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1.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 711-715, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496885

ABSTRACT

CoronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) had a huge impact on human health and economy. However, to this date, the effects of the pandemic on the training of young cardiologists are only partially known. To assess the consequences of the pandemic on the education of the cardiologists in training, we performed a 23-item national survey that has been delivered to 1443 Italian cardiologists in training, registered in the database of the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC). Six hundred and thirty-three cardiologists in training participated in the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents affirmed that the training programme has been somewhat stopped or greatly jeopardized by the pandemic. For 61% of the fellows in training (FITs), the pandemic had a negative effect on their education. Moreover, 59% of the respondents believe that they would not be able to fill the gap gained during that period over the rest of their training. A negative impact on the psycho-physical well being has been reported by 86% of the FITs. The COVID-19 pandemic had an unparalleled impact on the education, formation and mental state of the cardiologists in training. Regulatory agencies, universities and politicians should make a great effort in the organization and reorganization of the teaching programs of the cardiologists of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology/education , Communicable Disease Control , Education , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Cardiologists/psychology , Cardiologists/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Fertil Steril ; 116(3): 872-881, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233425

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the experience and perceptions of reproductive endocrinology and infertility fellowship applicants and program directors (PDs) regarding the current and future use of web-based interviews (WBIs). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nationwide cohort. PATIENT(S): Reproductive endocrinology and infertility fellowship applicants and PDs participating in the 2020 application cycle. INTERVENTION(S): Anonymous survey sent to applicants and PDs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Descriptive study evaluating the experience and satisfaction of applicants and PDs with WBIs. RESULT(S): Forty-six percent of applicants and eligible PDs responded to our survey. Most applicants and PDs responded that WBIs were adequate for conveying a sense of a program's strengths, faculty, diversity, clinical training, and research opportunities, but less than half responded that WBIs were adequate in providing a sense of the program's clinical site and facilities. After WBIs, both applicants (73%) and PDs (86%) were able to rank with confidence. The cost of WBIs was significantly lower for both applicants (median: $100) and programs (median: $100) than the costs previously reported for in-person interviews. The applicants interviewed at more programs than they would have if the interviews were on-site, and Zoom was the highest rated platform used. Most applicants and PDs responded that WBIs were an adequate substitute, and that they should continue after the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Furthermore, most of the PDs were planning to continue to use WBIs in some capacity. CONCLUSION(S): Both applicants and PDs had favorable experiences with and perceptions of WBIs, and most endorse the continued use of this interview modality. The findings of this study can help guide and optimize future WBI practices.


Subject(s)
Endocrinology/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , Physicians/psychology , Reproductive Medicine/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endocrinology/education , Endocrinology/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Female , Humans , Infertility/therapy , Internet , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interpersonal Relations , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Job Application , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perception , Personal Satisfaction , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Reproductive Medicine/education , Reproductive Medicine/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 31(3): 268-274, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused state-wide shutdowns of elective surgical activities in March and April of 2020 forcing graduate medical education program directors and their trainees in the United States to quickly adapt to new rules and circumstances. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the current pandemic on pediatric anesthesiology fellow education and wellness nationally in order to guide creation of optimal support systems for fellows during the ongoing pandemic. METHODS: In July 2020, an electronically distributed survey was sent to all United States-based pediatric anesthesiology fellowship program directors who were asked to distribute the survey to all current/graduating fellows. RESULTS: A total of 75 out of 184 pediatric anesthesiology fellows (41%) responded to the survey. Major domains identified include reduction of clinical time, financial impact, mental health/wellness effects, and concerns about the overall quality of the fellowship educational experience. Respondents indicated that the pandemic has led to personal quarantine (and/or illness) leave time (21.3%), changes in finances (42.7%) and career opportunities (37.3%), decreased clinical education/experience (28%), and a dissatisfaction with the modified didactic experience (22.7%). In addition, a majority of respondents (97.3%) experienced increased stressors during this pandemic, including worry for family members (80%), stress due to changes in certifying examinations (76%), and fear of contracting COVID-19 from a patient (72%). CONCLUSION: While the results of this survey are only one snapshot in time during an evolving pandemic, these results highlight important domains where program directors and other departmental leaders might focus limited resources to maximize the educational experiences and overall wellness for pediatric anesthesiology fellows.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Health Status , Mental Health , Pediatrics/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Health Surveys/methods , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 42(4): 314-321, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990835

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the use of telehealth in developmental behavioral pediatric (DBP) fellowship-affiliated practices during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic. METHODS: An electronic survey was disseminated to all DBP fellowship-associated practice locations to determine the use of telehealth in DBP care provision, before and since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed responses using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A total of 35 of 42 eligible practice sites responded (83% response rate). Most sites (51.4%) reported using telehealth less than once per month before the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the onset of COVID-19, 100% of programs reported conducting video-based telehealth visits multiple days per week. Most sites reported conducting evaluations and follow-up visits for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral concerns, developmental delay, genetic disorders, and learning disability. Most sites were able to continue medication management by telehealth (>88%), offer interpreter services for families with limited English proficiency participating in telehealth visits (>90%), and incorporate trainees and interdisciplinary team members in telehealth visits (>90%). Greater variability was observed in sites' ability to collect telehealth practice evaluation measures. CONCLUSION: Most sites are providing evaluations and ongoing care for DBP conditions through telehealth. The rapid adoption of telehealth can have ramifications for the way that DBP care is delivered in the future; therefore, it is imperative to understand current practice patterns and variations to determine the best use of telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Pediatrics/methods , Telemedicine , Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders/diagnosis , Child , Child Development , Child Development Disorders, Pervasive/diagnosis , Developmental Disabilities/diagnosis , Humans , Pediatrics/education , Telemedicine/methods
7.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S367-S380, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unexpected COVID-19 crisis has disrupted medical education and patient care in unprecedented ways. Despite the challenges, the health-care system and patients have been both creative and resilient in finding robust "temporary" solutions to these challenges. It is not clear if some of these COVID-era transitional steps will be preserved in the future of medical education and telemedicine. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this commentary is to address the sometimes substantial changes in medical education, continuing medical education (CME) activities, residency and fellowship programs, specialty society meetings, and telemedicine, and to consider the value of some of these profound shifts to "business as usual" in the health-care sector. METHODS: This is a commentary is based on the limited available literature, online information, and the front-line experiences of the authors. RESULTS: COVID-19 has clearly changed residency and fellowship programs by limiting the amount of hands-on time physicians could spend with patients. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medicine Education has endorsed certain policy changes to promote greater flexibility in programs but still rigorously upholds specific standards. Technological interventions such as telemedicine visits with patients, virtual meetings with colleagues, and online interviews have been introduced, and many trainees are "techno-omnivores" who are comfortable using a variety of technology platforms and techniques. Webinars and e-learning are gaining traction now, and their use, practicality, and cost-effectiveness may make them important in the post-COVID era. CME activities have migrated increasingly to virtual events and online programs, a trend that may also continue due to its practicality and cost-effectiveness. While many medical meetings of specialty societies have been postponed or cancelled altogether, technology allows for virtual meetings that may offer versatility and time-saving opportunities for busy clinicians. It may be that future medical meetings embrace a hybrid approach of blending digital with face-to-face experience. Telemedicine was already in place prior to the COVID-19 crisis but barriers are rapidly coming down to its widespread use and patients seem to embrace this, even as health-care systems navigate the complicated issues of cybersecurity and patient privacy. Regulatory guidance may be needed to develop safe, secure, and patient-friendly telehealth applications. Telemedicine has affected the prescribing of controlled substances in which online counseling, informed consent, and follow-up must be done in a virtual setting. For example, pill counts can be done in a video call and patients can still get questions answered about their pain therapy, although it is likely that after the crisis, prescribing controlled substances may revert to face-to-face visits. LIMITATIONS: The health-care system finds itself in a very fluid situation at the time this was written and changes are still occurring and being assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the technological changes imposed so abruptly on the health-care system by the COVID-19 pandemic may be positive and it may be beneficial that some of these transitions be preserved or modified as we move forward. Clinicians must be objective in assessing these changes and retaining those changes that clearly improve health-care education and patient care as we enter the COVID era.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
8.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 29(7): 271-277, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976459

ABSTRACT

On May 7, 2020, the Coalition for Physician Accountability's released "Medical Students in the Class of 2021: Moving Across Institutions for Post Graduate Training," which comprises official recommendations on keeping programs and medical students safe during the upcoming match cycle with the challenges posed by COVID-19. In these recommendations, away rotations are discouraged, and all programs are compelled to commit to virtual interviews. Unlike employers and applicants in other industries, orthopaedic residency/fellowship programs and candidates seeking those positions have not routinely conducted virtual interviews. Without in-person interviews, applicants may perceive a limited ability to demonstrate their qualifications, judge program culture, and gauge ultimate program compatibility. Likewise, programs may perceive the inability to evaluate a candidate in real time, physically show program strengths, and ultimately judge applicant compatibility. Careful preparation and execution of a virtual interview can overcome these perceived limitations, whereas benefits, such as decreased cost for both programs and applicants, can make virtual interviews appealing. The purpose of this review was to help define a virtual interview, illustrate the benefits, and offer tips to both programs and applicants on how to prepare and perform optimally on an interview day.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic , Orthopedics/education , Personnel Selection , COVID-19/psychology , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/methods , User-Computer Interface
9.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 9(1): 1-6.e1, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-899065

ABSTRACT

As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic, medical trainees have faced unique challenges and uncertainties. To capture the experiences of allergy and immunology fellows throughout the United States and Canada during this time, a 17-item electronic questionnaire was distributed to 380 fellow-in-training (FIT) members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology enrolled in US and Canadian allergy/immunology fellowship programs. Voluntary and anonymous responses were collected from April 15 to May 15, 2020. In addition to summary statistics, categorical data were compared using χ2 tests (Fisher's exact). Responses were obtained from FITs across all years of training and primary specialties (Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Medicine-Pediatrics) with a response rate of 32.6% (124 of 380). Reassignment to COVID-19 clinical responsibilities was reported by 12% (15 of 124) of FITs, with the largest proportion in the US northeast region. A majority of FITs used telehealth (95%) and virtual learning (82%) during the pandemic. Overall, 21% (25 of 120) of FITs expressed concern about potentially lacking clinical experience for independently practicing allergy and immunology. However, FITs using telehealth reported lower concern compared with those who did not (18.4% [21 of 114] vs 66.7% [4 of 6]; P = .01). The survey shows that allergy and immunology trainee experiences have varied considerably since the COVID-19 outbreak. Notably, the adoption of telehealth and virtual learning was commonly reported, and optimization of these virtual experiences will be helpful. Even outside of pandemics, training on the use of telemedicine may be a sound strategy in preparation for future health care delivery and unexpected events.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology/education , Allergy and Immunology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States
10.
Gynecol Oncol ; 160(1): 271-278, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867195

ABSTRACT

In approximately ten months' time, the novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has infected over 34 million people and caused over one million deaths worldwide. The impact of this virus on our health, relationships, and careers is difficult to overstate. As the economic realities for academic medical centers come into focus, we must recommit to our core missions of patient care, education, and research. Fellowship education programs in gynecologic oncology have quickly adapted to the "new normal" of social distancing using video conferencing platforms to continue clinical and didactic teaching. United in a time of crisis, we have embraced systemic change by developing and delivering collaborative educational content, overcoming the limitations imposed by institutional silos. Additional innovations are needed in order to overcome the losses in program surgical volume and research opportunities. With the end of the viral pandemic nowhere in sight, program directors can rethink how education is best delivered and potentially overhaul aspects of fellowship curriculum and content. Similarly, restrictions on travel and the need for social distancing has transformed the 2020 fellowship interview season from an in-person to a virtual experience. During this time of unprecedented and rapid change, program directors should be particularly mindful of the needs and health of their trainees and consider tailoring their educational experiences accordingly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/standards , Gynecology/education , Internship and Residency/standards , Medical Oncology/education , United States
13.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(10): 2581-2585, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652795

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the EACTA fellowship program. The authors present three points that in their view are important and give cause for concern because they could make it difficult or impossible to achieve the original goals of the fellowship program. Corresponding points are discussed and possible solutions are presented. An implementation in the fellowship curriculum is planned.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Cardiac Procedures/trends , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Program Evaluation/trends , Anesthesia, Cardiac Procedures/methods , Anesthesiologists/education , Anesthesiologists/trends , COVID-19 , Europe/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Humans , Program Evaluation/methods , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 16(11): 1929-1932, 2020 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707095

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has forced program directors of sleep medicine fellowship programs, and other clinical training programs, to immediately transition longstanding face-to-face clinical and didactic instruction to virtual formats. The effects of this sudden transition to distance learning affect multiple aspects of training, from recruitment to patient care, scholarly activity, and well-being. Clinical educators must also understand how to consider and maintain equity while implementing distance learning strategies. METHODS: Resources were collected from multiple sites that are openly accessible to sleep medicine educators. These resources are presented within their topic domains to provide guidance on how to effectively implement distance learning strategies into a clinical training program. RESULTS: Links to helpful resources are provided for each of the following topics: virtual clinical care, didactic delivery in a virtual clinical learning environment, generating scholarship via distance learning, well-being in the setting of distance learning, virtual interviews, and equity in a virtual clinical learning environment. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical training programs, including sleep medicine fellowships, can utilize virtual and distance learning methodologies to deliver, and even enhance, currently existing curricula. The widespread adoption of distance learning strategies opens new opportunities for educational innovation and collaboration among training programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Sleep Medicine Specialty/education , Humans , Pandemics
15.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(19): e860-e864, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-681913

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate resident, fellow, and attending perspectives on the use of e-learning as part of orthopaedic surgery education. METHODS: A survey was created evaluating (1) overall attitudes toward e-learning, (2) multi-institutional e-learning/e-conferences, (3) national/regional e-conferences, and (4) future directions with e-learning. The survey was distributed to all the orthopaedic surgery residency program directors in the United States, and they were asked to circulate the survey to their program's faculty and trainees. RESULTS: A total of 268 responses were collected, including 100 attendings and 168 trainees. Overall satisfaction with e-learning compared with in-person learning was higher among trainees than attending faculty, with 51.4% of trainees favoring e-learning, as opposed to 32.2% of attendings (P = 0.006). Both groups felt they were more likely to pay attention with in-person learning (P = 0.89). During the COVID-19 pandemic, 85.7% of residents have used e-learning platforms to join a conference in their specialty of interest while off-service. Most attendings and trainees felt e-learning should play a supplemental role in standard residency/fellowship education, with a low number of respondents feeling that it should not be used (86.6% versus 84%, and 2.1% versus 0.6%, respectively, P = 0.28). CONCLUSION: E-learning has been an important modality to continue academic pursuits during the disruption in usual education and training schedules during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most trainees and attendings surveyed felt that e-learning should play a supplementary role in resident and fellow education moving forward. Although e-learning does provide an opportunity to hold multi-institutional conferences and makes participation in meetings logistically easier, it cannot fully replicate the dynamic interactions and benefits of in-person learning.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedics/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Orthopedics/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
Dig Dis Sci ; 65(8): 2161-2163, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591929

ABSTRACT

Many GI training programs have needed to adjust to the serious disruption to the training and education of fellows worldwide due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A silent problem that has arisen within programs is the issue of burnout among their trainees. Burnout is common among gastroenterologists, especially in fellows (Keswani et al. in Gastroenterology 147(1):11-14, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2014.05.023 , Am J Gastroenterol 106(10):1734-1740, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.148 ), with negative consequences to patient care and the safety of the trainees if not effectively dealt with. In this article, the author describes several additional factors potentially contributing to the intensifying burnout of the fellows in their home institution during this pandemic. Moreover, he describes specific practical interventions that the hospital and program have taken in order to address these factors.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education , Gastroenterology/education , Internship and Residency , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Psychological/etiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Education/ethics , Education/organization & administration , Education/trends , Ethics, Institutional , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Gastroenterologists/psychology , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 27(Suppl 3): 911-915, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291326

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has overlapped with the scheduled interview periods of over 20 surgical subspecialty fellowships, including the Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) fellowships in the National Resident Matching Program and the Society of Surgical Oncology's Breast Surgical Oncology fellowships. We outline the successful implementation of and processes behind a virtual interview day for CGSO fellowship recruitment after the start of the pandemic. METHODS: The virtual CGSO fellowship interview process at the University of Chicago Medicine and NorthShore University Health System was outlined and implemented. Separate voluntary, anonymous online secure feedback surveys were email distributed to interview applicants and faculty interviewers after the interview day concluded. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 interview applicants (80.0%) and 12 of 13 faculty interviewers (92.3%) completed their respective feedback surveys. Seventy-five percent (12/16) of applicants and all faculty respondents (12/12) stated the interview process was 'very seamless' or 'seamless'. Applicants and faculty highlighted decreased cost, time savings, and increased efficiency as some of the benefits to virtual interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Current circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic require fellowship programs to adapt and conduct virtual interviews. Our report describes the successful implementation of a virtual interview process. This report describes the technical steps and pitfalls of organizing such an interview and provides insights into the experience of the interviewer and interviewee.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Specialties, Surgical , Surgical Oncology/education , User-Computer Interface , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chicago , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialties, Surgical/classification , Specialties, Surgical/education
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