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2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 750682, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775935

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a conceptual framework and critical considerations for the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) in academic public health. Academic education for public health has undergone significant transformation over the last two decades as the demand for responsive and innovative public health pedagogy and training for preparing graduates to deploy an increasing array of skills has grown. The authors suggest that the role of schools, administrators, faculty, and educational staff in developing promising practices for teaching and learning in public health involves an articulated conceptual framework to guide the development and dissemination of scholarly, pedagogical innovations. Building on seminal philosophical foundations of SoTL, the authors conceptualize SoTL from the foundational belief that knowing and learning are communal tasks and that faculty are both scholars and learners in the practice of education. The paper advocates for SoTL as a form of engaged practice and scholarly inquiry that exists in contextually rich, diverse educational environments that abounds with uncertainty. SoTL is guided by an educational philosophy, values, and learning theories that envision educators critically examining themselves, their teaching practice, scholarly literature, and students' learning to improve their teaching, enhance learning, and promote further inquiry. The authors suggest that SoTL involves the search for multiple forms of evidence and fosters dialogues on multiple interpretations and perspectives of the most promising practices of teaching and learning. The authors advocate for the term promising practices as an outcome of SoTL that supports and nurtures ongoing scientific discovery and knowledge generation, instead of supporting the search for best-ness in teaching and learning endeavors. SoTL should occur across formal, informal, and nonformal education.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Educational Status , Humans , Learning , Public Health
3.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 38(4): e1207-e1212, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774458

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate both applicant and interviewer satisfaction with the virtual interviewing process for pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellowship in hopes to improve the fellowship interviewing process. It was proposed that fellowship programs and applicants would prefer virtual interviews over traditional interviews. METHODS: A survey developed in collaboration with UT Southwestern PEM fellowship leaders and national PEM leaders was sent to all PEM fellowship applicants and programs at the conclusion of the 2020 interview season and rank list submission. The applicant survey obtained information on ease of virtual interviews and whether applicants felt that they obtained adequate information from virtual interviews to make informed program selections. Program director surveys collected data on thoughts and feelings about virtual interviews and obstacles encountered during the recruitment season. Both surveys asked about costs for interviews and interview type preference. RESULTS: A response rate of 49% from applicants and 47% from programs was obtained. Virtual interview days were similar in the amount of time and staff hours used compared with traditional days. Applicants spent less on virtual interviews compared with those who underwent traditional interviews (average $725 vs $4312). Programs received more applications than the prior year and spent less money during the virtual cycle. The majority of the applicants (90%) were comfortable with the virtual interview platform, and most (66%) agreed that virtual interviews provided adequate information to determine program rank. Geography was the number 1 rank determining factor. Programs and applicants preferred a form of in-person interviews. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual interviews provide cost savings for both applicants and programs. Despite this, both parties prefer a form of in-person interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Pediatric Emergency Medicine , Child , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2054304, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751978

ABSTRACT

Due to Covid-19, fellowship programs could not conduct in-person interviews during the 2020-2021 interview cycle and were forced to implement virtual interviews. We conducted two nationwide surveys of residency and fellowship Program Directors (PDs) involved in the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) Subspecialty Fellowship match cycle to gain a better understanding of virtual interviews from each of their perspectives. 1) Fellowship PDs' confidence in using a virtual platform to holistically evaluate applicants during the 2020-2021 match cycle, 2) Residency PD's perception of virtual interviews and impact on their program's operations, and 3) to assess the desire of fellowship and residency PDs to continue virtual recruitment during forthcoming interview seasons. Two separate nationwide web-based surveys were administered to 1) Ob/Gyn fellowship PDs and 2) residency PDs through SurveyMonkey from July-September 2020 to assess the impact of virtual interviews form each parties' perspective. Surveys solicited demographic information, four-point Likert scale questions, and free response questions Of programs meeting inclusion criteria, 75/111 (67.6%) fellowship PDs and 67/117 (57.3%) residency PDs responded to their respective surveys. Most fellowship PDs believed that they could confidently assess applicants' professionalism (88%) during a virtual interview and (90.7%) felt confident in making a rank-order list. However, only 73.3% were just as confident in preparing a rank list after a virtual interview as they have been with in-person interviews. Most residency PDs (69.9%) believed that virtual interviews made it easier for their program to comply with duty hours, and 76.8% agreed that virtual interviews allowed their residents to accept more interviews than an in-person format. Most fellowship PDs found virtual interviews convenient. However, difficulty in observing social interaction and gauging applicant interest may be the biggest challenge moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education
6.
Surg Endosc ; 36(4): 2430-2435, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748485

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The European Association of Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) fellowship programme was established in 2014, allowing nine surgeons annually to obtain experience and skills in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) from specialist centres across the Europe and United States. It aligns with the strategic focus of EAES Education and Training Committee on enabling Learning Mobility opportunities. To assess the impact of the programme, a survey was conducted aiming to evaluate the experience and impact of the programme and receive feedback for improvements. METHODS: A survey using a 5-point Likert scale was used to evaluate clinical, education and research experience. The impact on acquisition of new technical skills, change in clinical practice and ongoing collaboration with the host institute was assessed. The fellows selected between 2014 and 2018 were included. Ratings were analysed in percentage; thematic analysis was applied to the free-text feedbacks using qualitative analysis. RESULTS: All the fellows had good access to observing in operating theatres and 70.6% were able to assist. 91.2% participated in educational activities and 23.5% were able to contribute through teaching. 44.1% participated in research activities and 41.2% became an author/co-author of a publication from the host. 97.1% of fellows stated that their operative competency had increased, 94.3% gained new surgical skills and 85.7% was able to introduce new techniques in their hospitals. 74.29% agreed that the clinical experience led to a change in their practices. The most commonly suggested improvements were setting realistic target in clinical and research areas, increasing fellowship duration, and maximising theatre assisting opportunities. Nevertheless, 100% of fellows would recommend the fellowship to their peers. CONCLUSION: EAES fellowship programme has shown a positive impact on acquiring and adopting new MIS techniques. To further refine the programme, an individualised approach should be adopted to set achievable learning objectives in clinical skills, education and research.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Surgeons , Clinical Competence , Endoscopy , Humans , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/education , United States
7.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 36(4): 1207-1208, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740502
9.
Mol Biol Cell ; 33(3): vo1, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709244

ABSTRACT

Despite substantial investment and effort by federal agencies and institutions to improve the diversity of the professoriate, progress is excruciatingly slow. One program that aims to enhance faculty diversity is the Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award (IRACDA) funded by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences. IRACDA supports the training of a diverse cohort of postdoctoral scholars who will seek academic research and teaching careers. The San Diego IRACDA program has trained 109 postdoctoral scholars since its inception in 2003; 59% are women and 63% are underrepresented (UR) Black/African-American, Latinx/Mexican-American, and Indigenous scientists. Sixty-four percent obtained tenure-track faculty positions, including a substantial 32% at research-intensive institutions. However, the COVID-19 pandemic crisis threatens to upend IRACDA efforts to improve faculty diversity, and academia is at risk of losing a generation of diverse, talented scholars. Here, a group of San Diego IRACDA postdoctoral scholars reflects on these issues and discusses recommendations to enhance the retention of UR scientists to avoid a "lost generation" of promising UR faculty scholars.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cultural Diversity , Education, Graduate , Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities/statistics & numerical data , California , Education, Graduate/economics , Faculty, Medical/economics , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , National Institute of General Medical Sciences (U.S.) , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Research Personnel/economics , Research Personnel/education , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Salaries and Fringe Benefits/statistics & numerical data , United States , Universities/economics , Women/education
11.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 18(4): e600-e609, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673957

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Hematology and oncology (HO) lags behind all medicine subspecialties in fellows under-represented in medicine (URM) despite a growing minority patient population. Websites have been effectively used in URM recruitment. We evaluated all US HO program websites to facilitate a more informed and URM-considerate recruitment. We also performed a stratified analysis on programs affiliated with National Cancer Institute (NCI) Designated Cancer Centers, National Comprehensive Cancer Center Network (NCCN) member institutions, and ranked as a top 50 cancer hospital by US News, given their stated commitment to outreach. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Websites of all 2019-2020 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited HO programs were assessed for 28 informational and three diversity categories. Websites with > 70% of categories were comprehensive. Affiliation with NCI, NCCN, and US News was noted. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-six websites were analyzed: 20% were comprehensive and 22% had any diversity information. Inclusion of diversity content and being comprehensive were significantly associated (P = .001). NCI, NCCN, and US News ranking were significantly associated with inclusion of more information in univariate analyses (P < .001, P = .008, and P < .001, respectively). Multivariate analyses showed that US News ranking was significantly associated with more information (P = .005). Diversity-related univariate and multivariate analyses showed a significant association with US News ranking (P = .006 and P = .029, respectively). CONCLUSION: Most HO fellowship websites are not comprehensive and lack diversity content. Given COVID-19 travel restrictions limit in-person interviews, digital program presence remains an important opportunity. HO programs should offer comprehensive and inclusive websites to better inform applicants, including URM. This may increase institutional diversity and potentially improve URM representation in the HO workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Medical Oncology
13.
Ann Fam Med ; 20(1): 32-34, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648752

ABSTRACT

This bibliometric analysis seeks to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted submission rates to Annals of Family Medicine by gender. Women represented 46.3% of all manuscript submissions included in our study (n = 1,964/4,238), spanning from January 1, 2015 to July 15, 2020. The overall volume of submissions increased during COVID-19 in comparison to pre-pandemic months; however, this increase was not evenly distributed among men and women (122% increase vs 101% increase, respectively). In the early months of the pandemic, 244 submissions were authored by men (58.5%), and 173 submissions were authored by women (41.5%). The gap in women's submission rates is troubling, as it suggests they may be at greater risk of falling behind male colleagues during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Authorship , Family Practice , Fellowships and Scholarships , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
18.
Chest ; 160(4): 1187-1189, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591110
19.
Acta Gastroenterol Belg ; 84(4): 627-635, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593052

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to unprecedented disruptions in fellowship training programs worldwide. In gastroenterology, the strain in healthcare service provision and the emphasis on preventing viral transmission has adversely impacted hands-on training opportunities, with trainees facing the constant pressure to meet training requirements under the continuous threat of viral transmission. Emerging evidence highlight the scale of the problem, specifically with regard to endoscopy competence due to cancellation of elective endoscopic procedures, provision of inpatient and outpatient consultative care as well as academic education and the mental well-being of trainees. As such, it has been necessary for trainees, trainers and training programs collectively to adapt to these challenges and incorporate novel and adaptive solutions to circumvent these training barriers. This review aims to summarise data on the global impact of COVID-19 on gastroenterology training and the practical interventions that could be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastroenterology , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(4): 693-696, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538714

ABSTRACT

Increasing diverse author representation within medical librarianship scholarship among BIPOC information professionals is an important endeavor that requires closer examination. This commentary looks to examine the ways in which the profession can support Latinx librarians and library workers in fully participating within the scholarly pipeline by exploring our unique and authentic voices, structural barriers, hesitation and fears, Whiteness in the profession and knowledge production, bias in the peer review process, lack of resources and support, and finally, a call to action.


Subject(s)
Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Library Science , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans
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