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1.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 609-618, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330740

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has created challenges across medicine, including in medical education, with deeply rooted impacts in the dermatology residency experience. Its effects are both acute and chronic, including: shifts to virtual education and conferences, skewed clinical experiences, negatively impacted wellness, and uncertainty in the future. As educators and mentors, it is important to recognize and address these issues so that we may remain transparent, adaptable, and engaged as we continue to build a better tomorrow for our resident trainees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/education , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Patient Care Management/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Social Perception
2.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 38(5): 1163-1169, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163090

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess perceived deficiencies of reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellow education due to changes in care secondary to COVID-19. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study performed in an academic setting. A survey was generated and administered to REI fellows and attendings practicing in programs across the United States. Descriptive statistics were used to quantify results regarding clinical volume, academic responsibilities, clinical safety, and fellowship education. RESULTS: The survey response rate was 23%. Eighty-four percent of respondents self-identified as fellows, and 16% identified as program directors or other REI academic instructors. Overall, the survey responses confirmed that the COVID-19 pandemic tremendously affected clinical volume, with 91% of participants reporting their clinical volume decreased by at least half. Although 67% of attendings believed that the changes related to COVID-19 have or will have significantly affected the clinical skills of fellows, 66% of fellows did not believe that their clinical training had been significantly impacted. Sixty-seven percent of fellows and 78% of attendings do not believe that changes related to COVID-19 will affect the ability of fellows to practice independently. CONCLUSION: Even though most attendings surveyed believed that the changes related to COVID-19 would affect the clinical skills of fellows, the cessation of clinical and research activities was short-lived, likely tempering the overall effect on clinical training. Overall, most respondents did not believe that the pandemic significantly affected fellow education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/trends , Pandemics , COVID-19/virology , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
4.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(1): 8-11, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066713

ABSTRACT

Fellows and junior faculty conducting aging research have encountered substantial new challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. They report that they have been uncertain how and whether to modify existing research studies, have faced difficulties with job searches, and have struggled to balance competing pressures including greater clinical obligations and increased responsibilities at home. Many have also wondered if they should shift gears and make COVID-19 the focus of their research. We asked a group of accomplished scientists and mentors to grapple with these concerns and to share their thoughts with readers of this journal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty, Medical/trends , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Geriatrics/trends , Medical Staff, Hospital/trends , Research Personnel/trends , Career Mobility , Faculty, Medical/education , Geriatrics/education , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital/education , Research Personnel/education , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S367-S380, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unexpected COVID-19 crisis has disrupted medical education and patient care in unprecedented ways. Despite the challenges, the health-care system and patients have been both creative and resilient in finding robust "temporary" solutions to these challenges. It is not clear if some of these COVID-era transitional steps will be preserved in the future of medical education and telemedicine. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this commentary is to address the sometimes substantial changes in medical education, continuing medical education (CME) activities, residency and fellowship programs, specialty society meetings, and telemedicine, and to consider the value of some of these profound shifts to "business as usual" in the health-care sector. METHODS: This is a commentary is based on the limited available literature, online information, and the front-line experiences of the authors. RESULTS: COVID-19 has clearly changed residency and fellowship programs by limiting the amount of hands-on time physicians could spend with patients. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medicine Education has endorsed certain policy changes to promote greater flexibility in programs but still rigorously upholds specific standards. Technological interventions such as telemedicine visits with patients, virtual meetings with colleagues, and online interviews have been introduced, and many trainees are "techno-omnivores" who are comfortable using a variety of technology platforms and techniques. Webinars and e-learning are gaining traction now, and their use, practicality, and cost-effectiveness may make them important in the post-COVID era. CME activities have migrated increasingly to virtual events and online programs, a trend that may also continue due to its practicality and cost-effectiveness. While many medical meetings of specialty societies have been postponed or cancelled altogether, technology allows for virtual meetings that may offer versatility and time-saving opportunities for busy clinicians. It may be that future medical meetings embrace a hybrid approach of blending digital with face-to-face experience. Telemedicine was already in place prior to the COVID-19 crisis but barriers are rapidly coming down to its widespread use and patients seem to embrace this, even as health-care systems navigate the complicated issues of cybersecurity and patient privacy. Regulatory guidance may be needed to develop safe, secure, and patient-friendly telehealth applications. Telemedicine has affected the prescribing of controlled substances in which online counseling, informed consent, and follow-up must be done in a virtual setting. For example, pill counts can be done in a video call and patients can still get questions answered about their pain therapy, although it is likely that after the crisis, prescribing controlled substances may revert to face-to-face visits. LIMITATIONS: The health-care system finds itself in a very fluid situation at the time this was written and changes are still occurring and being assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the technological changes imposed so abruptly on the health-care system by the COVID-19 pandemic may be positive and it may be beneficial that some of these transitions be preserved or modified as we move forward. Clinicians must be objective in assessing these changes and retaining those changes that clearly improve health-care education and patient care as we enter the COVID era.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
6.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 82-86, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an international crisis placing tremendous strain on medical systems around the world. Like other specialties, neuroanesthesiology has been adversely affected and training programs have had to quickly adapt to the constantly changing environment. METHODS: An email-based survey was used to evaluate the effects of the pandemic on clinical workflow, clinical training, education, and trainee well-being. The impact of the International Council on Perioperative Neuroscience Training (ICPNT) accreditation was also assessed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 14 program directors (88% response rate) in 10 countries and from 36 fellows in these programs. Clinical training was adversely affected because of the cancellation of elective neurosurgery and other changes in case workflow, the introduction of modified airway and other protocols, and redeployment of trainees to other sites. To address educational demands, most programs utilized online platforms to organize clinical discussions, journal clubs, and provide safety training modules. Several initiatives were introduced to support trainee well-being during the pandemic. Feelings of isolation and despair among trainees varied from 2 to 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10). Fellows all reported concerns that their clinical training had been adversely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of decreased exposure to elective subspecialty cases and limited opportunities to complete workplace-based assessments and training portfolio requirements. Cancellation of examination preparation courses and delayed examinations were cited as common sources of stress. Programs accredited by the ICPNT reported that international networking and collaboration was beneficial to reduce feelings of isolation during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Neuroanesthesia fellowship training program directors introduced innovative ways to maintain clinical training, educational activity and trainee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/trends , Anesthesiology/education , Anesthesiology/trends , COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Clinical Competence , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/trends
8.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(10): 2581-2585, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652795

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the EACTA fellowship program. The authors present three points that in their view are important and give cause for concern because they could make it difficult or impossible to achieve the original goals of the fellowship program. Corresponding points are discussed and possible solutions are presented. An implementation in the fellowship curriculum is planned.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Cardiac Procedures/trends , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Program Evaluation/trends , Anesthesia, Cardiac Procedures/methods , Anesthesiologists/education , Anesthesiologists/trends , COVID-19 , Europe/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Humans , Program Evaluation/methods , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(19): e860-e864, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-681913

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate resident, fellow, and attending perspectives on the use of e-learning as part of orthopaedic surgery education. METHODS: A survey was created evaluating (1) overall attitudes toward e-learning, (2) multi-institutional e-learning/e-conferences, (3) national/regional e-conferences, and (4) future directions with e-learning. The survey was distributed to all the orthopaedic surgery residency program directors in the United States, and they were asked to circulate the survey to their program's faculty and trainees. RESULTS: A total of 268 responses were collected, including 100 attendings and 168 trainees. Overall satisfaction with e-learning compared with in-person learning was higher among trainees than attending faculty, with 51.4% of trainees favoring e-learning, as opposed to 32.2% of attendings (P = 0.006). Both groups felt they were more likely to pay attention with in-person learning (P = 0.89). During the COVID-19 pandemic, 85.7% of residents have used e-learning platforms to join a conference in their specialty of interest while off-service. Most attendings and trainees felt e-learning should play a supplemental role in standard residency/fellowship education, with a low number of respondents feeling that it should not be used (86.6% versus 84%, and 2.1% versus 0.6%, respectively, P = 0.28). CONCLUSION: E-learning has been an important modality to continue academic pursuits during the disruption in usual education and training schedules during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most trainees and attendings surveyed felt that e-learning should play a supplementary role in resident and fellow education moving forward. Although e-learning does provide an opportunity to hold multi-institutional conferences and makes participation in meetings logistically easier, it cannot fully replicate the dynamic interactions and benefits of in-person learning.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedics/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Orthopedics/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
12.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 27(Suppl 3): 911-915, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291326

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has overlapped with the scheduled interview periods of over 20 surgical subspecialty fellowships, including the Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) fellowships in the National Resident Matching Program and the Society of Surgical Oncology's Breast Surgical Oncology fellowships. We outline the successful implementation of and processes behind a virtual interview day for CGSO fellowship recruitment after the start of the pandemic. METHODS: The virtual CGSO fellowship interview process at the University of Chicago Medicine and NorthShore University Health System was outlined and implemented. Separate voluntary, anonymous online secure feedback surveys were email distributed to interview applicants and faculty interviewers after the interview day concluded. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 interview applicants (80.0%) and 12 of 13 faculty interviewers (92.3%) completed their respective feedback surveys. Seventy-five percent (12/16) of applicants and all faculty respondents (12/12) stated the interview process was 'very seamless' or 'seamless'. Applicants and faculty highlighted decreased cost, time savings, and increased efficiency as some of the benefits to virtual interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Current circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic require fellowship programs to adapt and conduct virtual interviews. Our report describes the successful implementation of a virtual interview process. This report describes the technical steps and pitfalls of organizing such an interview and provides insights into the experience of the interviewer and interviewee.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Specialties, Surgical , Surgical Oncology/education , User-Computer Interface , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chicago , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialties, Surgical/classification , Specialties, Surgical/education
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