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1.
researchsquare; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-3982502.v1

ABSTRACT

The Surveillance of rare adverse events following vaccination, particularly related to COVID-19 vaccines, requires thorough examination. This paper investigates vaccine-associated myocarditis and/or pericarditis (VAMPS), presenting insights into clinical manifestations, management, and outcomes. Conducted at the Prince Sultan Cardiac Center in Saudi Arabia from March 2021 to May 2022, this retrospective case series comprises 20 patients with an average age of 27.9 ± 14.0 years, predominantly males (70%). Pfizer-BioNTech, AstraZeneca, and Moderna vaccines were administered in 74%, 21%, and 5% of cases, respectively, with 53% receiving the second dose, 26% the booster, and 21% the initial dose. Common symptoms included shortness of breath (60%), chest pain (50%), palpitations (40%), premature ventricular contractions (35%), and fever (25%). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging revealed preserved left ventricular function (80%), subepicardial and/or mid-wall late gadolinium enhancement (65%), and lateral (39%), anterolateral (15%), inferolateral (15%), and anteroseptal (15%) segments affected. Myocarditis, pericarditis, and myopericarditis were diagnosed in 40%, 20%, and 40% of cases, respectively. C-reactive protein was elevated in two-thirds of patients. Recovery was achieved with anti-inflammatory medications, primarily colchicine (72%), aspirin(39%), and ibuprofen (33%). While no fatalities occurred, 30% experienced severe complications, and 15% had minor complications. In conclusion, VAMPS exhibits distinct characteristics and may lead to serious complications. Cardiologists should consider VAMPS in the differential diagnosis for symptomatic patients recently vaccinated against COVID-19, emphasizing the importance of ongoing surveillance and understanding of rare adverse events.


Subject(s)
Myocarditis , Chest Pain , Fever , Ventricular Premature Complexes , Pericarditis , COVID-19 , Dyspnea
2.
medrxiv; 2024.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2024.02.13.24301472

ABSTRACT

During early 2021, Peru had the highest COVID-19-associated per-capita mortality rate globally. Socioeconomic inequality and insufficiently prepared healthcare and surveillance systems likely contributed to high mortality, potentially coupled with early SARS-CoV-2 introduction. We tested 1,441 individuals with fever sampled during August 2019-May 2021 in Lima, Peru, for SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. Serologic testing included a chemiluminescence immunoassay and confirmatory surrogate virus neutralization testing. Early positive samples (n=24) from January-March 2020 were further tested using a plaque-reduction neutralization and avidity tests based on SARS-CoV-2 spike and nucleoprotein antigens. None of the early samples were PRNT-confirmed, in contrast to 81.8% (18/22) of a subsample from April 2020 onwards (Fischer-exact test, p<0.0001). SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection rate was 0.9% in mid-April 2020 (1/104; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1-5.8%), suggesting onset of viral circulation in early-mid March 2020, consistent with the first molecular detection of SARS-CoV-2 in Peru on March 6th. Mean avidity increase of 62-77% to 81-94% from all PRNT-confirmed samples during early 2020, were consistent with onset of SARS-CoV-2 circulation during late February/March 2020. Early circulation of SARS-CoV-2 was confirmed in a Susceptible, Exposed, Infected and Recovered mathematical model that projected an effective reproduction number >1, during February-March 2020. Robust serologic testing thus confirmed that early SARS-CoV-2 introduction contributed to high COVID-19 mortality in Peru. Emphasizing the role of diagnostic confirmation, our study highlights the importance of early detection and accurate testing in managing infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Fever , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases
3.
preprints.org; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-PREPRINTS.ORG | ID: ppzbmed-10.20944.preprints202402.0421.v1

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against the SARS-CoV2 virus has shown great promise in managing the spread and severity of Covid-19. While these vaccines were able to provide a favourable response in controlling the SARS-CoV2 infection, its use came with accompanying side effects. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of the different Covid-19 vaccine subtypes and discover the side effects associated with each vaccine elsewhere but specially in Trinidad and Tobago. For this systematic review, the keywords “Pfizer-BioNTech OR Moderna OR Oxford-AstraZeneca OR Janssen OR Sinopharm OR Novavax AND Covid-19 vaccine efficacy” and “Covid-19 vaccines AND Trinidad and Tobago” were researched under PubMed, MEDLINE and other internet sources through which other notable journals, and documents were discovered and searched similarly as outlined previously. In doing so, 65 relevant articles were included as part of this review. Of the studies examined, overall the vaccine with the greatest VE was found to be Pfizer-BioNTech (95%), followed by Moderna (94.1%), Novavax (89.7%), AstraZeneca (70.4%), Sinopharm (67%) and finally Janssen (66.9%). The use of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna was most efficacious in response to the different Covid-19 variants. Some side effects were common for all vaccine types however adverse effects were more commonly seen with vaccination by mRNA vaccines, Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-Astrazeneca. Researchers targeted individuals aged 18 and above residing in various geographical areas of TT, specifically focusing on those who had not received the COVID-19 vaccine and expressed hesitancy towards it. Convenience sampling was used to select the study participants, and formal in-depth virtual interviews were conducted on a one-to-one basis, employing a semi-structured questionnaire to guide the discussions. The interviews were meticulously recorded and transcribed, following the principles of reflexive thematic analysis, to distill key insights from the participants' responses. The study's findings, derived from the perspectives of 25 participants, illuminated a complex tapestry of reasons underlying vaccine hesitancy in Trinidad and Tobago. Notably, prominent themes emerged, including fear, doubts regarding vaccine efficacy, a perceived inadequacy of information, a sense of susceptibility to the virus, deep-seated mistrust, alternative herbal remedies, and religious reservations. Interestingly, the motivations expressed by these vaccine-hesitant individuals for potentially receiving the vaccine in the future were rooted in notions of necessity, an increased sense of susceptibility to the virus, a desire to reach a certain health benchmark, and a need for assurance regarding the vaccine's safety and effectiveness. This comprehensive exploration of vaccine hesitancy in TT provides valuable insights for public health officials and policymakers in crafting targeted strategies to address this critical issue within the local context. Conclusion: The findings of this study determined that vaccination against the SARS-CoV2 virus provided beneficial outcomes against infection, Covid-19 related hospitalizations, ICU admissions and mortality. While vaccination was deemed highly appropriate in managing the spread of the SARS-CoV2 virus and enhancing the outcomes in infected persons, the effectiveness of the different vaccine platforms indicated that certain vaccine platforms are preferential to others in different populations. In terms of vaccine efficacy, nucleic acid vaccines such as Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna showed the greatest effectiveness while inactivated whole virus vaccines such as Sinopharm and viral vectors like Janssen had the least effectiveness. The side effects, joint/muscle soreness, pain at the injection site, shoulder pain, headaches, fever, chills, weakness, epistaxis, renal and certain cardiovascular events were common for all vaccine types. Adverse effects were more frequent and severe with the mRNA vaccines by Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-Astrazeneca than inactivated whole virus vaccines. The data collected in this research can be very useful to help individuals make a decision on which vaccine would be appropriate for them. More long-term studies are needed to better gauge the scope of side effects for each vaccine type.


Subject(s)
Fever , Pain , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19 , Headache , Muscle Weakness
4.
researchsquare; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-3933825.v1

ABSTRACT

Background Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTI) pose a serious threat to older adults but may be underdiagnosed due to atypical presentations. Here we assess LRTI symptom profiles and syndromic (symptom-based) case ascertainment in older (≥65y) as compared to younger adults (<65y). Methods We included adults (≥18y) with confirmed LRTI admitted to two acute care Trusts in Bristol, UK from 1st August 2020- 31st July 2022.  Logistic regression was used to assess whether age ≥65y reduced the probability of meeting syndromic LRTI case definitions, using patients’ symptoms at admission. We also calculated relative symptom frequencies (log-odds ratios) and evaluated how symptoms were clustered across different age groups. Results Of 17,620 clinically confirmed LRTI cases, 8,487 (48.1%) had symptoms meeting the case definition. Compared to those not meeting the definition these cases were younger, had less severe illness and were less likely to have received a SARS-CoV-2 vaccination or to have active SARS-CoV-2 infection. Prevalence of dementia/cognitive impairment and levels of comorbidity were lower in this group. After controlling for sex, dementia and comorbidities, age ≥65y significantly reduced the probability of meeting the case definition (aOR=0.67, 95% CI:0.63-0.71). Cases aged ≥65y were less likely to present with fever and LRTI-specific symptoms (e.g., pleurisy, sputum) than younger cases, and those aged ≥85y were characterised by lack of cough but frequent confusion and falls. Conclusions LRTI symptom profiles changed considerably with age in this hospitalised cohort. Standard screening protocols may fail to detect older and frailer cases of LRTI based on their symptoms.


Subject(s)
Fever , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19 , Respiratory Tract Infections , Confusion , Pleurisy , Dementia , Cognition Disorders
5.
researchsquare; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-3929510.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: Talaromycosis(TSM) commonly occurs in immunodeficient or immunosuppressed individuals, but it can also occur in healthy populations. The present case reports the COVID-19 together with human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) and TSM. Case Presentation: This report describes a 26-year-old male who presented with a fever and cough for 20 days. He was diagnosed with COVID-19 and viral pneumonia through a real-time RT-PCR assay and chest CT scan. However, his symptoms failed to improve significantly despite being treated with high-flow oxygen, levofloxacin antibiotic, and dexamethasone for 5 days. The presence of white streaks in his oral cavity, combined with the patient's history of multiple antibiotics, raised the possibility of a fungal infection. The results of the oral pharyngeal swabs indicated that he was infected with T. marnefii, which led to testing for HIV and eventually confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: This case demonstrates the importance of being alert to concurrent fungal infections when infecting with COVID-19 and using multiple antimicrobial agents. Additionally, when infecting with T. marnefii, it is crucial to focus on the presence of HIV infection.


Subject(s)
Fever , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes , Cough , Mycoses , Infections
6.
researchsquare; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-3931620.v1

ABSTRACT

Objective This retrospective cohort study aimed to assess the clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and short-term prognosis of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with concurrent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia.Methods KTRs with COVID-19 pneumonia who were admitted to our hospital from December 28, 2022, to March 28, 2023 were included in the study, and their clinical symptoms, response to antiviral medications, and short-term prognosis were analyzed.Results A total of 64 KTRs with initial diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia were included in this study. The primary symptoms were fever, cough, and myalgia, with an incidence of 79.7%, 89.1%, and 46.9%, respectively. The administration of antiviral drugs (paxlovid or molnupiravir) within 1–5 days and for over 5 days demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in viral shedding time compared to the group without antiviral medication (P = 0.002). Both the paxlovid and molnupiravir treatment groups exhibited a significantly shorter duration of viral shedding time in comparison to the group without antiviral drugs (P = 0.002). After 6 months of recovery, there was no significantly negative impact on transplant kidney function (P = 0.294).Conclusion Fever, cough, and myalgia remain common initial symptoms of concurrent COVID-19 pneumonia in KTRs. The earlier use of antiviral drugs (the paxlovid or molnupiravir) is associated with better therapeutic outcomes. severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had limited impact on short-term renal function of the KTRs with concurrent moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Fever , Pneumonia , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19 , Myalgia , Cough
7.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170667145.51993937.v1

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is highly transmissible among people,and the critical cases are still tough to treat, even leading to death. METHODS We retrospectively collected the clinical data of all the critical patients admitted to the Three Gorges Hospital(Chongqing, China) from Jan 20, 2020 to Feb 16, 2020 , whom were divided into improved group and worsen group. At last, we analyzed and compared the differences in laboratory indexes and length of hospital stay of the two groups. RESULT 46 cases were enrolled in the study. Comorbid conditions were present in 25 cases (54.3%). Most cases had symptoms, such as fever, cough, sputum, shortness of breath and dyspnea. The worsen group had a higher APACHE II score of 14(range from 5 to 23) than improved group(5, range from 3 to 7)(p<0.05). 32(69.6%) cases had low level lymphocyte counts (<1.0×109/L), including 8(66.7%) worsen group patients and 24(70.6%) improved group patients. The worsen group was 14.3(range from 8.21 to 18) with the ratio of neutrophil counts to lymphocyte counts, higher than that in improved group((7.33, range from 4.71 to 14.35)(p<0.05). There were faster respiratory frequencies in worsen group(23, range from 20 to 24.75) (p<0.05). And the worsen group had a lower OI(156.5, range from 74.25 to 233) than the other group(206, range from 177.5 to 242.75)(p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Initial lower lymphocytes and higher APACHE II scores might be relative to the poor prognosis. And most of severe or critical patients had underlying diseases.


Subject(s)
Fever , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19 , Cough , Dyspnea
8.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170667235.57161637.v1

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a public health problem and may have co-infection with other pathogens such as influenza virus.This study aims to assess the co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 with influenza among COVID-19 cases.The all relevant studies were collected from international databases. For improving the quality of the present literature, the all studies were evaluated by two reviewers in order to confirm all of the studies have inclusion criteria. Finally, all articles with sufficient quality scores were included in meta-analysis. Assessment of heterogeneity among the studies of primary studies was performed using the statistic chi‐squared test (Cochran’s Q) and I2 index. In this results, random or fixed effect model were used for determination of heterogeneity test. All statistical analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (CMA), V.2 software.This meta- analysis included 9 primary studies investigating the co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 with influenza among COVID-19 cases. Pooled prevalence (95% confidence interval) of co-infection is shown that the prevalence of influenza A is higher than influenza B. 2.3(0.5-9.3) vs 0.1 (0.4-3.3). Using the fixed effect model the frequency of fever was (80.6% [95% CI 76.1–84.40, p < 0.153]) and it is shown that fever is the most prevalent symptom in patients.Patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 also infected with influenza virus. Thus, the current research provides a better understanding about the control and treatment of co-infection with SARS-CoV-2 and the influenza virus.


Subject(s)
Coinfection , Fever , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections
9.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170667564.43671703.v1

ABSTRACT

Brugada syndrome is an inherited arrythmia syndrome characterized by a right bundle branch block and dynamic ST-segment changes in precordial leads V1-V3. In patients with Brugada syndrome, fever is a known trigger that may induce arrythmia. For patients with Brugada syndrome who contract COVID-19, the inflammatory response poses risk of causing ventricular arrythmias. The following case discusses management of a patient with Brugada syndrome presenting with electrical storm after contracting COVID-19. Treatment should be focused on aggressive antipyretic management along with concomitant pharmacological therapy.


Subject(s)
Bundle-Branch Block , Fever , COVID-19 , Brugada Syndrome , Arrhythmias, Cardiac
10.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170667851.18572230.v1

ABSTRACT

Objective: The severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the resulting COVID-19 pandemic pose significant challenges in terms of diagnosis and recurrent infections. Literature data suggest that age, gender and BMI factors are associated with immune response. The first aim of the study was to analyze the change in antibody titer at 15-day intervals until 60 days post symptom onset (PSO) The second aim was to analyze relationship between antibody titer and symptom grade, gender, age, BMI, therapeutic drugs, vitamin supplements, and herbal therapies. Materials and methods: Blood samples were collected from 43 patients (5 mild, 21 moderate, 17 severe diseases), 18 women (41.9 %), and 25 men (58.1 %), on 15, 30, 45, and 60 days PSO after COVID-19 infection. The serum antibody titers were determined by measuring the COVID-19 IgG antibodies by ELISA. Associations between the duration of symptoms, demographic and clinical parameters, medications and vitamins used, and herbal therapies were evaluated by interviewing the participants. Results: Within the first 15 days of illness, 81.4% of the patients were positive. From day 45 PSO, seropositivity was 89.5%. The anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody titers were statistically higher in men than women at all-time (p<0.01). Antibody titer was higher in older participants compared to younger participants (p<0.02). Plaquenil or Favipiravir use did not effect antibody response (p>0.05). Men had higher fever (p=0.006), shortness of breath (p=0.004), and chest pain (p=0.03) than women. Conclusion: We found powerful antibody response by sixty days PSO, as well as higher antibody response and severity of symptoms in men gender. Data also showed that SARS-CoV-2 antibodies are higher in individuals with older age, whereas BMI, coexisting chronic disease, and drug used had no effect on antibody titers.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease , Fever , Chest Pain , Respiratory Insufficiency , COVID-19 , Dyspnea
11.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170668075.52028975.v1

ABSTRACT

In this study, we describe SARS-CoV-2 infection dynamics in one cat (case 1-Chester) and three dogs (case 2-Trasto, case 3-Bella and case 4-Bull) from households with confirmed human cases of COVID-19 living in the Madrid Community (Spain) at the time of expansion (December 2020 through June 2021) of the alpha variant of SARS-CoV-2 (lineage B.1.1.7). A thorough physical exam and nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, and rectal swabs were collected for real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) SARS-CoV-2 testing on day 0 and in successive samplings on days 7, 14, 21 and 47 during monitoring. Blood was also drawn to determine complete blood counts, biochemical profiles, and serology of the detect the IgG response against SARS-CoV-2. On day 0, the cat case 1 presented with dyspnoea and fever associated with a mild bronchoalveolar pattern. The dog cases 2, 3 and 4 were healthy, but case 2 presented with coughing, dyspnoea and weakness, and case 4 exhibited coughing and bilateral nasal discharge three and six days before the clinical exam. Case 3 (from the same household as case 2) remained asymptomatic. SARS-CoV-2 infection was detected in all cat and dog cases. The cat and the dog case 2 exhibited the lowest cycle threshold (Ct) (Ct < 30) when they presented or had recently presented clinical signs. Viral detection failed in successive samplings. Specific IgG antibodies were detected in the cat case 1 and dog cases 3 and 4, whereas dog case 2 seroconverted 21 days after SARS-CoV-2 detection. SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing was carried out, and genomes were compared to the SARS-CoV-2 Genome Reference Sequence. All strains were unambiguously classified as belonging to the B.1.1.7 lineage.


Subject(s)
Fever , COVID-19 , Muscle Weakness
12.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170668232.24096042.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic and the accompanying new generation vaccines have entered our lives with many unknown effects. Method and result: This is a case report of myopericarditis diagnosed with fever and chest pain 3 days after the 2nd dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine in an 18-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by cardiac MRI(CMR), but we presented that this diagnosis and follow-up could be made accurately with strain echocardiography(SE). Conclusion: It would be beneficial for the cardiologists who perform the primary follow-up of these patients to know that it is possible with SE to support the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients, even if CMR is not accesible.


Subject(s)
Fever , COVID-19 , Chest Pain
13.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170668169.98510112.v1

ABSTRACT

Rationale, aims and objectives: The coronavirus infection 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the emergency department (ED) management. Its viral transmission necessitates the use of isolation rooms and personal protective equipment for treating suspected patients, such as those with fever. This delays the time until the first encounter with the patients, thereby increasing the length of stay (LOS) in the ED. We aimed to compare delays in the ED LOS and clinical processes between the COVID-19 period and pre-COVID-19 period. Moreover, we intended to evaluate if the aforementioned delay affected patient outcomes. Methods: We conducted a single-center, retrospective study in Korea. Patients with fever were compared between the “COVID-19 period” from March 2020 to August 2020 and the “pre-COVID-19 period” from March 2019 to September 2019. We compared the overall ED LOS and individual time variable, including initial diagnostic tests (laboratory tests, radiography), specific diagnostic test (computed tomography), and treatment processes (antibiotics). A logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify the association between hospital admission and patient data. Results: We enrolled 931 and 749 patients during pre- and COVID-19 periods, respectively. Patients with fever remained in the ED for a longer duration during the COVID-19 period (pre-COVID-19:207.7±102.7 min vs. during COVID-19: 223.5±119.4 min, p=0.004). The total time for performing laboratory tests and radiography displayed significant differences between the two periods, particularly from the time of patient arrival in the ED to the time of issuing the order. The time until antibiotic administration was delayed in the COVID-19 period (pre-COVID-19:195.8±103.3 min vs. during COVID-19: 216.9±108.4 min, p=0.003). The logistic regression analysis for hospital admission identified ED LOS as an independent factor in both periods. Conclusion: The delay until encountering patients with fever resulted in longer ED LOS during the COVID-19 period; however, it possibly did not increase the hospital admission rates.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Fever , COVID-19
14.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170668729.93772766.v1

ABSTRACT

Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, which has had a negative impact worldwide. We aimed to contribute to the medical literature by sharing the knowledge and experience of pediatric patients who were diagnosed as having COVID-19 in a one-year period. Method: Patients aged 1 month to 18 years who were diagnosed as having COVID-19 in our clinic, between March 2020 and April 2020, from when COVID-19 was declared as a pandemic, were included in the study. Results: Four hundred sixty-seven children were included in the study. There were 34 (7.3%) patients under one year of age, 111 (23.8%) between 1-5 years, 98 (30.4%) between 5-10 years, 142 (30.4%) between 11-15 years, and 82 (17.6%) age over 15 years. Fever (88.2%), vomiting (32.4%), and diarrhea (29.4%) in patients aged under 1 year, sore throat (36.6%) in patients aged 11-15 years, and dysgeusia (11%), anosmia (14.6%), headache (18.3%), malaise (40.8%), myalgia (28%), and dyspnea (17.1%) in those aged over 15 years of age were found significantly more common compared with the other age groups. Thirty-five (7.5%) patients were asymptomatic, 365 (78.1%) had mild disease, 35 (7.5%) were moderate, 27 (5.8%) were severe, and five (1.07%) were critical. Leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ferritin, and C-reactive protein values were significantly higher in hospitalized patients. Four patients died during the study period (0.8%, 4/494). Conclusion: Although COVID-19 has an asymptomatic and mild course in children, it should be kept in mind that it may have a severe course.


Subject(s)
Diarrhea , Fever , Dyspnea , Vomiting , Child Nutrition Disorders , Headache , COVID-19 , Myalgia , Dysgeusia , Olfaction Disorders
15.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170669465.57409750.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of the coronavirus disease in late 2019 (COVID-19) has become one of the greatest health problems of the 21st century. Many aspects of this viral disease are still hidden. The current study is conducted to investigate COVID-19’s clinical manifestation, mortality factors, and their association with each other in the COVID-19 pandemic in Razavi-Khorasan province, Iran. Methods & Materials: This retrospective epidemiological population-based study was conducted from January 21, 2020, to March 20, 2021. The data including demographic characteristics and clinical presentations of the patients were extracted from the Medical Care Monitoring System (MCMC), disease management portal in the deputy of health and Hospital Information System (HIS). Results: A total of 80499 patients were admitted to all hospitals of Khorasan-Razavi University of Medical Sciences with laboratory/clinical COVID-19 confirmed disease, between January 2020 and March 2021. The male-to-female ratio was 1.10:1 and the mean age of our COVID-19 individuals was 55.67 ± 23.27. The most frequently reported presenting symptoms at admission were respiratory distress (58.2%), fever (36.7%), and cough (34.9%), and alternation in smell/taste (0.9%) was the less frequent. Being male, aging older than 60 years and having comorbidities were significantly associated with higher mortality rates. Conclusion: Due to the genetic mutations in the virus and the emergence of the new variants of the virus, clinical presentations, and mortality rates of the COVID-19 have been shifted through three reviewed waves. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of the new variants of the virus on individuals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Cross Infection , Fever , COVID-19
16.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170670123.33290410.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: To analyze the epidemic characteristics of the human rhinovirus (HRV) outbreaks in Guangzhou, China, in 2020. Method Descriptive epidemiological methods were used to analysis the HRV related outbreaks of Guangzhou, 2020. Results 17 outbreaks were reported in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic in Guangzhou, a total of 465 patients (290 males and 175 females) were enrolled, with a median age of 10. 223(47.96%) had been tested for HRV, 89 (39.91%) of which were positive. 344/465 (73.98%) had fever, 138/465 (29.68%) had runny nose, 139/465 (29.89%) had sore throat, 86/465 (18.49%) had cough, 41/465 (8.82%) had headache, 37/465 (7.96%) had sneeze. Patients at age of 13 to 15 had the highest rate of sore throat and runny nose, patients at the age of 11 to 12 had the highest rate of sneeze, and patients at age of 12 to 14 had the highest rate of positive rate. Patients tested positive had a higher rate of fever (2=11.271, P=0.001), cough (2=6.987, P=0.008), runny nose (2=7.980, P=0.005) and sneeze (2=4.676, P=0.031). Conclusion The HRV was restored during the fighting the COVID-19 Pandemic. The conventional COVID-19 control measures were not effective enough in preventing rhinovirus. More appropriate control measures should be used to control HRV.


Subject(s)
Bites, Human , Headache , Fever , COVID-19
17.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170670120.00402153.v1

ABSTRACT

we here report the clinical case of a serious adverse reaction to booster dose COVID-19 vaccination in a 40-year-old woman, who soon ,developed severe headache, high fever, and musculoskeletal pains, with very important elevation of D-dimer levels and clear reduction of White Blood Count.


Subject(s)
Headache , COVID-19 , Fever , Musculoskeletal Pain
18.
authorea preprints; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.170670105.50623012.v1

ABSTRACT

Rationale, aims and objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe the symptoms and clusters characteristics of COVID-19 patients in Taiwan. Method: The Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) from Taiwan CDC daily press release publications were extracted for patient demographic information (age, gender, case type and cluster) and the symptoms exhibited by the patients before diagnosis were collected. Results: A total of 1030 COVID-19 cases were reported in Taiwan up until the end of March 2021, of which 1009 patients had symptoms available. Of available patient data, 633 patients (62.74%) were symptomatic and 376 patients (37.26%) were asymptomatic, as classified in our study based on the published list of potential symptoms of COVID-19 by WHO. The most prevalent symptoms of our patients were coughing (29.33%), fever (26.56%) and nasal symptoms (20.22%). Our regression analysis found when the first detected patient of the cluster had a subjective sensation of feeling feverish, the number of infected cases in the cluster increased by 4.59 cases. Similarly, patients who experienced a slightly elevated body temperature or fever were associated with an increase of 2.37 and 0.35 cases in each cluster, respectively. Furthermore, increasing one new COVID-19 test per thousand population reduces 7.22 cases per cluster. Conclusions: The majority of reported cases in Taiwan were symptomatic. Symptoms which had the greatest number of patients overall were cough, fever, and nasal symptoms. It is our hope to help physicians to better diagnose current Taiwan COVID-19 patients, while aiding the government in stopping the spread of new cases.


Subject(s)
Fever , COVID-19
19.
researchsquare; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-3911163.v1

ABSTRACT

Background and aim: Convalescent plasma (CP) was early and successfully used in management of covid-19 infection. This report aimed to document our experience with use of CP in two critically-ill covid-19 patients.Main findings: Patients presented with fever, dry cough and difficulty of breathing with reduced oxygen saturation, massive radiological lung involvement and deteriorated Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) Score. Use of two sessions of CP resulted in marked improvement of radiological and/or pulmonary findings. Both patients died of septic shock or thromboembolic events.Conclusions Use of CP may be associated with radiological and clinical improvement in critically-ill patients. However, it’s not related to better survival if used in late stages of the disease.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Fever , Thromboembolism , Shock, Septic , COVID-19 , Cough
20.
preprints.org; 2024.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-PREPRINTS.ORG | ID: ppzbmed-10.20944.preprints202401.1971.v1

ABSTRACT

Advances in biological sciences have been applied in medicine, agriculture and industry with great benefit. Some recent trends in society, governance structures and communications, however, appear to be hampering the use of new scientific findings for controlling infectious diseases. These limitations are illustrated with examples related to (i) the adaptation of fresh water mosquito vectors of major arboviral diseases to salinity in coastal areas with consequences for disease transmission, (ii) understanding the implications of reduced dengue transmission during the COVID-19 lockdown for dengue control, (iii) causes underlying the rapid spread of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi in South Asia and Africa, (iv) the application of serodiagnostic techniques for Lyme disease and tick-borne relapsing fever caused by tick-borne bacteria of the genus Borrelia, and (v) COVID-19 prevention.


Subject(s)
Fever , Lyme Disease , Tick-Borne Diseases , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Malaria
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