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1.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 130(3): 108-114, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Acute or chronic stress may trigger or aggravate symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM). We aimed to evaluate the physical and mental health of fibromyalgia patients during the COVID 19 outbreak and identify protective/risk factors. METHODS: An online survey was published in May 2020, following two months of lockdown due to the COVID 19 outbreak, including questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, access to medical services, anxiety, depression, life approach, coping strategies, perception of social support, widespread pain index (WPI) and symptoms severity scale (SSS), insomnia severity index (ISI) and patient global assessment. RESULTS: Of the 233 patients included in the study, 98% were forced to discontinue complementary or alternative treatments during lockdown. Up to 30% of responders who had been treated with medical cannabis had to stop due to logistic difficulties and this was associated with significantly higher scores of WPI/SSS (p=0.024). Higher levels of anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with higher levels of pain, sleep disorders and subjective perception of deterioration (p=0.00). Higher scores of social support and positive life approach were correlated with less anxiety and depression (p<0.01), lower levels of pain (p<0.05) and less sleep disturbances (p<0.01). Avoidant coping style was strongly associated to higher levels of pain, sleep disturbances, anxiety, depression, and subjective perception of worsening (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Fibromyalgia patients reported adverse mental and physical outcomes during the COVID-19 outbreak. Factors such as stopping current treatments may play a central role. Social support and a positive life approach appear to be protective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Anxiety/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732046

ABSTRACT

The management of patients with immuno-rheumatological diseases has profoundly changed during the COVID-19 pandemic and telemedicine has played an important role in the disease follow-up. In addition to monitoring disease activity and any adverse events, especially infectious events, assessing the psychological situation of the patient can be fundamental. Furthermore, COVID-19 has a serious impact on mental health and, since the beginning of the pandemic, a significantly higher incidence of anxiety disorders and depressive symptoms especially in younger people was observed. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of depressive disorders, anxiety, and fibromyalgia (FM) in our patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis during the lockdown period due to the COVID-19 pandemic and we validate the use of telemedicine in the clinical management of these patients. Mental and physical stress during the COVID-19 pandemic can greatly worsen FM symptoms and intensify patients' suffering without a clinical flare of the inflammatory disease for patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. Telemedicine has allowed us to identify patients who needed a face-to-face approach for therapeutic reevaluation even if not related to a flare of the inflammatory disease. Even if our data does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions regarding the effectiveness of telemedicine as greater than or equal to the standard face-to-face approach, we continue to work by modifying our approach to try to ensure the necessary care in compliance with safety and, optimistically, this tool will become an important part of rheumatic disease management.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Mental Disorders , Rheumatic Diseases , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Psoriatic/complications , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology
3.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261772, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591204

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify predicators of patients with fibromyalgia (FM) that are associated with a severe COVID-19 disease course. METHODS: We utilized the data base of the Clalit Health Services (CHS); the largest public organization in Israel, and extracted data concerning patients with FM. We matched two subjects without FM to each subject with FM by sex and age and geographic location. Baseline characteristics were evaluated by t-test for continuous variables and chi-square for categorical variables. Predictors of COVID-19 associated hospitalization were identified using univariable logistic regression model, significant variables were selected and analyzed by a multivariable logistic regression model. RESULTS: The initial cohort comprised 18,598 patients with FM and 36,985 matched controls. The mean age was 57.5± 14.5(SD), with a female dominance of 91%. Out of this cohort we extracted the study population, which included all patients contracted with COVID-19, and consisted of 571 patients with FM and 1008 controls. By multivariable analysis, the following variables were found to predict COVID-19 associated hospitalization in patients with FM: older age (OR, 1.25; CI, 1.13-1.39; p<0.001), male sex (OR, 2.63; CI, 1.18-5.88; p<0.05) and hypertension (OR, 1.75; CI, 1.04-2.95; p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The current population-based study revealed that FM per se was not directly associated with COVID-19 hospitalization or related mortality. Yet classical risk factors endangering the general population were also relevant among patients with FM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456322

ABSTRACT

Poor sleep quality is a common concern and a troublesome symptom among patients suffering from fibromyalgia. The purpose of this review was to identify and describe the available patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) of sleep quality validated in adult people diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The COSMIN and PRISMA recommendations were followed. An electronic systematized search in the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science was carried out. Validation studies of PROMs of sleep quality in fibromyalgia published in English or Spanish were included. The selection of the studies was developed through a peer review process through the online software "COVIDENCE". The quality of the studies was assessed using the COSMIN Risk of Bias checklist. A total of 5 PROMs were found validated in patients with fibromyalgia: (1) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), (2) Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS), (3) Sleep Quality Numeric Rating Scale (SQ-NRS), (4) Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale (MOS-SS), and (5) Fibromyalgia Sleep Diary (FSD). The quality of the evidence was very good and the quality of the results ranged from moderate to high. All the included PROMs, except for the FSD, showed adequate psychometric properties and, therefore, are valid and reliable tools for assessing sleep quality in the context of FM. However, none of the studies analyzed all the psychometric properties of the included PROMs as established in the COSMIN guidelines, highlighting that this is a potential field of research for future investigations.


Subject(s)
Depressive Disorder, Major , Fibromyalgia , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Female , Fibromyalgia/complications , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , Male , Psychometrics , Quality of Life , Reproducibility of Results , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Pain Manag ; 12(3): 255-260, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450778

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a novel virus that has caused a plethora of dysfunctions and changes in the human body. Our goal in this case study series was to demonstrate the relationship that coronavirus has had in newly diagnosing patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MFPS). Medical records were obtained from a pain clinic that demonstrated the effects of this virus on patients who developed MFPS between March 2020 and December 2020. Chart reviews were performed and demonstrated patients who had a history of chronic pain had subsequent episodes of worsening exacerbations of pain, more specifically trigger points, after being diagnosed with coronavirus. MFPS and SARS-CoV-2 are proposed to be correlated amongst chronic pain patients. Potential pathological mechanisms include coronavirus-induced hypoxic muscle dysfunctions as well as psychological stress triggering pain receptors, leading to myofascial pain syndrome.


COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, may cause many problems and changes in the human body. In this case series, we propose a relationship between COVID-19 and myofascial pain syndrome (MFPS), a kind of chronic muscle pain affecting connective tissue in the muscles. Medical records of people who developed MFPS after a diagnosis of COVID-19 between March 2020 and December 2020 were obtained from a pain clinic. Chart reviews demonstrated that the three people with chronic pain included in this case series had episodes of worsening pain, more specifically in focal points, after being diagnosed with COVID-19. COVID-19 is suggested to have affected the development of MFPS in these chronic pain patients. Potential mechanisms of this relationship include different types of stress leading to MFPS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Myofascial Pain Syndromes , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Myofascial Pain Syndromes/complications , Myofascial Pain Syndromes/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Trigger Points
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444205

ABSTRACT

FIBROWALK is a multicomponent program including pain neuroscience education, therapeutic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness training that has recently been found to be effective in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). This RCT started before the COVID-19 pandemic and was moved to a virtual format (i.e., online videos) when the lockdown was declared in Spain. This study is aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a virtual FIBROWALK compared to Treatment-As-Usual (TAU) in patients with FM during the first state of alarm in Spain. A total of 151 patients with FM were randomized into two study arms: FIBROWALK plus TAU vs. TAU alone. The primary outcome was functional impairment. Secondary outcomes were kinesiophobia, anxiety and depressive symptomatology, and physical functioning. Differences between groups at post-treatment assessment were analyzed using Intention-To-Treat (ITT) and completer approaches. Baseline differences between clinical responders and non-responders were also explored. Statistically significant improvements with small-to-moderate effect sizes were observed in FIBROWALK+TAU vs. TAU regarding functional impairment and most secondary outcomes. In our study, the NNT was 5, which was, albeit modestly, indicative of an efficacious intervention. The results of this proof-of-concept RCT preliminarily support the efficacy of virtual FIBROWALK in patients with FM during the Spanish COVID-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Communicable Disease Control , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 693159, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441154

ABSTRACT

Background: In the face of the contemporary COVID-19 pandemic, health service providers have emerged as the most at-risk individuals who are likely to contract the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Aim: To measure the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) during COVID outbreak among health workers in Saudi Arabia using FiRST and LFESSQ tool. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional methodology to explore the prevalence of Fibromyalgia among health workers at different health care settings in Saudi Arabia. The assessment of the prevalence of fibromyalgia among health worker was determined by using the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool (FiRST) and London Fibromyalgia Epidemiological Study Screening Questionnaire (LFESSQ) questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Results: The sample size included 992 participants. The prevalence of fibromyalgia using FiRST and LFESSQ was 12.6 and 19.8%, respectively. In this study, the prevalence of fibromyalgia was higher in females when compared to males. Most of the respondents have Vitamin D deficiency. The relationship of fibromyalgia was significantly associated with the participants who worked during an outbreak, who covered COVID-19 inpatient, covered in-hospital on call and in area quarantine. Conclusion: The study's findings demonstrate that the prevalence of Fibromyalgia among health service providers during the current COVID-19 pandemic is considerably higher and that there are potential interventions that may be employed to mitigate the prevalence of the infection during the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
8.
RMD Open ; 7(3)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370912

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Postacute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS) is an emerging entity characterised by a large array of manifestations, including musculoskeletal complaints, fatigue and cognitive or sleep disturbances. Since similar symptoms are present also in patients with fibromyalgia (FM), we decided to perform a web-based cross-sectional survey aimed at investigating the prevalence and predictors of FM in patients who recovered from COVID-19. METHODS: Data were anonymously collected between 5 and 18 April 2021. The collection form consisted of 28 questions gathering demographic information, features and duration of acute COVID-19, comorbid diseases, and other individual's attributes such as height and weight. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Survey Criteria and the Italian version of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire completed the survey. RESULTS: A final sample of 616 individuals (77.4% women) filled the form 6±3 months after the COVID-19 diagnosis. Of these, 189 (30.7%) satisfied the ACR survey criteria for FM (56.6% women). A multivariate logistic regression model including demographic and clinical factors showed that male gender (OR: 9.95, 95% CI 6.02 to 16.43, p<0.0001) and obesity (OR: 41.20, 95% CI 18.00 to 98.88, p<0.0001) were the strongest predictors of being classified as having post-COVID-19 FM. Hospital admission rate was significantly higher in men (15.8% vs 9.2%, p=0.001) and obese (19.2 vs 10.8%, p=0.016) respondents. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that clinical features of FM are common in patients who recovered from COVID-19 and that obesity and male gender affect the risk of developing post-COVID-19 FM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
9.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 41, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals faced psychological stress caused by fear and anxiety due to the high transmission and mortality rate of the disease, the social isolation, economic problems, and difficulties in reaching health services. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic centralized pain sensitivity disorder. Psychological, physical and/or autoimmune stressors were found to increase FM symptoms. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the COVID-19 fear and anxiety level, and to examine their effect on disease severity, sleep quality, and mood in FM patients compared to control group. METHODS: This pilot study conducted as a cross-sectional study, and included 62 participants. Participants were divided into two groups: FM patient group (n = 31) and control group (n = 31). Symptom severity, sleep quality, and mood were determined using the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), Pitsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), respectively. In order to evaluate the level of COVID-19 fear and anxiety, the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) and Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS) were used compared to control group. RESULTS: FIQR, PSQI, HAD-A, HAD-D, FCV-19S and CAS scores were significantly higher in the FM group (p = 0.01). A positive significant correlation was found between FCV-19S and CAS results and FIQR, PSQI, and HAD-anx results in FM patients (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This pilot study showed that, the individuals with FM can be more affected by psychological stress, and this situation negatively affects the symptom severity, sleep quality, and mood in FM patients, so these patients should be closely monitored in terms of psychological stressors and their effects during pandemics. More studies with more participants are necessary to describe the challenges lived by fibromyalgia population.


Subject(s)
Affect , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Sleep , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Severity of Illness Index , Socioeconomic Factors
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We analyzed the immediate effects of a Telerehabilitation Program (TP) based on aerobic exercise in women with fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome during the lockdown declared in Spain due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A single-blind randomized controlled trial was designed. Thirty-four women with FM were randomized into two groups: TP group and Control group. The intervention lasted 15 weeks, with 2 sessions per week. The TP based on aerobic exercise was guided by video and the intensity of each session was monitored using the Borg scale. Pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), mechanical pain sensitivity (algometer), number of tender points, FM impact (Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), physiological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), upper (Arm Curl Test) and lower-limb physical function (6-min Walk Test) were measured at baseline and after the intervention. RESULTS: The TP group improved pain intensity (p = 0.022), mechanical pain sensitivity (p < 0.05), and psychological distress (p = 0.005), compared to the Control group. The Control group showed no statistically significant changes in any variable (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A TP based on aerobic exercise achieved improvements on pain intensity, mechanical pain sensitivity, and psychological distress compared to a Control group during the lockdown declared in Spain due to COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy , Fibromyalgia/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Single-Blind Method , Spain , Treatment Outcome
12.
Pain ; 162(2): 619-629, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940829

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a tremendous impact, including on individuals with chronic pain. The social distancing policies necessary to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2 have involved increased levels of social isolation. This cross-sectional survey study examined pain severity and interference among individuals with chronic pain during an early phase of social distancing mandates and identified characteristics of individuals who were most impacted. Approximately 4 to 8 weeks after social distancing mandates commenced in the state of Massachusetts, 150 patients with fibromyalgia, chronic spine, and postsurgical pain completed demographic, pain, social distancing, and validated psychosocial questionnaires. Patients self-reported an overall significant increase in pain severity and pain interference, compared with before social distancing, although both pain severity and interference were quite variable among individuals under conditions of social distancing. Several demographic, socioeconomic, and psychosocial factors were associated with greater pain severity and interference during social distancing. Multivariable linear regression demonstrated that female sex, nonwhite race, lower education, disability, fibromyalgia, and higher pain catastrophizing were independently associated with greater pain severity, while female sex and pain catastrophizing were independently associated greater pain interference. The findings suggest that individual differences among patients with chronic pain should be considered in the planning, development, and prioritization of interventions to improve pain care and to prevent worsening of symptoms during the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Back Pain/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Fibromyalgia/physiopathology , Pain, Postoperative/physiopathology , Physical Distancing , Adult , African Americans , Back Pain/psychology , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disabled Persons , Educational Status , Female , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Massachusetts , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pain Measurement , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 130(3): 72-77, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-924960

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a complex disease that is mainly characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and sleep disturbances and may be precipitated or worsened by many stressors. The aim of this study was to observe the behaviour of FM symptoms during the course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Patients who had been diagnosed as having FM for ≥3 months were recruited between February and May 2020. The collected data were age, sex, educational level and marital status; height and weight; and the scores of the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), the modified Fibromyalgia Assessment Status 2019 (FASmod), and the Polysymptomatic Distress Scale (PDS). The patients were divided into those with or without concomitant COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Eight hundred and ninety-seven (93%) of the 965 patients (881 women [91.3%] and 84 men [8.7%]) were followed up on an outpatient basis because of FM and 68 (7.0%) were either followed up as out-patients or hospitalised because of COVID-19. There was no difference in the sociodemographic data of the two groups, but there were statistically significant between-group differences in the results of the clinimetric tests. The major differences between the score of the items (those with the greatest disease impact) were the following related symptoms: sleep quality (FIQR15), fatigue/energy (FIQR13), pain (FIQR12), stiffness (FIQR14). CONCLUSIONS: The mean total and subdomain scores of all the tests were significantly higher in the patients with COVID-19, which suggests that global FM symptoms are more severe in patients with infection. Further studies of the post-COVID19 patients are being carried out in order to discover whether the worsened symptomatology continues because of their hypersensitised state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
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