Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 98
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Am J Case Rep ; 23: e935329, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634052

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND During the global Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have identified and monitored variants of concerns (VOCs) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). P.1 (Gamma) variant was initially identified in northern Brazil but has now spread worldwide. This is a report of a 48-year-old female resident of southern Florida with confirmed reinfection with P.1 variant 9 months following the initial infection. This patient was not immunocompromised and was not vaccinated. CASE REPORT A 48-year-old woman residing in southern Florida presented with symptoms of COVID-19 and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 with oral swab polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in September 2020. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously after 5 days. Nine months later, the patient again presented with respiratory, digestive, and constitutional symptoms. The nasopharyngeal swab SARS-CoV-2 PCR was positive. At that time, she had not received any vaccinations against SARS-CoV-2. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of viral RNA from the patient's second infection confirmed that the viral strain was P.1 variant containing the E484K spike protein substitution. CONCLUSIONS This report has identified a confirmed case of reinfection with P.1 variant of SARS-CoV-2 outside Brazil. This case supports recent epidemiological findings that indicate this VOC may have increased infectivity and virulence, and highlights the importance of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination for everyone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Reinfection , United States
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 890, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635924

ABSTRACT

The control of the initial outbreak and spread of SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 via the application of population-wide non-pharmaceutical mitigation measures have led to remarkable successes in dampening the pandemic globally. However, with countries beginning to ease or lift these measures fully to restart activities, concern is growing regarding the impacts that such reopening of societies could have on the subsequent transmission of the virus. While mathematical models of COVID-19 transmission have played important roles in evaluating the impacts of these measures for curbing virus transmission, a key need is for models that are able to effectively capture the effects of the spatial and social heterogeneities that drive the epidemic dynamics observed at the local community level. Iterative forecasting that uses new incoming epidemiological and social behavioral data to sequentially update locally-applicable transmission models can overcome this gap, potentially resulting in better predictions and policy actions. Here, we present the development of one such data-driven iterative modelling tool based on publicly available data and an extended SEIR model for forecasting SARS-CoV-2 at the county level in the United States. Using data from the state of Florida, we demonstrate the utility of such a system for exploring the outcomes of the social measures proposed by policy makers for containing the course of the pandemic. We provide comprehensive results showing how the locally identified models could be employed for accessing the impacts and societal tradeoffs of using specific social protective strategies. We conclude that it could have been possible to lift the more disruptive social interventions related to movement restriction/social distancing measures earlier if these were accompanied by widespread testing and contact tracing. These intensified social interventions could have potentially also brought about the control of the epidemic in low- and some medium-incidence county settings first, supporting the development and deployment of a geographically-phased approach to reopening the economy of Florida. We have made our data-driven forecasting system publicly available for policymakers and health officials to use in their own locales, so that a more efficient coordinated strategy for controlling SARS-CoV-2 region-wide can be developed and successfully implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Florida/epidemiology , Forecasting , Humans
3.
Cornea ; 41(2): 224-231, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625425

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of symptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection after corneal transplantation surgery, with cataract surgeries as controls, and the impact of the novel coronavirus disease pandemic in the clinical and surgical complications of corneal transplantation and cataract surgeries. METHODS: A retrospective matched case-control study of 480 consecutive individuals who underwent surgery at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between May 2020 and November 2020. A total of 240 patients who underwent corneal transplantation with tissue obtained from the Florida Lions Eye Bank were age, race, ethnicity, and sex matched with 240 patients who underwent cataract surgery during the same day and by the same surgical team. Only the first corneal transplant or cataract surgery during this period was considered for each individual. All donors and recipients were deemed SARS-CoV-2 negative by a nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction test before surgery. Postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infections were defined as previously SARS-CoV-2(-) individuals who developed symptoms or had a positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction test during the first postoperative month. RESULTS: Mean age, sex, race, and ethnicity were similar between groups. There were no differences between the corneal transplant and cataract groups in the rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection before (5.8% vs. 7.5%, P= 0.6) or after surgery (2.9% vs. 2.9%, P = 1). The rates of postoperative complications did not increase during the pandemic, compared with previously reported ranges. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection was similar for individuals undergoing corneal transplantation or cataract surgery. Further research is required to evaluate the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 through corneal tissue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cataract Extraction , Corneal Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Case-Control Studies , Eye Banks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Transplant Recipients/statistics & numerical data
4.
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care ; 33(1): 9-21, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593931

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Despite the availability of HIV prevention and treatment tools, HIV disparities continue to affect Latinx sexual minority men (LSMM). Behavioral health concerns further exacerbate HIV disparities among LSMM. This study used rapid qualitative analysis to understand factors influencing LSMM's access to HIV and behavioral health services during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Participants included LSMM with (n = 10) and without HIV (n = 10). The analysis identified 15 themes. Themes revealed that LSMM's access was disrupted by new and worsening barriers resulting from COVID-19, such as anxiety about COVID-19 exposure, confusion and disruptions to services, and new structural challenges. Other themes highlight positive changes, such as telehealth and relaxed clinic protocols, which enhanced LSMM's access to services during COVID-19. The findings suggest the need for HIV and behavioral health clinics to innovate and ensure LSMM's continued access to services during and beyond COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Florida , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Health Services , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 720180, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581131

ABSTRACT

Lack of social engagement and the resulting social isolation can have negative impacts on health and well-being, especially in senior care communities and for those living with dementia. Project VITAL leverages technology and community resources to create a network for connection, engagement, education, and support of individuals with dementia and their caregivers, and explores the impact of these interventions in reducing feelings of social isolation and increasing mood among residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through two phases, 600 personalized Wi-Fi-enabled iN2L tablets were distributed to 300 senior care communities (55% assisted living communities, 37% skilled nursing communities, 6% memory care communities, and 2% adult family-care homes) to connect and engage residents and their families. Different phases also included Project ECHO, a video-based learning platform, Alzheimer's Association virtual and online education and support for family caregivers, evidence-based online professional dementia care staff training and certification, and Virtual Forums designed to explore ways to build sustainable, scalable models to ensure access to support and decrease social isolation in the future. Tablet usage was collected over an 11-month period and an interim survey was designed to assess the effectiveness of the tablets, in preventing social isolation and increasing mood among residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 105 care community staff (whose community used the tablets) completed the survey and overall, these staff showed a high level of agreement to statements indicating that residents struggled with loneliness and mood, and that the tablet was useful in improving loneliness and mood in residents and allowing them to stay in touch with family and friends. Additional positive results were seen through a variety of other responses around the tablets and Project ECHO. Overall, the tablets were shown to be an effective way to engage residents and connect them with friends and family, as well as being a useful tool for staff members. A third phase is currently underway in the homes of people with dementia and their family caregivers, which includes tablets and direct access to Alzheimer's Association virtual and online education and support programs.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , COVID-19 , Dementia , Adult , Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , Dementia/epidemiology , Florida , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Technology
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134241, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508587

ABSTRACT

Importance: The influence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep-related hypoxemia in SARS-CoV-2 viral infection and COVID-19 outcomes remains unknown. Controversy exists regarding whether to continue treatment for SDB with positive airway pressure given concern for aerosolization with limited data to inform professional society recommendations. Objective: To investigate the association of SDB (identified via polysomnogram) and sleep-related hypoxia with (1) SARS-CoV-2 positivity and (2) World Health Organization (WHO)-designated COVID-19 clinical outcomes while accounting for confounding including obesity, underlying cardiopulmonary disease, cancer, and smoking history. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case-control study was conducted within the Cleveland Clinic Health System (Ohio and Florida) and included all patients who were tested for COVID-19 between March 8 and November 30, 2020, and who had an available sleep study record. Sleep indices and SARS-CoV-2 positivity were assessed with overlap propensity score weighting, and COVID-19 clinical outcomes were assessed using the institutional registry. Exposures: Sleep study-identified SDB (defined by frequency of apneas and hypopneas using the Apnea-Hypopnea Index [AHI]) and sleep-related hypoxemia (percentage of total sleep time at <90% oxygen saturation [TST <90]). Main Outcomes and Measures: Outcomes were SARS-CoV-2 infection and WHO-designated COVID-19 clinical outcomes (hospitalization, use of supplemental oxygen, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and death). Results: Of 350 710 individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2, 5402 (mean [SD] age, 56.4 [14.5] years; 3005 women [55.6%]) had a prior sleep study, of whom 1935 (35.8%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Of the 5402 participants, 1696 were Black (31.4%), 3259 were White (60.3%), and 822 were of other race or ethnicity (15.2%). Patients who were positive vs negative for SARS-CoV-2 had a higher AHI score (median, 16.2 events/h [IQR, 6.1-39.5 events/h] vs 13.6 events/h [IQR, 5.5-33.6 events/h]; P < .001) and increased TST <90 (median, 1.8% sleep time [IQR, 0.10%-12.8% sleep time] vs 1.4% sleep time [IQR, 0.10%-10.8% sleep time]; P = .02). After overlap propensity score-weighted logistic regression, no SDB measures were associated with SARS-CoV-2 positivity. Median TST <90 was associated with the WHO-designated COVID-19 ordinal clinical outcome scale (adjusted odds ratio, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.10-1.74; P = .005). Time-to-event analyses showed sleep-related hypoxia associated with a 31% higher rate of hospitalization and mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08-1.57; P = .005). Conclusions and Relevance: In this case-control study, SDB and sleep-related hypoxia were not associated with increased SARS-CoV-2 positivity; however, once patients were infected with SARS-CoV-2, sleep-related hypoxia was an associated risk factor for detrimental COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cause of Death , Hospitalization , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/complications , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Florida , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoxia , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Ohio , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/pathology , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/therapy
8.
Am J Public Health ; 111(S3): S201-S203, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496722

ABSTRACT

Structural racism is a root cause of poor health in the United States and underlies COVID-19-related disparities for Black and Latinx populations. We describe how one community-based organization responded to structural racism and COVID-19 in Florida. Informed by the literature on how public health practice changed from emphasizing prevention (Public Health 1.0) to collaboration between governmental and public health agencies (Public Health 2.0) and examining social determinants of health (Public Health 3.0), we call for a politically engaged Public Health 4.0. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(S3):S201-S203. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306408).


Subject(s)
African Americans/ethnology , COVID-19/economics , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Public Health , Racism/ethnology , Florida , Humans , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Social Determinants of Health , United States
9.
Cell Transplant ; 30: 9636897211053872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477154

ABSTRACT

The 28th American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR) returned to the Sheraton Sand Key in Clearwater Beach, Florida after an 18 month hiatus. Like nearly all conferences during the pandemic, the ASNTR conference was held in person while offering a virtual option to the event. These formats are advantageous for those under travel restrictions or personal constraints, but they lack the spontaneity of in-person connections. Highlights from the meeting included the return of the Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award and the Roy Bakay Memorial lecture. The presidential lecture was given by Gabriel de Erausquin, who discussed the possibility of long-term CNS effects resulting from SARS-CoV2 infection. With both virtual and in-person events, including oral and poster presentations, the ASNTR managed to maintain the unique essence of this small important meeting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Congresses as Topic , Cell Transplantation , Florida , Humans , Hydrogels , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neurodegenerative Diseases/therapy , Neurons/pathology , Neurons/physiology , Neuropathology/methods , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Telecommunications , United States
10.
J Clin Microbiol ; 59(10): e0110721, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430157

ABSTRACT

The reported sensitivity of rapid, antigen-based diagnostics for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection varies. Few studies have evaluated rapid antigen tests in real-world settings or among large populations. Beginning October 2020, Florida offered individuals presenting for SARS-CoV-2 testing PCR testing if they tested positive by the Abbott BinaxNOW COVID-19 antigen (Ag) card, were symptomatic, or required or requested PCR testing. We compared results among individuals who received both types of tests at four publicly accessible testing sites across Florida. We calculated the positive percent agreement (PPA) between the two test types by symptom status. Subsequently, we evaluated the PPA among individuals regardless of symptoms with lower cycle threshold values (<30). Overall, 18,457 individuals were tested via both methods, of which 3,153 (17.1%) were positive by PCR. The PPA for the Abbott BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag card using the PCR comparator was 49.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47.4% to 50.9%). Among symptomatic individuals the PPA was 51.9% (95% CI, 49.7% to 54.0%). When restricted to positive PCR tests with a cycle threshold value of <30, regardless of symptom status, the PPA was 75.3% (95% CI, 72.8% to 77.6%). The PPA of the Abbott BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag card compared with PCR was lower than that previously reported. Our findings may reflect the performance of the BinaxNOW antigen test in real-world settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antigens, Viral , COVID-19 Testing , Florida , Humans , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity
11.
Public Health Rep ; 136(6): 782-790, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374029

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 mortality varies across demographic groups at the national level, but little is known about potential differences in COVID-19 mortality across states. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of all-cause excess deaths associated with COVID-19 in Florida and Ohio overall and by sex, age, and race. METHODS: We calculated the number of weekly and cumulative excess deaths among adults aged ≥20 from March 15 through December 5, 2020, in Florida and Ohio as the observed number of deaths less the expected number of deaths, adjusted for population, secular trends, and seasonality. We based our estimates on death certificate data from the previous 10 years. RESULTS: The results were based on ratios of observed-to-expected deaths. The ratios were 1.17 (95% prediction interval, 1.14-1.21) in Florida and 1.15 (95% prediction interval, 1.11-1.19) in Ohio. Although the largest number of excess deaths occurred in the oldest age groups, in both states the ratios of observed-to-expected deaths were highest among adults aged 20-49 (1.21; 95% prediction interval, 1.11-1.32). The ratio of observed-to-expected deaths for the Black population was especially elevated in Florida. CONCLUSIONS: Although excess deaths were largely concentrated among older cohorts, the high ratios of observed-to-expected deaths among younger age groups indicate widespread effects of COVID-19. The high levels of observed-to-expected deaths among Black adults may reflect in part disparities in infection rates, preexisting conditions, and access to care. The finding of high excess deaths among Black adults deserves further attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Health Status , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Ohio/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; 64(8): 885-901, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373516

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disproportionately affects nursing home residents, resulting in an elevated risk for COVID-19 morbidity and mortality for this frail population. It is critical to understand whether nursing home quality is related to COVID-19 cases and deaths. Using publicly available data obtained from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services COVID-19 Nursing Home Dataset, Nursing Home Compare and Long-Term Care Focus, this study compares key nursing home characteristics, infection prevention and control deficiencies, and five-star ratings among Florida nursing homes with and without resident COVID-19 cases and deaths. The study further examines the association between facility and resident characteristics, quality indicators, and COVID-19 cases and deaths. Findings from our study indicate that through late October 2020, over 90% of Florida nursing homes have at least one resident case and 65% have at least one resident death. The likelihood of having COVID-19 cases is more related to ownership status, facility size and average occupancy rate, rather than quality indicators. Associations between infection prevention and control deficiencies, overall quality ratings, and presence of COVID-19 resident deaths varied across different phases of the pandemic (e.g., overall five-star rating was found related to the odds of having resident deaths after, but not during, the surging stage). Training, uptake, and adherence to infection control procedures are needed to better protect the vulnerable nursing home resident population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Florida , Humans , Medicare , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
14.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1314, 2021 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has accelerated interest in and need for online delivery of healthcare. We examined the reach, engagement and effectiveness of online delivery of lifestyle change programs (LCP) modelled after the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) in a multistate, real-world setting. METHODS: Longitudinal, non-randomized study comparing online and in-person LCP in a large multistate sample delivered over 1 year. Sample included at-risk adults (n = 26,743) referred to online (n = 9) and in-person (n = 11) CDC-recognized LCP from a multi-state registry (California, Florida and Colorado) between 2015 and 2018. The main outcome was effectiveness (proportion achieving > 5% weight loss) at one-year. Our secondary outcomes included reach (proportion enrolled among referred) and engagement (proportion ≥ 9 sessions by week 26). We used logistic regression modelling to assess the association between participant- and setting -level characteristics with meaningful weight loss. RESULTS: Online LCP effectiveness was lower, with 23% of online participants achieving > 5% weight loss, compared with 35% of in-person participants (p < 0.001). More adults referred to online programs enrolled (56% vs 51%, p < 0.001), but fewer engaged at 6-months (attendance at ≥9 sessions 46% vs 66%, p < 0.001) compared to in-person participants. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to adults referred to in-person LCP, those referred to online LCP were more likely to enroll and less likely to engage. Online participants achieved modest meaningful weight loss. Online delivery of LCP is an attractive strategy to deliver and scale DPP, particularly with social distancing measures currently in place. However, it is unclear how to optimize delivery models for maximal impact given trade-offs in reach and effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Weight Reduction Programs , Adult , Colorado , Florida , Humans , Life Style , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(7): 983-988, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320076

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic led to disruptions in operative and hospital capabilities as the country triaged resources and canceled elective procedures. This study details the operative experience of a safety-net hospital for cancer-related operations during a 3-month period at the height of the pandemic. METHODS: Patients operated on for or diagnosed with malignancies of the abdomen, breast, skin, or soft-tissue (September 3, 2020-September 6, 2020) were identified from operative/clinic schedules. Sociodemographics, tumor and treatment characteristics, and COVID-19 information was identified through retrospective chart review of a prospectively maintained database. Descriptive statistics were calculated. RESULTS: Fifty patients evaluated within this window underwent oncologic surgery. Median age was 61 (interquartile range: 53-68), 56% were female, 86% were White, and 66% were Hispanic. The majority (28%) were for colon cancer. Only two patients tested positive for COVID-19 preoperatively or within 30 days of their operation. There were no mortalities during the 1-year study period. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many hospitals and operative centers limited interventions to preserve resources, but oncologic procedures continued at many large-volume academic cancer centers. This study underscores the importance of continuing to offer surgery during the pandemic for surgical oncology cases at safety-net hospitals to minimize delays in time-sensitive oncologic treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Hospitals, High-Volume/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Safety-net Providers/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Oncology
17.
Am J Manag Care ; 27(6): 234-240, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289744

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine (1) factors linked to hospitalizations among managed care patients (MCPs), (2) outcome improvement with use of outpatient off-label treatment, and (3) outcome comparison between MCPs and a mirror group. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study comparing MCPs with an age- and gender-matched mirror group in Florida from April 1, 2020, to May 31, 2020. METHODS: A total of 38,193 MCPs in a Florida primary care group were monitored for COVID-19 incidence, hospitalization, and mortality. The highest-risk patients were managed by the medical group's COVID-19 Task Force. As part of a population health program, the COVID-19 Task Force contacted patients, conducted medical encounters, and tracked data including comorbidities and medical outcomes. The MCPs enrolled in the medical group were compared with a mirror group from the state of Florida. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age among the MCPs was 67.9 (15.2) years, and 60% were female. Older age and hypertension were the most important factors in predicting COVID-19. Obesity, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and congestive heart failure (CHF) were linked to higher rates of hospitalizations. Patients prescribed off-label outpatient medications had 73% lower likelihood of hospitalization (P < .05). Compared with the mirror group, MCPs had 60% lower COVID-19 mortality (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: MCPs have risk factors similar to the general population for COVID-19 incidence and progression, including older age, hypertension, obesity, CHF, and CKD. Outpatient treatment with off-label medicines decreased hospitalizations. A comprehensive population health program decreased COVID-19 mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Managed Care Programs/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Off-Label Use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 32(2): 598-606, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268210

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine's Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program (NeighborhoodHELP) initiated a longitudinal assessment and mitigation of social and health care challenges for a population of approximately 850 underserved households. Here, we describe the needs assessment, ensuing interventions, and lessons learned during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , Vulnerable Populations , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Community Health Services , Consumer Health Information , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Food Assistance , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Male , Medically Underserved Area , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Social Determinants of Health , Young Adult
20.
N Engl J Med ; 384(23): 2252-2253, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263528
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...