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1.
Mol Biol Cell ; 33(3): vo1, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709244

ABSTRACT

Despite substantial investment and effort by federal agencies and institutions to improve the diversity of the professoriate, progress is excruciatingly slow. One program that aims to enhance faculty diversity is the Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award (IRACDA) funded by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences. IRACDA supports the training of a diverse cohort of postdoctoral scholars who will seek academic research and teaching careers. The San Diego IRACDA program has trained 109 postdoctoral scholars since its inception in 2003; 59% are women and 63% are underrepresented (UR) Black/African-American, Latinx/Mexican-American, and Indigenous scientists. Sixty-four percent obtained tenure-track faculty positions, including a substantial 32% at research-intensive institutions. However, the COVID-19 pandemic crisis threatens to upend IRACDA efforts to improve faculty diversity, and academia is at risk of losing a generation of diverse, talented scholars. Here, a group of San Diego IRACDA postdoctoral scholars reflects on these issues and discusses recommendations to enhance the retention of UR scientists to avoid a "lost generation" of promising UR faculty scholars.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cultural Diversity , Education, Graduate , Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities/statistics & numerical data , California , Education, Graduate/economics , Faculty, Medical/economics , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , National Institute of General Medical Sciences (U.S.) , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Research Personnel/economics , Research Personnel/education , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Salaries and Fringe Benefits/statistics & numerical data , United States , Universities/economics , Women/education
2.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 711-715, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496885

ABSTRACT

CoronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) had a huge impact on human health and economy. However, to this date, the effects of the pandemic on the training of young cardiologists are only partially known. To assess the consequences of the pandemic on the education of the cardiologists in training, we performed a 23-item national survey that has been delivered to 1443 Italian cardiologists in training, registered in the database of the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC). Six hundred and thirty-three cardiologists in training participated in the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents affirmed that the training programme has been somewhat stopped or greatly jeopardized by the pandemic. For 61% of the fellows in training (FITs), the pandemic had a negative effect on their education. Moreover, 59% of the respondents believe that they would not be able to fill the gap gained during that period over the rest of their training. A negative impact on the psycho-physical well being has been reported by 86% of the FITs. The COVID-19 pandemic had an unparalleled impact on the education, formation and mental state of the cardiologists in training. Regulatory agencies, universities and politicians should make a great effort in the organization and reorganization of the teaching programs of the cardiologists of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology/education , Communicable Disease Control , Education , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Cardiologists/psychology , Cardiologists/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1722-1731, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354309

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical trainees (residents and fellows) working at Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) in New York City (NYC), the initial epicenter of the United States pandemic. METHOD: The authors administered a survey to 991 trainees in frontline specialties working at MSH in NYC between April and May 2020. The instrument assessed symptoms of major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, COVID-19-related posttraumatic stress disorder, and burnout. Psychiatric screens were aggregated into 1 composite measure, and meeting criteria on any of the 3 scales was considered a positive screen for psychiatric symptoms. The survey also assessed COVID-19-related exposures, worries, coping strategies, and desired interventions. Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with psychiatric symptoms and burnout. RESULTS: Of the 560 respondents (56.6% response rate), 29.7% screened positive for psychiatric symptoms and 35.8% screened positive for burnout. History of a mental illness, COVID-19-related duties and personal/career worries, and coping by substance use were associated with increased likelihood of screening positive for psychiatric symptoms. Positive emotion-focused coping and feeling valued by supervisors were associated with decreased likelihood. Internal medicine and surgical specialties, a history of mental illness, increased duty hours, duty-related worries, personal/career worries, coping via self-blame and venting, and coping via substance use were associated with higher odds of burnout. Feeling valued by supervisors was associated with decreased burnout odds. The most common crisis-related needs included access to personal protective equipment, food provisions, and financial support. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological distress and burnout affected approximately one-third of trainees sampled during the height of the pandemic in NYC. As the pandemic surged beyond NYC, these findings suggest that interventions should include addressing basic needs, promoting leadership affirmation, moderating duty hours, supporting trainees financially, and enhancing mental health support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , New York City/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(7): 989-994, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333014

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The early COVID-19 pandemic rapidly transformed healthcare and medical education. We sought to evaluate the professional and personal impact of the pandemic on 2019-2020 Breast Surgical Oncology (BSO) fellows in Society of Surgical Oncology approved programs to capture the experience and direct future changes. METHODS: From July 15, 2020 to August 4, 2020 a survey was administered to the American Society of Breast Surgeons' fellow members. The survey assessed the impact of the pandemic on clinical experience, education/research opportunities, personal health/well-being, and future career. Responses were collected and aggregated to quantify the collective experience of respondents. RESULTS: Twenty-eight of fifty-seven (54%) eligible fellows responded. Twenty-one (75%) indicated the clinical experience changed. Twenty-seven (96%) reported less time spent caring for ambulatory breast patients and sixteen (57%) reported the same/more time spent in the operating room. Fourteen (50%) stated their future job was impacted and eight (29%) delayed general surgery board examinations. Stress was increased in 26 (93%). Personal health was unaffected in 20 (71%), and 3 (10%) quarantined for COVID-19 exposure/infection. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic altered the clinical experience of BSO fellows; however, the operative experience was generally unaffected. The creation of frameworks and support mechanisms to mitigate potential challenges for fellows and fellowship programs in the ongoing pandemic and other times of national crisis should be considered.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surgeons/education , Surgical Oncology/education , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , United States/epidemiology
5.
Dig Dis Sci ; 66(10): 3307-3311, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted numerous facets of healthcare workers' lives. There have also been significant changes in Gastroenterology (GI) fellowship training as a result of the challenges presented by the pandemic. AIMS: We conducted a national survey of Gastroenterology fellows to evaluate fellows' perceptions, changes in clinical duties, and education during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was sent to Gastroenterology (GI) fellows in the USA. Information regarding redeployment, fellow restriction in endoscopy, outpatient clinics and inpatient consults, impact on educational activities, and available wellness resources was obtained. Fellows' level of agreement with adjustments to clinical duties was also assessed. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-seven Gastroenterology fellows responded, and 29.4% were redeployed to non-GI services during the pandemic. COVID-19 impacted all aspects of GI fellowship training in the USA (endoscopy, outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, educational activities). Fellows' level of agreement in changes to various aspects of fellowship varied. 72.5% of respondents reported that their programs provided them with increased wellness resources to cope with the additional stress during the pandemic. For respondents with children, 17.6% reported no support with childcare. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted GI fellowship training in the USA in multiple domains, including gastrointestinal endoscopy, inpatient consults, outpatient clinics, and educational conferences. Our study highlights the importance of considering and incorporating fellows' viewpoints, as changes are made in response to the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastroenterologists/statistics & numerical data , Gastroenterology/education , Adult , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gastroenterology/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; 72(3): 564-570, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736313

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this national survey was to assess the overall impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the provision of interventional radiology (IR) services in Canada. METHODS: An anonymous electronic survey was distributed via national and regional radiology societies, exploring (1) center information and staffing, (2) acute and on-call IR services, (3) elective IR services, (4) IR clinics, (5) multidisciplinary rounds, (6) IR training, (7) personal protection equipment (PPE), and departmental logistics. RESULTS: Individual responses were received from 142 interventional radiologists across Canada (estimated 70% response rate). Nearly half of the participants (49.3%) reported an overall decrease in demand for acute IR services; on-call services were maintained at centers that routinely provide these services (99%). The majority of respondents (73.2%) were performing inpatient IR procedures at the bedside where possible. Most participants (88%) reported an overall decrease in elective IR services. Interventional radiology clinics and multidisciplinary rounds were predominately transitioned to virtual platforms. The vast majority of participants (93.7%) reported their center had disseminated an IR specific PPE policy; 73% reported a decrease in case volume for trainees by at least 25% and a proportion of trainees will either have a delay in starting their careers as IR attendings (24%) or fellowship training (35%). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on IR services in Canada, particularly for elective cases. Many centers have utilized virtual platforms to provide multidisciplinary meetings, IR clinics, and training. Guidelines should be followed to ensure patient and staff safety while resuming IR services.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Community/statistics & numerical data , Radiography, Interventional/statistics & numerical data , Radiology, Interventional/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , After-Hours Care/statistics & numerical data , Canada , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Humans , Organizational Policy , Patient Care Team , Personal Protective Equipment , Radiology, Interventional/education , Radiology, Interventional/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching Rounds/statistics & numerical data
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