Pediatr ; 12(8): 696-702, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933413

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in hospital admissions for adolescents with eating disorders (EDs). However, there is a paucity of information on how this increase has affected hospitalization courses and disposition planning. We sought to describe the changes in hospitalizations for EDs at our institution during the pandemic. METHODS: We reviewed charts of patients admitted to our academic medical center for nutritional restoration from January 1, 2017, to June 30, 2021. We report differences in patient characteristics and hospitalization courses using descriptive statistics and Poisson regression. RESULTS: We reviewed charts for 85 patients for 108 hospital admissions. Admissions increased from 1.4 per month prepandemic to 3.6 per month during the pandemic (P < .001). Most patients were female (91%), White (79%), had private insurance, (80%) and had restrictive eating behaviors (97%). During the pandemic, we found (1) an increase in the average length of stay (12.6 days vs. 18.0 days) with younger age associated with longer length of stay (P < .001); (2) more patients requiring psychotropic medication management (11% vs 31%, P = .01); and (3) fewer patients discharged from the hospital with outpatient therapy (43% vs 24%, P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to an increase in hospital admissions for ED management during the pandemic, our study highlights the evolving needs of ED patients during their hospitalizations. The implications of longer admissions with higher acuity at discharge represent areas where appropriate adaptations in inpatient management and disposition planning may improve the quality of care for ED patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Emergency Service, Hospital , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928565

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and imposed restrictions had negative consequences on overall health among many populations. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the pandemic on eating disorders (ED) and mental health (MH) of individuals with confirmed ED diagnoses. A survey consisting of questions related to (1) diagnosis of COVID-19, (2) changes in ED symptoms and onset of new symptoms, (3) psychological and MH aspects regarding to the pandemic, (4) lifestyle changes, and (5) social media (SM) usage was distributed between April-June 2021. One hundred and ninety-eight individuals met all of the inclusion criteria (nfemales = 195, 98.48%; nother gender = 3, 1.52%). Of the participants, 78.79% reported worsening of their ED symptoms, 42.93% of them noticed an onset of new ED symptoms, and 57.58% believed that the pandemic had a negative impact on their ED treatment. Negative changes due to the pandemic on MH were reported by 88.89%. Of the participants, 91.92% increased their time spent on SM and 54.04% of them declared that it had a negative impact on their MH. Medical professionals should consider results while providing comprehensive psychological care, which can be crucial information in the application of the appropriate treatment strategy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928564

ABSTRACT

Confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic imposes a burden on adolescents worldwide and may seriously impact patients with an eating disorder (ED). The current FRanconian Anorexia Nervosa during COVID-19 (FRANCO) study explored (1) perceived change of depressive and ED symptomology during lockdown, (2) the role of social media, and (3) coping strategies of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients and clinical as well as healthy comparison groups. From June 2021 to September 2021, 222 female adolescents (19 with AN, 20 with depression, 45 with a self-reported psychiatric disorder (SRPD), and 138 controls) aged 11.2 to 18.9 years completed a one-time anonymous survey retrospectively reporting back on ED and depressive symptomology before and during the pandemic, the impact of social media, and coping strategies. A reduced quality of life (QoL) due to confinement was observed in almost half of female adolescents. All groups reported a significant perceived increase of disordered eating, overeating, anxiety, and depressive symptoms and emotion-regulation problems. In AN patients, significantly higher percentual deterioration of disordered eating and anxiety and depressive symptoms was found. For controls, a younger age and higher susceptibility of the sociocultural body image significantly correlated with increased disordered eating. Large-scale media literacy interventions are recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Feeding Behavior , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies
7.
Nutrients ; 14(11)2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869724

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, eating disorders (ED) among individuals during emerging adulthood have become a crucial challenge to public health, taking into account the fact that the global prevalence of the ED risk in student-aged populations already stands at 10.4% and has been sharply increasing during the COVID-19 pandemic. In all, from 50% to 80% of all the ED cases go undetected or are not correctly diagnosed; moreover, these individuals do not receive specialized treatment. Therefore, early diagnosis detected via screening questionnaires for ED is highly recommended. This study aimed to identify the triggers for ED risk development in emerging-adulthood individuals and to reveal the factors significant not only for ED prevention but also for assessing individuals with subthreshold symptoms. This cross-sectional study provides the results for the ED symptom screening in 1716 Lithuanian higher-education students aged 21.2 ± 3.9, during emerging adulthood. According to the results of this study, 19.2% of students were at risk for ED. Potential risk factors such as sex (odds ratio (OR): 3.1, 95% CI: 1.9-4.9), body weight (self-reported body mass index) (adjusted (A) OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.7) and comorbidities such as smoking (AOR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.6-2.8), and perceived stress during the pandemic (AOR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1-1.8) are involved in anticipating the symptomatology of ED during emerging adulthood. Regular initial screenings with universally adopted questionnaires and further referral to a psychiatrist must be applied to promote both the diagnosis of early-onset symptomatology and the treatment of these ED in student-aged populations. Preventive programs for reducing the prevalence of overweight or obesity among students during emerging adulthood should focus on integration directions for the development of a positive body image.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Students
8.
Pediatr Ann ; 51(4): e150-e153, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789491

ABSTRACT

Eating disorders can have serious consequences for adolescent patients. Early detection and coordination of treatment can improve outcomes. The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has negatively affected mental health, and eating disorders are no exception. The reported increase in eating disorder behaviors and referrals for treatment, combined with the shortage of treatment options, has underscored the role of the outpatient pediatrician. Detection of eating disorders in the primary care setting starts with analyzing vitals and weight trends. If suspecting an eating disorder, one should complete a thorough history with pertinent review of systems, physical examination, and an initial laboratory evaluation. Upon confirming a diagnosis, it is important for a pediatrician to decide on the level of care needed. Given long wait times for treatment centers, utilization of local resources is helpful for coordinating a multidisciplinary approach. Increased funding for eating disorder treatment initiatives could help alleviate the current strain on our health care system. [Pediatr Ann. 2022;51(4):e150-e153.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Feeding Behavior , Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
10.
Am Psychol ; 77(1): 140-142, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768778

ABSTRACT

Eating disorders (EDs) are serious psychiatric disorders that affect 13%-18% of young men and women. EDs are associated with substantial psychiatric and medical morbidity and mortality, indicating a critical need for improved identification and treatment. Despite the relatively high prevalence and severity of EDs, they are often omitted from discussions of mental health. This comment is in response to Gruber et al. (2020), who wrote an important article on the challenges and opportunities facing clinical scientists in the time of COVID-19. Our response extends Gruber et al.'s article by noting additional challenges facing people with an ED during COVID-19 and recognizing opportunities for improved evidence-based assessment and treatment of this important population. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Psychopathology
12.
Compr Psychiatry ; 115: 152304, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734297

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is growing concern about how people with eating disorders are impacted by the widespread societal restructuring during the COVID-19 crisis. AIMS: We aimed to examine how factors relating to the impact of the pandemic associate with eating disorders and quantify this relationship while adjusting for concurrent and longitudinal parameters of risk. METHODS: We gathered demographic, behavioral and clinical data pre- and mid-pandemic as well as childhood trauma history from a longitudinal online survey of 489 adults (mean age 23.4 years) recruited from the Neuroscience in Psychiatry Network (NSPN). Using pre-pandemic (T1) and concurrent (T2) data we aimed to predict eating disorders at mid-pandemic (T2). We deployed hierarchical generalized logistic regression to ascertain the strength of longitudinal and concurrent associations. RESULTS: Pre-pandemic eating disorder scores strongly associated with concurrent eating disorder (z = 5.93). More conflict at home mid-pandemic (z = 2.03), pre- (lower sensation seeking z = -2.58) and mid-pandemic (higher lack of perseverance z = 2.33) impulsivity traits also associated with mid-pandemic eating disorder. CONCLUSION: Conflict at home mid-pandemic and specific aspects of impulsiveness significantly associated with concurrent eating disorder when adjusted for pre-pandemic eating disorder symptoms, baseline demographics, behavioral traits, history of traumatic experiences and concurrent psychopathology. These results provide insight into the struggles of those suffering with eating disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic and highlight the importance of impulsiveness traits and the immediate family environment in their experience of illness during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anorexia Nervosa , COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 48: 141-147, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664803

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with eating disorders (ED) are known to suffer from various psychological morbidities thus they are expected to be negatively impacted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the pooled prevalence of psychological comorbidities in ED patients. METHODS: Pubmed, Scopus, GoogleScholar, and medRxiv were searched using the keywords COVID19 and Eating Disorders and their related MeSH terms. The articles were included if they contained patients with diagnosed EDs and having evaluated their mental health disturbances during the COVID-19 pandemic. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the "assessing risk of bias in prevalence studies" tool. The heterogeneity was assessed using Cochrane Q and I2 heterogeneity statistics. RESULTS: A total of 13 articles have been included in this meta-analysis with a sample size of 3056. The pooled prevalence of ED patients who experienced worsening of ED symptoms was 57% (95%CI: 36%-76%), anxiety was 64% (95%CI: 39%-78%), and depression was 55% (95%CI: 12%-87%) during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis provides evidence supporting an increase in the pooled prevalence of mental health disorders among patients suffering from EDs during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Prevalence
18.
Int J Eat Disord ; 55(2): 155-160, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661607

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly disrupted people's daily life and contributed to adverse health and mental health outcomes. People with pre-existing mental health conditions are particularly likely to experience symptom exacerbation. Complementing the adverse impacts of the pandemic are eating disorder specific risk factors for worsening of eating disorder symptoms and/or impeding treatment progress and recovery. For this joint Virtual Issue, we selected 15 articles that have been published in two leading journals in the field of eating disorders (International Journal of Eating Disorders and Journal of Eating Disorders) to highlight studies that offer information about individuals' lived experience with an eating disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic. In these studies, most participants reported worsening of eating disorder symptoms which they attributed to challenges arising from changes in daily routines including eating and exercise related habits, increased stress, and diminished social contacts. These research findings reported a mixed picture about patients' perceptions of the ease of the transition to virtual delivery of treatment and the quality of care they received during the pandemic. Qualitative studies suggested strategies for supporting people with eating disorders during pandemic conditions, with some of these holding promise for improving care for individuals who experience an eating disorder.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Periodicals as Topic , Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(1)2022 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631300

ABSTRACT

Objective: Recent evidence suggests psychosocial stressors stemming from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) exposure and public health recommendations and policies have exacerbated eating disorder symptoms. Consequentially, eating disorder acuity has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently, it is still unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic may be impacting individuals receiving treatment for eating disorders at higher levels of care. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of COVID-19 on eating disorder symptoms and associated outcomes in a sample of individuals receiving eating disorder treatment compared to individuals receiving treatment in 2019.Methods: Blinded outcomes data from 272 adults who completed treatment at an eating disorder treatment center between April and October of 2019 (pre-COVID-19 group) and 2020 (COVID-19 group) were examined. Repeated measures analyses of variance with Bonferroni correction were used to examine differences in outcome variables and treatment response.Results: Fewer participants reported trauma in 2020, but symptoms were more severe when present. A significant interaction effect for treatment (eg, admission, discharge) and year (eg, pre-COVID-19, COVID-19) was found for eating disorder and trauma symptoms. Moreover, trauma symptom scores were higher in 2020 than in 2019. The interaction among year, trauma, and treatment was significant (F3,268 = 2.11, P = .027, η2 = 0.034), indicating that individuals with severe trauma in 2020 reported less eating disorder symptom score reduction.Conclusions: Results extend understanding of effects during the COVID-19 pandemic on treatment-seeking individuals with eating disorders. Clinical implications suggest that greater attention to trauma when screening eating disorder patients and selecting treatment approaches are needed, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adult , Comorbidity , Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613810

ABSTRACT

We hypothesized that women who are overweight, experiencing COVID-19-related stress, and with high body dissatisfaction would have significantly greater disordered eating than those of healthy weight, without stress, and with low body dissatisfaction. Participants (N = 1354 women; Mage= 31.89 years, SD = 11.14) filled in the Contour Drawing Rating Scale, the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire, the Eating Motivation Survey, the Mindful Eating Questionnaire, and a COVID-19-related stress measure and sociodemographic survey. The cluster analysis technique revealed four distinct clusters: (a) Cluster 1 (N = 314): healthy body weight, no COVID-related stress, and low body dissatisfaction (M = 1.19); (b) Cluster 2 (N = 131): overweight, no COVID-related stress, and high body dissatisfaction (M = 2.41); (c) Cluster 3 (N = 597): healthy body weight, COVID-related stress, and low body dissatisfaction (M = 1.27); (d) Cluster 4 (N = 312): overweight, COVID-related stress, and high body dissatisfaction (M = 2.84). Generally, our outcomes partially support our hypothesis, as higher levels of some types of disordered eating were observed in women who were overweight with COVID-related stress and high body dissatisfaction (Cluster 4) as compared with women with healthy body weight, no COVID-related stress, and with low levels of body dissatisfaction (Cluster 1). Our results indicate that both body weight status, as well as COVID-19-related stress and body dissatisfaction, may contribute to the intensity of disordered eating. During future epidemic-related quarantines, this may be an argument in favor of organizing support regarding emotional functioning, body image, and eating behaviors, particularly for the most vulnerable groups-including overweight and obese women.


Subject(s)
Body Dissatisfaction , COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Body Image , Cluster Analysis , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Overweight/epidemiology , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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