Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 23(1): 471, 2022 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951165

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and characteristics of post-COVID-19 (PC) in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. METHODS: Retrospective, multi-centric, observational study, comparing a group of FM patients (FM group) with another group of patients with other rheumatic diseases (RD group). COVID-19 diagnosis was established by positive polymerase chain reaction or antigen during acute infection or by positive antibodies thereafter. We considered PC diagnosis when symptoms remain after COVID-19. We collected the principal characteristics of COVID-19, the severity of fatigue, waking unrefreshed and cognitive impairment, and persistent symptoms. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and the Combined Index of Severity in Fibromyalgia (ICAF) were collected in the FM group. RESULTS: RD group (n = 56) had more pneumonia (p = 0.001) and hospital admissions (p = 0.002), but the FM group (n = 78) had a higher number of symptoms (p = 0.002). The percentage of patients with PC was similar between groups (FM group 79.5%; RD group 66.1%, p = 0.081). FM group had more PC symptoms (p = 0.001), more impairment after COVID-19 (p = 0.002) and higher severity of fatigue, waking unrefreshed and cognitive impairment (p <  0.0001). Only loss of smell was more frequent in the FM group (p = 0.005). The FM group with PC (n = 29) showed more severity of the Combined Index of Severity in Fibromyalgia (ICAF) total score and physical factor after COVID-19, while emotional, coping factors and the ACR criteria did not change. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of PC in FM patients is similar to RD patients. In FM patients, the presence of PC does not appear to impact the severity of FM.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Rheumatic Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Humans , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Rheumatic Diseases/diagnosis , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMC Womens Health ; 22(1): 267, 2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910308

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has strongly influenced psychological and physical health worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the pandemic on women with fibromyalgia. METHODS: This mixed methods pilot study explored measures of pain severity and interference, as well as pain catastrophizing and level of fibromyalgia impact among women with fibromyalgia before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA. Fibromyalgia patients completed demographic, pain-related, and other validated psychosocial questionnaires prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and then were re-assessed with those questionnaires, as well as a pandemic-related questionnaire assessing the impact of the pandemic on the patients' life, during the pandemic. RESULTS: When comparing data reported before the pandemic to data collected 3-6 months into the pandemic, women with fibromyalgia reported a general worsening of their pain and pain-related symptoms. During the pandemic, pain catastrophizing (p ≤ 0.05) and fibromyalgia impact (p ≤ 0.05) increased significantly compared to before the pandemic. The increase in pain catastrophizing scores was highly correlated with the impact of the pandemic on the participants' ability to cope with pain and on their mental health. Qualitative analysis corroborated the significant impact of the pandemic on patients' mental health, with the vast majority reporting a worsening of their mood. Other impacted domains included anxiety, level of activity and sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, the pandemic appears to have produced a substantive worsening of pain-related symptomatology among women with fibromyalgia, which should be addressed by targeted interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Humans , Pain/psychology , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life/psychology
3.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(6): 967-972, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787808

ABSTRACT

Multiple overlapping and complementary theoretical arguments suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic could worsen health in fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to determine mental and physical health in women with fibromyalgia before and during the pandemic. In a 3-sample, repeated cross-sectional design, we analyzed questionnaire data from Dutch women with fibromyalgia, collected in three independent samples: before the COVID-19 pandemic (2018; n = 142) and during the first acute (2020; n = 304) and prolonged (2021; n = 95) phases of the pandemic. Eight dimensions of mental and physical health were assessed using The RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (RAND SF-36). Compared to norm group data, both before and during the pandemic, women with fibromyalgia showed high levels of fatigue and pain and low levels of general health, social functioning, physical functioning, role physical functioning (d > 1.2, very large effect sizes), role emotional functioning, and mental health (0.71 < d < 1.2, medium to large effect sizes). Contrary to theoretical expectation, levels at five health variables before vs. during the pandemic did not differ (p > 0.05), and levels of pain (p < 0.001), role physical functioning (p < 0.001), and physical functioning (p = 0.03) (0.014 ≤ pη2 ≤ 0.042, small effect sizes) reflected a healthier status during than before the pandemic. These findings indicate a somewhat better but persistently low health status in women with fibromyalgia during the pandemic. This suggests that the pandemic may include changed circumstances that are favorable for some women with fibromyalgia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Data Analysis , Female , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Health Status , Humans , Pain , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
4.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 41, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals faced psychological stress caused by fear and anxiety due to the high transmission and mortality rate of the disease, the social isolation, economic problems, and difficulties in reaching health services. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic centralized pain sensitivity disorder. Psychological, physical and/or autoimmune stressors were found to increase FM symptoms. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the COVID-19 fear and anxiety level, and to examine their effect on disease severity, sleep quality, and mood in FM patients compared to control group. METHODS: This pilot study conducted as a cross-sectional study, and included 62 participants. Participants were divided into two groups: FM patient group (n = 31) and control group (n = 31). Symptom severity, sleep quality, and mood were determined using the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), Pitsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), respectively. In order to evaluate the level of COVID-19 fear and anxiety, the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) and Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS) were used compared to control group. RESULTS: FIQR, PSQI, HAD-A, HAD-D, FCV-19S and CAS scores were significantly higher in the FM group (p = 0.01). A positive significant correlation was found between FCV-19S and CAS results and FIQR, PSQI, and HAD-anx results in FM patients (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This pilot study showed that, the individuals with FM can be more affected by psychological stress, and this situation negatively affects the symptom severity, sleep quality, and mood in FM patients, so these patients should be closely monitored in terms of psychological stressors and their effects during pandemics. More studies with more participants are necessary to describe the challenges lived by fibromyalgia population.


Subject(s)
Affect , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Sleep , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Severity of Illness Index , Socioeconomic Factors
5.
Pain ; 162(2): 619-629, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940829

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a tremendous impact, including on individuals with chronic pain. The social distancing policies necessary to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2 have involved increased levels of social isolation. This cross-sectional survey study examined pain severity and interference among individuals with chronic pain during an early phase of social distancing mandates and identified characteristics of individuals who were most impacted. Approximately 4 to 8 weeks after social distancing mandates commenced in the state of Massachusetts, 150 patients with fibromyalgia, chronic spine, and postsurgical pain completed demographic, pain, social distancing, and validated psychosocial questionnaires. Patients self-reported an overall significant increase in pain severity and pain interference, compared with before social distancing, although both pain severity and interference were quite variable among individuals under conditions of social distancing. Several demographic, socioeconomic, and psychosocial factors were associated with greater pain severity and interference during social distancing. Multivariable linear regression demonstrated that female sex, nonwhite race, lower education, disability, fibromyalgia, and higher pain catastrophizing were independently associated with greater pain severity, while female sex and pain catastrophizing were independently associated greater pain interference. The findings suggest that individual differences among patients with chronic pain should be considered in the planning, development, and prioritization of interventions to improve pain care and to prevent worsening of symptoms during the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Back Pain/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Fibromyalgia/physiopathology , Pain, Postoperative/physiopathology , Physical Distancing , Adult , African Americans , Back Pain/psychology , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disabled Persons , Educational Status , Female , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Massachusetts , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pain Measurement , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL