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1.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 1, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Quantitative evaluation of radiographic images has been developed and suggested for the diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, there are limited opportunities to use these image-based diagnostic indices in clinical practice. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the utility of a novel visually-based classification of pulmonary findings from computed tomography (CT) images of COVID-19 patients with the following three patterns defined: peripheral, multifocal, and diffuse findings of pneumonia. We also evaluated the prognostic value of this classification to predict the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: This was a single-center retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between January 1st and September 30th, 2020, who presented with suspicious findings on CT lung images at admission (n = 69). We compared the association between the three predefined patterns (peripheral, multifocal, and diffuse), admission to the intensive care unit, tracheal intubation, and death. We tested quantitative CT analysis as an outcome predictor for COVID-19. Quantitative CT analysis was performed using a semi-automated method (Thoracic Volume Computer-Assisted Reading software, GE Health care, United States). Lungs were divided by Hounsfield unit intervals. Compromised lung (%CL) volume was the sum of poorly and non-aerated volumes (- 500, 100 HU). We collected patient clinical data, including demographic and clinical variables at the time of admission. RESULTS: Patients with a diffuse pattern were intubated more frequently and for a longer duration than patients with a peripheral or multifocal pattern. The following clinical variables were significantly different between the diffuse pattern and peripheral and multifocal groups: body temperature (p = 0.04), lymphocyte count (p = 0.01), neutrophil count (p = 0.02), c-reactive protein (p < 0.01), lactate dehydrogenase (p < 0.01), Krebs von den Lungen-6 antigen (p < 0.01), D-dimer (p < 0.01), and steroid (p = 0.01) and favipiravir (p = 0.03) administration. CONCLUSIONS: Our simple visual assessment of CT images can predict the severity of illness, a resulting decrease in respiratory function, and the need for supplemental respiratory ventilation among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Aged , Amides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Body Temperature , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Mucin-1/blood , Neutrophils , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Steroids/therapeutic use
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261529, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Risk factors for the development of severe COVID-19 disease and death have been widely reported across several studies. Knowledge about the determinants of severe disease and mortality in the Indian context can guide early clinical management. METHODS: We conducted a hospital-based case control study across nine sites in India to identify the determinants of severe and critical COVID-19 disease. FINDINGS: We identified age above 60 years, duration before admission >5 days, chronic kidney disease, leucocytosis, prothrombin time > 14 sec, serum ferritin >250 ng/mL, d-dimer >0.5 ng/mL, pro-calcitonin >0.15 µg/L, fibrin degradation products >5 µg/mL, C-reactive protein >5 mg/L, lactate dehydrogenase >150 U/L, interleukin-6 >25 pg/mL, NLR ≥3, and deranged liver function, renal function and serum electrolytes as significant factors associated with severe COVID-19 disease. INTERPRETATION: We have identified a set of parameters that can help in characterising severe COVID-19 cases in India. These parameters are part of routinely available investigations within Indian hospital settings, both public and private. Study findings have the potential to inform clinical management protocols and identify patients at high risk of severe outcomes at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Hospitals , Humans , India/epidemiology , Interleukin-6/blood , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin/blood , Risk Factors , Young Adult
3.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 32(1): 37-41, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599461

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy and cut-off values of C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum ferritin, and D-dimer for predicting mortality of COVID-19 infection. STUDY DESIGN: Observational study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Department of Medicine, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore from January to May 2021. METHODOLOGY: Serum CRP, LDH, ferritin, and D-dimer were measured in patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 infection at admission. Patients were followed for in-hospital disease outcome. ROC curve was used to determine area under curve (AUC) and cut-off values of biomarkers, followed by multi-variate analysis by logistic regression. RESULTS: In 386 patients, male to female ratio was 1.47/1 (230/156); and mean age was 54.03 ± 16.2 years. Disease was fatal in 135 (35%) patients. AUC for mortality was 0.730 for LDH, 0.737 for CRP, 0.747 for ferritin and 0.758 for D-dimer. Mortality was higher with LDH ≥400 U/ml, Odds Ratio (OR) 5.37 (95% CI 3.01-9.57: p = 0.001), CRP ≥30 ng/L, OR 4.30 (95% CI 2.11-8.74: p = <0.001), serum ferritin ≥200 ng/ml, OR 4.13 (95% CI 1.05-16.2: p = 0.02), and D-dimer ≥400 ng/ml, OR 2.72 (95% CI 1.06-7.01: p = 0.03) with 2 log likelihood of 131.54 for predicting disease outcome with 71.7% accuracy in multi-variate analysis. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum CRP, LDH, ferritin and D-dimer are associated with higher mortality in patients of COVID-19 infection. Serum CRP ≥30ng/ml, LDH ≥400 U/L, ferritin ≥200 ng/ml and D-dimer ≥400 ng/ml can predict fatal outcome in COVID-19 patients. Key Words: C-reactive protein (CRP), COVID-19 infection, D-dimer, Ferritin, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Mortality.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies
4.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 32(1): 2-3, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596110
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 762782, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593084

ABSTRACT

Coagulopathy is a frequently reported finding in the pathology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, the molecular mechanism, the involved coagulation factors, and the role of regulatory proteins in homeostasis are not fully investigated. We explored the dynamic changes of nine coagulation tests in patients and controls to propose a molecular mechanism for COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. Coagulation tests including prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), fibrinogen (FIB), lupus anticoagulant (LAC), proteins C and S, antithrombin III (ATIII), D-dimer, and fibrin degradation products (FDPs) were performed on plasma collected from 105 individuals (35 critical patients, 35 severe patients, and 35 healthy controls). There was a statically significant difference when the results of the critical (CRT) and/or severe (SVR) group for the following tests were compared to the control (CRL) group: PTCRT (15.014) and PTSVR (13.846) (PTCRL = 13.383, p < 0.001), PTTCRT (42.923) and PTTSVR (37.8) (PTTCRL = 36.494, p < 0.001), LACCRT (49.414) and LACSVR (47.046) (LACCRL = 40.763, p < 0.001), FIBCRT (537.66) and FIBSVR (480.29) (FIBCRL = 283.57, p < 0.001), ProCCRT (85.57%) and ProCSVR (99.34%) (ProCCRL = 94.31%, p = 0.04), ProSCRT (62.91%) and ProSSVR (65.06%) (ProSCRL = 75.03%, p < 0.001), D-dimer (p < 0.0001, χ 2 = 34.812), and FDP (p < 0.002, χ 2 = 15.205). No significant association was found in the ATIII results in groups (ATIIICRT = 95.71% and ATIIISVR = 99.63%; ATIIICRL = 98.74%, p = 0.321). D-dimer, FIB, PT, PTT, LAC, protein S, FDP, and protein C (ordered according to p-values) have significance in the prognosis of patients. Disruptions in homeostasis in protein C (and S), VIII/VIIIa and V/Va axes, probably play a role in COVID-19-associated coagulopathy.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Tests/methods , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Factors/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Female , Fibrin/metabolism , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Homeostasis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Prognosis , Protein C/metabolism , Prothrombin Time , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580687

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection is associated with a broad spectrum of presentations, but alveolar capillary microthrombi have been described as a common finding in COVID-19 patients, appearing as a consequence of a severe endothelial injury with endothelial cell membrane disruption. These observations clearly point to the identification of a COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, which may contribute to thrombosis, multi-organ damage, and cause of severity and fatality. One significant finding that emerges in prothrombotic abnormalities observed in COVID-19 patients is that the coagulation alterations are mainly mediated by the activation of platelets and intrinsically related to viral-mediated endothelial inflammation. Beyond the well-known role in hemostasis, the ability of platelets to also release various potent cytokines and chemokines has elevated these small cells from simple cell fragments to crucial modulators in the blood, including their inflammatory functions, that have a large influence on the immune response during infectious disease. Indeed, platelets are involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury also by promoting NET formation and affecting vascular permeability. Specifically, the deposition by activated platelets of the chemokine platelet factor 4 at sites of inflammation promotes adhesion of neutrophils on endothelial cells and thrombogenesis, and it seems deeply involved in the phenomenon of vaccine-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Importantly, the hyperactivated platelet phenotype along with evidence of cytokine storm, high levels of P-selectin, D-dimer, and, on the other hand, decreased levels of fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and thrombocytopenia may be considered suitable biomarkers that distinguish the late stage of COVID-19 progression in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , COVID-19/blood , Thrombosis/pathology , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hemostasis , Humans , Inflammation , Phenotype , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombocytopenia/metabolism , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology
7.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211010973, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582642

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 in COVID-19 triggers abnormalities in coagulation parameters that can contribute to thrombosis. The goals of this research were to determine the levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer and FDP in COVID-19 patients. Following a systematic study, among 1198 articles, 35 studies were included in the meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in both severe and non-severe groups. The funnel plot, Egger's regression asymmetry test, and Begg's test used to measure the bias of publications. All meta-analysis performed by comprehensive meta-analysis version 2 (CMA2). The pooled findings of fibrinogen levels revealed a significant rise in fibrinogen levels in severe COVID-19 than non-severe patients with COVID-19. The D-dimer and FDP levels were significantly higher in severe patients than non-severe patients with COVID-19 were. The levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, and FDP have increased significantly in ICU patients compared to non-ICU patients. Although, levels of clotting parameters do not always correlate with the severity of disease, these findings showed the diagnostic importance for fibrinogen, D-dimer, and FDP in COVID-19. The presence of a continuous rise in serial measurements of fibrinogen, D-dimer, and FDP may predict that patients with COVID-19 may become critically ill.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrinogen/analysis , Hemostasis , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Humans , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology
8.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 181-188, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575964

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To illustrate the effect of corticosteroids and heparin, respectively, on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients' CD8+ T cells and D-dimer. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study involving 866 participants diagnosed with COVID-19, patients were grouped by severity. Generalized additive models were established to explore the time-course association of representative parameters of coagulation, inflammation and immunity. Segmented regression was performed to examine the influence of corticosteroids and heparin upon CD8+ T cell and D-dimer, respectively. RESULTS: There were 541 moderate, 169 severe and 156 critically ill patients involved in the study. Synchronous changes of levels of NLR, D-dimer and CD8+ T cell in critically ill patients were observed. Administration of methylprednisolone before 14 DFS compared with those after 14 DFS (ß = 0.154%, 95% CI=(0, 0.302), p=.048) or a dose lower than 40 mg per day compared with those equals to 40 mg per day (ß = 0.163%, 95% CI=(0.027, 0.295), p=.020) significantly increased the rising rate of CD8+ T cell in 14-56 DFS. CONCLUSIONS: The parameters of coagulation, inflammation and immunity were longitudinally correlated, and an early low-dose corticosteroid treatment accelerated the regaining of CD8+ T cell to help battle against SARS-Cov-2 in critical cases of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Inflammation/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/immunology , Heparin/administration & dosage , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Linear Models , Longitudinal Studies , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , Young Adult
9.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247676, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575816

ABSTRACT

We retrospectively evaluated 2879 hospitalized COVID-19 patients from four hospitals to evaluate the ability of demographic data, medical history, and on-admission laboratory parameters to predict in-hospital mortality. Association of previously published risk factors (age, gender, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking habit, obesity, renal failure, cardiovascular/ pulmonary diseases, serum ferritin, lymphocyte count, APTT, PT, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and platelet count) with death was tested by a multivariate logistic regression, and a predictive model was created, with further validation in an independent sample. A total of 2070 hospitalized COVID-19 patients were finally included in the multivariable analysis. Age 61-70 years (p<0.001; OR: 7.69; 95%CI: 2.93 to 20.14), age 71-80 years (p<0.001; OR: 14.99; 95%CI: 5.88 to 38.22), age >80 years (p<0.001; OR: 36.78; 95%CI: 14.42 to 93.85), male gender (p<0.001; OR: 1.84; 95%CI: 1.31 to 2.58), D-dimer levels >2 ULN (p = 0.003; OR: 1.79; 95%CI: 1.22 to 2.62), and prolonged PT (p<0.001; OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.49 to 3.18) were independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality. A predictive model performed with these parameters showed an AUC of 0.81 in the development cohort (n = 1270) [sensitivity of 95.83%, specificity of 41.46%, negative predictive value of 98.01%, and positive predictive value of 24.85%]. These results were then validated in an independent data sample (n = 800). Our predictive model of in-hospital mortality of COVID-19 patients has been developed, calibrated and validated. The model (MRS-COVID) included age, male gender, and on-admission coagulopathy markers as positively correlated factors with fatal outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211057901, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574829

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Proinflammatory and hypercoagulable states with marked elevation seen in D-Dimer levels have been accurately described in patients infected by the SARS- Cov2 even without pulmonary embolism (PE). OBJECTIVES: To compare D-dimers values in patients infected by the novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) with and without PE and to establish an optimal D-dimer cut-off to predict the occurrence of PE, which guides pulmonary computed tomography angiography (CTPA) indication. METHODS: We retrospectively enrolled all COVID-19-patients admitted between October first and November 22th, 2020, at the University Hospital Center of Mohammed VI, Oujda (Morocco), suspected to have PE and underwent a CTPA. Demographic characteristics and blood test results were compared between PE-positive and PE-negative. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was constructed to establish an optimal D-Dimer cut-off to predict the occurrence of PE. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 84 confirmed COVID-19-patients. The mean age was 64.93 years (SD 14.19). PE was diagnosed on CTPA in 31 (36.9%) patients. Clinical symptoms and in-hospital outcomes were similar in both groups except that more men had PE (p = .025). The median value of D-dimers in the group of patients with PE was significantly higher (14 680[IQR 33620-3450]ng/mL compared to the group of patients without PE 2980[IQR 6870-1600]ng/mL [P < .001]. A D-dimer at 2600 ng/mL was the optimal cut-off for predicting PE with a sensitivity of 90.3%, and AUC was .773[CI 95%, .667 -.876). CONCLUSION: A D-dimer cut-off value of 2600 ng/mL is a significant predictor of PE in COVID-19-patients with a sensitivity of 90.3%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 255(4): 315-323, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574510

ABSTRACT

The third wave of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is causing damage all over the world, especially in Pakistan and India. Although vaccines are available and preventive measures are being taken, but SARS-CoV-2 is unstoppable. Currently, there are around 841,636 positive cases in Pakistan and 18,429 deaths, whereas, in India, both are high. From April 8th to 12th, 2021, nasopharyngeal swabs of 190 patients were submitted to PRL (PACP) lab for the SARS-CoV-2 testing, and blood samples were collected at the Mayo Hospital lab for ferritin, D-dimers, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and C-reactive protein (CRP) testing. This study observed that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was more likely in individuals aged 51-60 than 61-70. In addition, our study found that COVID-19 patients exhibited a statistically significant increase in levels of ferritin, D-dimers, LDH, and CRP. In addition, this study found that COVID-19 patients had significantly higher levels of ferritin, D-dimers, LDH, and CRP. Our study revealed that SARS-CoV-2 relapsed. Furthermore, we concluded that these biochemical parameters are useful indicators for severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
14.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 6304189, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1553755

ABSTRACT

Background: Early identification of patients with severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at an increased risk of progression may promote more individualized treatment schemes and optimize the use of medical resources. This study is aimed at investigating the utility of the C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio for early risk stratification of patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 557 patients with COVID-19 with confirmed outcomes (discharged or deceased) admitted to the West Court of Union Hospital, Wuhan, China, between January 29, 2020 and April 8, 2020. Patients with severe COVID-19 (n = 465) were divided into stable (n = 409) and progressive (n = 56) groups according to whether they progressed to critical illness or death during hospitalization. To predict disease progression, the CRP/Alb ratio was evaluated on admission. Results: The levels of new biomarkers, including neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio, CRP/Alb ratio, and systemic immune-inflammation index, were higher in patients with progressive disease than in those with stable disease. Correlation analysis showed that the CRP/Alb ratio had the strongest positive correlation with the sequential organ failure assessment score and length of hospital stay in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2), D-dimer levels, and the CRP/Alb ratio were risk factors for disease progression. To predict clinical progression, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of Alb, CRP, CRP/Alb ratio, SpO2, and D-dimer were 0.769, 0.838, 0.866, 0.107, and 0.748, respectively. Moreover, patients with a high CRP/Alb ratio (≥1.843) had a markedly higher rate of clinical deterioration (log - rank p < 0.001). A higher CRP/Alb ratio (≥1.843) was also closely associated with higher rates of hospital mortality, ICU admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, and a longer hospital stay. Conclusion: The CRP/Alb ratio can predict the risk of progression to critical disease or death early, providing a promising prognostic biomarker for risk stratification and clinical management of patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronary Disease/diagnosis , Hypertension/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serum Albumin, Human/metabolism , Aged , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronary Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Disease/mortality , Coronary Disease/virology , Disease Progression , Early Diagnosis , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lymphocytes/pathology , Lymphocytes/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Prognosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/mortality , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6703-6713, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544323

ABSTRACT

Scores to identify patients at high risk of progression of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), may become instrumental for clinical decision-making and patient management. We used patient data from the multicentre Lean European Open Survey on SARS-CoV-2-Infected Patients (LEOSS) and applied variable selection to develop a simplified scoring system to identify patients at increased risk of critical illness or death. A total of 1946 patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were included in the initial analysis and assigned to derivation and validation cohorts (n = 1297 and n = 649, respectively). Stability selection from over 100 baseline predictors for the combined endpoint of progression to the critical phase or COVID-19-related death enabled the development of a simplified score consisting of five predictors: C-reactive protein (CRP), age, clinical disease phase (uncomplicated vs. complicated), serum urea, and D-dimer (abbreviated as CAPS-D score). This score yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77-0.85) in the validation cohort for predicting the combined endpoint within 7 days of diagnosis and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77-0.85) during full follow-up. We used an additional prospective cohort of 682 patients, diagnosed largely after the "first wave" of the pandemic to validate the predictive accuracy of the score and observed similar results (AUC for the event within 7 days: 0.83 [95% CI: 0.78-0.87]; for full follow-up: 0.82 [95% CI: 0.78-0.86]). An easily applicable score to calculate the risk of COVID-19 progression to critical illness or death was thus established and validated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Urea/blood , Young Adult
16.
J Int Med Res ; 49(11): 3000605211059939, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and inflammation are associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity. This study assessed D-dimer concentration and its correlation with inflammatory markers and COVID-19 severity. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 194 COVID-19 cases, with the severity of infection graded in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. We measured D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), and ferritin on admission and determined the cutoff values for D-dimer and CRP and evaluated the correlation between D-dimer and CRP and ferritin. RESULTS: Median D-dimer, CRP, and ferritin concentrations were 2240 µg/L, 73.2 mg/L, and 1173.8 µg/mL, respectively. The highest median D-dimer value was seen in mild and moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The highest ferritin concentration was seen in severe ARDS. There was a significant correlation between D-dimer value and CRP (r = 0.327), but no significant correlation between D-dimer and ferritin (r = 0.101). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the combination of CRP ≥72.65 mg/L and D-dimer ≥1250 µg/L as a marker of COVID-19 severity was 0.722 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.615-0.781). CONCLUSION: The combination of CRP ≥72.65 mg/L and D-dimer ≥1250 µg/L can be used as marker of COVID-19 severity, with moderate accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitals , Humans , Indonesia , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
17.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3478-3486, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525606

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Venous thrombotic events (VTE) are frequent in COVID-19, and elevated plasma D-dimer (pDd) and dyspnea are common in both entities. OBJECTIVE: To determine the admission pDd cut-off value associated with in-hospital VTE in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Multicenter, retrospective study analyzing the at-admission pDd cut-off value to predict VTE and anticoagulation intensity along hospitalization due to COVID-19. RESULTS: Among 9386 patients, 2.2% had VTE: 1.6% pulmonary embolism (PE), 0.4% deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and 0.2% both. Those with VTE had a higher prevalence of tachypnea (42.9% vs. 31.1%; p = 0.0005), basal O2 saturation <93% (45.4% vs. 33.1%; p = 0.0003), higher at admission pDd (median [IQR]: 1.4 [0.6-5.5] vs. 0.6 [0.4-1.2] µg/ml; p < 0.0001) and platelet count (median [IQR]: 208 [158-289] vs. 189 [148-245] platelets × 109/L; p = 0.0013). A pDd cut-off of 1.1 µg/ml showed specificity 72%, sensitivity 49%, positive predictive value (PPV) 4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 99% for in-hospital VTE. A cut-off value of 4.7 µg/ml showed specificity of 95%, sensitivity of 27%, PPV of 9%, and NPV of 98%. Overall mortality was proportional to pDd value, with the lowest incidence for each pDd category depending on anticoagulation intensity: 26.3% for those with pDd >1.0 µg/ml treated with prophylactic dose (p < 0.0001), 28.8% for pDd for patients with pDd >2.0 µg/ml treated with intermediate dose (p = 0.0001), and 31.3% for those with pDd >3.0 µg/ml and full anticoagulation (p = 0.0183). CONCLUSIONS: In hospitalized patients with COVID-19, a pDd value greater than 3.0 µg/ml can be considered to screen VTE and to consider full-dose anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitalization , Humans , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
18.
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc ; 79(2): 269-277, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To study whether D-dimer daily continuous tendency could predict the short-term prognosis of COVID-19. PATIENTS AND METHODES: According to the short-term prognosis, 81 COVID-19 patients were divided into two groups, one of worse prognosis (Group W) and the other of better prognosis (Group B). The slope of D-dimer linear regression during hospitalization (SLOPE) was calculated as an indicator of D-dimer daily continuous tendency. The SLOPE difference between Group W and Group B was compared. The difference between the discharge results and the 3-month follow-up results was also compared. COX regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between SLOPE and short-term prognosis of COVID-19. RESULTS: There were 16 patients in Group W and 65 patients in Group B. Group W had more critical proportion (p < 0.0001), indicating that the symptoms of its patients were more severe during hospitalization. ARDS, the most visible cause of worse prognosis, accounted for up to 68.75%, and many symptoms merged and resulted in worse prognosis. The D-dimer levels of Group W not only were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), but also showed an increasing trend. In addition, the D-dimer levels at discharge were significantly higher than those at follow-up (p = 0.0261), and the mean difference was as high as 0.7474. SLOPE significantly correlated with the short-term prognosis of COVID-19 independently (RR: 1.687, 95% CI: 1.345-2.116, P < 0.0001). The worst prognosis occurred most likely during the first month after COVID-19 diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Our study found that D-dimer daily continuous tendency independently correlates with worse prognosis and can be used as an independent predictor of the short-term prognosis for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , COVID-19 Testing , China , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Humans , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211061149, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523222
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