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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1052, 2022 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642020

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic provides a major opportunity to study fishing effort dynamics and to assess the response of the industry to standard and remedial actions. Knowing a fishing fleet's capacity to compensate for effort reduction (i.e., its resilience) allows differentiating governmental regulations by fleet, i.e., imposing stronger restrictions on the more resilient and weaker restrictions on the less resilient. In the present research, the response of the main fishing fleets of the Adriatic Sea to fishing hour reduction from 2015 to 2020 was measured. Fleet activity per gear type was inferred from monthly Automatic Identification System data. Pattern recognition techniques were applied to study the fishing effort trends and barycentres by gear. The beneficial effects of the lockdowns on Adriatic endangered, threatened and protected (ETP) species were also estimated. Finally, fleet effort series were examined through a stock assessment model to demonstrate that every Adriatic fishing fleet generally behaves like a stock subject to significant stress, which was particularly highlighted by the pandemic. Our findings lend support to the notion that the Adriatic fleets can be compared to predators with medium-high resilience and a generally strong impact on ETP species.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fisheries/economics , Models, Economic , Pandemics/economics , Quarantine/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261615, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592216

ABSTRACT

One of the most pressing challenges facing food systems in Africa is ensuring availability of a healthy and sustainable diet to 2.4 billion people by 2050. The continent has struggled with development challenges, particularly chronic food insecurity and pervasive poverty. In Africa's food systems, fish and other aquatic foods play a multifaceted role in generating income, and providing a critical source of essential micronutrients. To date, there are no estimates of investment and potential returns for domestic fish production in Africa. To contribute to policy debates about the future of fish in Africa, we applied the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agriculture Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) to explore two Pan-African scenarios for fish sector growth: a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and a high-growth scenario for capture fisheries and aquaculture with accompanying strong gross domestic product growth (HIGH). Post-model analysis was used to estimate employment and aquaculture investment requirements for the sector in Africa. Africa's fish sector is estimated to support 20.7 million jobs in 2030, and 21.6 million by 2050 under the BAU. Approximately 2.6 people will be employed indirectly along fisheries and aquaculture value chains for every person directly employed in the fish production stage. Under the HIGH scenario, total employment in Africa's fish food system will reach 58.0 million jobs, representing 2.4% of total projected population in Africa by 2050. Aquaculture production value is estimated to achieve US$ 3.3 billion and US$ 20.4 billion per year under the BAU and HIGH scenarios by 2050, respectively. Farm-gate investment costs for the three key inputs (fish feeds, farm labor, and fish seed) to achieve the aquaculture volumes projected by 2050 are estimated at US$ 1.8 billion per year under the BAU and US$ 11.6 billion per year under the HIGH scenario. Sustained investments are critical to sustain capture fisheries and support aquaculture growth for food system transformation towards healthier diets.


Subject(s)
Fisheries/economics , Africa , Commerce/economics , Commerce/legislation & jurisprudence , Employment , Fisheries/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Investments , Models, Economic
3.
J Agromedicine ; 25(4): 388-391, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174765

ABSTRACT

This commentary provides an overview of the impact of COVID-19 on the commercial fishing industry. The information highlighted in the article was gathered from fishermen, fishing industry experts, health and safety advisors, and advocates. From these first-hand accounts, we provide the immediate and expansive impacts of COVID-19 on fishermen's health and wellbeing. In particular, we discuss the economic impact of COVID-19 market disruptions, as well as the very real, logistical challenges of protecting workers on fishing vessels. We also provide examples of how these combined issues have led to increased occupational risk in one of the nation's most deadly industries. Lastly, we identify a number of recommendations for providing much-needed support for commercial fishermen in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Farmers , Fisheries/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Farmers/psychology , Farmers/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Occupational Health , Pandemics
4.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243886, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983913

ABSTRACT

Commercial fisheries globally experienced numerous and significant perturbations during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting the livelihoods of millions of fishers worldwide. In the Northeast United States, fishers grappled with low prices and disruptions to export and domestic markets, leaving many tied to the dock, while others found ways to adapt to the changing circumstances brought about by the pandemic. This paper investigates the short-term impacts of the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-June 2020) on commercial fishers in the Northeast U.S. to understand the effects of the pandemic on participation in the fishery and fishers' economic outcomes, using data collected from an online survey of 258 Northeast U.S. commercial fishers. This research also assesses characteristics of those fishers who continued fishing and their adaptive strategies to the changing circumstances. Analysis of survey responses found the majority of fishers continued fishing during the early months of the pandemic, while a significant number had stopped fishing. Nearly all reported a loss of income, largely driven by disruptions of export markets, the loss of restaurant sales, and a resulting decline in seafood prices. Landings data demonstrate that while fishing pressure in 2020 was reduced for some species, it remained on track with previous years for others. Fishers reported engaging in a number of adaptation strategies, including direct sales of seafood, switching species, and supplementing their income with government payments or other sources of income. Many fishers who had stopped fishing indicated plans to return, suggesting refraining from fishing as a short-term adaptation strategy, rather than a plan to permanently stop fishing. Despite economic losses, fishers in the Northeast U.S. demonstrated resilience in the face of the pandemic by continuing to fish and implementing other adaptation strategies rather than switching to other livelihoods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Conservation of Natural Resources/economics , Fisheries/economics , Income , Pandemics/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New England
5.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(47): 29419-29421, 2020 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-900116

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to environmental recovery in some ecosystems from a global "anthropause," yet such evidence for natural resources with extraction or production value (e.g., fisheries) is limited. This brief report provides a data-driven global snapshot of expert-perceived impacts of COVID-19 on inland fisheries. We distributed an online survey assessing perceptions of inland fishery pressures in June and July 2020 to basin-level inland fishery experts (i.e., identified by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations across the global North and South); 437 respondents from 79 countries addressed 93 unique hydrological basins, accounting for 82.1% of global inland fish catch. Based on the responses analyzed against extrinsic fish catch and human development index data, pandemic impacts on inland fisheries 1) add gradation to the largely positive environmental narrative of the global pandemic and 2) identify that basins of higher provisioning value are perceived to experience greater fishery pressures but may have limited compensatory capacity to mitigate COVID-19 impacts along with negative pressures already present.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Fisheries/economics , Pandemics/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fisheries/statistics & numerical data , Food Insecurity , Humans
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