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1.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 130(3): 108-114, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Acute or chronic stress may trigger or aggravate symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM). We aimed to evaluate the physical and mental health of fibromyalgia patients during the COVID 19 outbreak and identify protective/risk factors. METHODS: An online survey was published in May 2020, following two months of lockdown due to the COVID 19 outbreak, including questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, access to medical services, anxiety, depression, life approach, coping strategies, perception of social support, widespread pain index (WPI) and symptoms severity scale (SSS), insomnia severity index (ISI) and patient global assessment. RESULTS: Of the 233 patients included in the study, 98% were forced to discontinue complementary or alternative treatments during lockdown. Up to 30% of responders who had been treated with medical cannabis had to stop due to logistic difficulties and this was associated with significantly higher scores of WPI/SSS (p=0.024). Higher levels of anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with higher levels of pain, sleep disorders and subjective perception of deterioration (p=0.00). Higher scores of social support and positive life approach were correlated with less anxiety and depression (p<0.01), lower levels of pain (p<0.05) and less sleep disturbances (p<0.01). Avoidant coping style was strongly associated to higher levels of pain, sleep disturbances, anxiety, depression, and subjective perception of worsening (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Fibromyalgia patients reported adverse mental and physical outcomes during the COVID-19 outbreak. Factors such as stopping current treatments may play a central role. Social support and a positive life approach appear to be protective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Anxiety/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732046

ABSTRACT

The management of patients with immuno-rheumatological diseases has profoundly changed during the COVID-19 pandemic and telemedicine has played an important role in the disease follow-up. In addition to monitoring disease activity and any adverse events, especially infectious events, assessing the psychological situation of the patient can be fundamental. Furthermore, COVID-19 has a serious impact on mental health and, since the beginning of the pandemic, a significantly higher incidence of anxiety disorders and depressive symptoms especially in younger people was observed. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of depressive disorders, anxiety, and fibromyalgia (FM) in our patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis during the lockdown period due to the COVID-19 pandemic and we validate the use of telemedicine in the clinical management of these patients. Mental and physical stress during the COVID-19 pandemic can greatly worsen FM symptoms and intensify patients' suffering without a clinical flare of the inflammatory disease for patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. Telemedicine has allowed us to identify patients who needed a face-to-face approach for therapeutic reevaluation even if not related to a flare of the inflammatory disease. Even if our data does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions regarding the effectiveness of telemedicine as greater than or equal to the standard face-to-face approach, we continue to work by modifying our approach to try to ensure the necessary care in compliance with safety and, optimistically, this tool will become an important part of rheumatic disease management.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Mental Disorders , Rheumatic Diseases , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Psoriatic/complications , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 693159, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441154

ABSTRACT

Background: In the face of the contemporary COVID-19 pandemic, health service providers have emerged as the most at-risk individuals who are likely to contract the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Aim: To measure the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) during COVID outbreak among health workers in Saudi Arabia using FiRST and LFESSQ tool. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional methodology to explore the prevalence of Fibromyalgia among health workers at different health care settings in Saudi Arabia. The assessment of the prevalence of fibromyalgia among health worker was determined by using the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool (FiRST) and London Fibromyalgia Epidemiological Study Screening Questionnaire (LFESSQ) questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Results: The sample size included 992 participants. The prevalence of fibromyalgia using FiRST and LFESSQ was 12.6 and 19.8%, respectively. In this study, the prevalence of fibromyalgia was higher in females when compared to males. Most of the respondents have Vitamin D deficiency. The relationship of fibromyalgia was significantly associated with the participants who worked during an outbreak, who covered COVID-19 inpatient, covered in-hospital on call and in area quarantine. Conclusion: The study's findings demonstrate that the prevalence of Fibromyalgia among health service providers during the current COVID-19 pandemic is considerably higher and that there are potential interventions that may be employed to mitigate the prevalence of the infection during the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
4.
RMD Open ; 7(3)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370912

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Postacute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS) is an emerging entity characterised by a large array of manifestations, including musculoskeletal complaints, fatigue and cognitive or sleep disturbances. Since similar symptoms are present also in patients with fibromyalgia (FM), we decided to perform a web-based cross-sectional survey aimed at investigating the prevalence and predictors of FM in patients who recovered from COVID-19. METHODS: Data were anonymously collected between 5 and 18 April 2021. The collection form consisted of 28 questions gathering demographic information, features and duration of acute COVID-19, comorbid diseases, and other individual's attributes such as height and weight. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Survey Criteria and the Italian version of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire completed the survey. RESULTS: A final sample of 616 individuals (77.4% women) filled the form 6±3 months after the COVID-19 diagnosis. Of these, 189 (30.7%) satisfied the ACR survey criteria for FM (56.6% women). A multivariate logistic regression model including demographic and clinical factors showed that male gender (OR: 9.95, 95% CI 6.02 to 16.43, p<0.0001) and obesity (OR: 41.20, 95% CI 18.00 to 98.88, p<0.0001) were the strongest predictors of being classified as having post-COVID-19 FM. Hospital admission rate was significantly higher in men (15.8% vs 9.2%, p=0.001) and obese (19.2 vs 10.8%, p=0.016) respondents. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that clinical features of FM are common in patients who recovered from COVID-19 and that obesity and male gender affect the risk of developing post-COVID-19 FM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
6.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 130(3): 72-77, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-924960

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a complex disease that is mainly characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and sleep disturbances and may be precipitated or worsened by many stressors. The aim of this study was to observe the behaviour of FM symptoms during the course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Patients who had been diagnosed as having FM for ≥3 months were recruited between February and May 2020. The collected data were age, sex, educational level and marital status; height and weight; and the scores of the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), the modified Fibromyalgia Assessment Status 2019 (FASmod), and the Polysymptomatic Distress Scale (PDS). The patients were divided into those with or without concomitant COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Eight hundred and ninety-seven (93%) of the 965 patients (881 women [91.3%] and 84 men [8.7%]) were followed up on an outpatient basis because of FM and 68 (7.0%) were either followed up as out-patients or hospitalised because of COVID-19. There was no difference in the sociodemographic data of the two groups, but there were statistically significant between-group differences in the results of the clinimetric tests. The major differences between the score of the items (those with the greatest disease impact) were the following related symptoms: sleep quality (FIQR15), fatigue/energy (FIQR13), pain (FIQR12), stiffness (FIQR14). CONCLUSIONS: The mean total and subdomain scores of all the tests were significantly higher in the patients with COVID-19, which suggests that global FM symptoms are more severe in patients with infection. Further studies of the post-COVID19 patients are being carried out in order to discover whether the worsened symptomatology continues because of their hypersensitised state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
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