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1.
FASEB J ; 35(9): e21870, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373669

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is often characterized by dysregulated inflammatory and immune responses. It has been shown that the Traditional Chinese Medicine formulation Qing-Fei-Pai-Du decoction (QFPDD) is effective in the treatment of the disease, especially for patients in the early stage. Our network pharmacology analyses indicated that many inflammation and immune-related molecules were the targets of the active components of QFPDD, which propelled us to examine the effects of the decoction on inflammation. We found in the present study that QFPDD effectively alleviated dextran sulfate sodium-induced intestinal inflammation in mice. It inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, and promoted the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by macrophagic cells. Further investigations found that QFPDD and one of its active components wogonoside markedly reduced LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of transcription factor ATF2, an important regulator of multiple cytokines expression. Our data revealed that both QFPDD and wogonoside decreased the half-life of ATF2 and promoted its proteasomal degradation. Of note, QFPDD and wogonoside down-regulated deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 along with inducing ATF2 degradation. Inhibition of USP14 with the small molecular inhibitor IU1 also led to the decrease of ATF2 in the cells, indicating that QFPDD and wogonoside may act through regulating USP14 to promote ATF2 degradation. To further assess the importance of ubiquitination in regulating ATF2, we generated mice that were intestinal-specific KLHL5 deficiency, a CUL3-interacting protein participating in substrate recognition of E3s. In these mice, QFPDD mitigated inflammatory reaction in the spleen, but not intestinal inflammation, suggesting CUL3-KLHL5 may function as an E3 for ATF2 degradation.


Subject(s)
Activating Transcription Factor 2/metabolism , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Flavanones/pharmacology , Glucosides/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , Proteolysis/drug effects , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/deficiency , Animals , Cell Line , Colitis/chemically induced , Colitis/drug therapy , Cullin Proteins/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Dextran Sulfate/pharmacology , Dextran Sulfate/therapeutic use , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Glucosides/therapeutic use , Inflammation/chemically induced , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/drug effects , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , Pyrroles/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/antagonists & inhibitors , Ubiquitination
2.
Cells ; 10(5)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223961

ABSTRACT

The flavonoid naringenin (Nar), present in citrus fruits and tomatoes, has been identified as a blocker of an emerging class of human intracellular channels, namely the two-pore channel (TPC) family, whose role has been established in several diseases. Indeed, Nar was shown to be effective against neoangiogenesis, a process essential for solid tumor progression, by specifically impairing TPC activity. The goal of the present review is to illustrate the rationale that links TPC channels to the mechanism of coronavirus infection, and how their inhibition by Nar could be an efficient pharmacological strategy to fight the current pandemic plague COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology , Calcium Channels/metabolism , Flavanones/pharmacology , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arabidopsis/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Endosomes/virology , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Humans , Lysosomes/drug effects , Lysosomes/metabolism , Lysosomes/virology , Neoplasms/blood supply , Neoplasms/pathology , Neovascularization, Pathologic/drug therapy , Neovascularization, Pathologic/pathology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vacuoles/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
3.
Molecules ; 26(5)2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121891

ABSTRACT

Despite the virulence and high fatality of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), no specific antiviral treatment exists until the current moment. Natural agents with immune-promoting potentials such as bee products are being explored as possible treatments. Bee honey and propolis are rich in bioactive compounds that express strong antimicrobial, bactericidal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant activities. This review examined the literature for the anti-COVID-19 effects of bee honey and propolis, with the aim of optimizing the use of these handy products as prophylactic or adjuvant treatments for people infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Molecular simulations show that flavonoids in propolis and honey (e.g., rutin, naringin, caffeic acid phenyl ester, luteolin, and artepillin C) may inhibit viral spike fusion in host cells, viral-host interactions that trigger the cytokine storm, and viral replication. Similar to the potent antiviral drug remdesivir, rutin, propolis ethanolic extract, and propolis liposomes inhibited non-structural proteins of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro, and these compounds along with naringin inhibited SARS-CoV-2 infection in Vero E6 cells. Propolis extracts delivered by nanocarriers exhibit better antiviral effects against SARS-CoV-2 than ethanolic extracts. In line, hospitalized COVID-19 patients receiving green Brazilian propolis or a combination of honey and Nigella sativa exhibited earlier viral clearance, symptom recovery, discharge from the hospital as well as less mortality than counterparts receiving standard care alone. Thus, the use of bee products as an adjuvant treatment for COVID-19 may produce beneficial effects. Implications for treatment outcomes and issues to be considered in future studies are discussed.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 , Honey , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Propolis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Clinical Trials as Topic , Flavanones/chemistry , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Nigella sativa/chemistry , Propolis/chemistry , Propolis/therapeutic use , Vero Cells
4.
Front Immunol ; 11: 570919, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976248

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Severe COVID-19 cases develop severe acute respiratory syndrome, which can result in multiple organ failure, sepsis, and death. The higher risk group includes the elderly and subjects with pre-existing chronic illnesses such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. To date, no specific treatment or vaccine is available for COVID-19. Among many compounds, naringenin (NAR) a flavonoid present in citrus fruits has been investigated for antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties like reducing viral replication and cytokine production. In this perspective, we summarize NAR potential anti-inflammatory role in COVID-19 associated risk factors and SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Phytother Res ; 34(12): 3137-3147, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969744

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, a novel flu-like coronavirus named COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) was recognized by World Health Organization. No specific treatments exist for COVID-19 at this time. New evidence suggests that therapeutic options focusing on antiviral agents may alleviate COVID-19 symptoms as well as those that lead to the decrease in the inflammatory responses. Flavonoids, as phenolic compounds, have attracted considerable attention due to their various biological properties. In this review, the promising effects and possible mechanisms of action of naringenin, a citrus-derived flavonoid, against COVID-19 were discussed. We searched PubMed/Medline, Science direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases up to March 2020 using the definitive keywords. The evidence reviewed here indicates that naringenin might exert therapeutic effects against COVID-19 through the inhibition of COVID-19 main protease, 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro), and reduction of angiotensin converting enzyme receptors activity. One of the other mechanisms by which naringenin might exert therapeutic effects against COVID-19 is, at least partly, by attenuating inflammatory responses. The antiviral activity of the flavanone naringenin against some viruses has also been reported. On the whole, the favorable effects of naringenin lead to a conclusion that naringenin may be a promising treatment strategy against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Flavanones/pharmacology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 183: 114302, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893616

ABSTRACT

Baicalein is the main active compound of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal herb with multiple pharmacological activities, including the broad anti-virus effects. In this paper, the preclinical study of baicalein on the treatment of COVID-19 was performed. Results showed that baicalein inhibited cell damage induced by SARS-CoV-2 and improved the morphology of Vero E6 cells at a concentration of 0.1 µM and above. The effective concentration could be reached after oral administration of 200 mg/kg crystal form ß of baicalein in rats. Furthermore, baicalein significantly inhibited the body weight loss, the replication of the virus, and relieved the lesions of lung tissue in hACE2 transgenic mice infected with SARS-CoV-2. In LPS-induced acute lung injury of mice, baicalein improved the respiratory function, inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung, and decreased the levels of IL-1ß and TNF-α in serum. In conclusion, oral administration of crystal form ß of baicalein could reach its effective concentration against SARS-CoV-2. Baicalein could inhibit SARS-CoV-2-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, baicalein might be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Flavanones/pharmacokinetics , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Transgenic , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Treatment Outcome , Vero Cells
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