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1.
Anal Chem ; 94(18): 6703-6710, 2022 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815468

ABSTRACT

Ratiometric assays of label-free dual-signaling reporters with enzyme-free amplification are intriguing yet challenging. Herein, yellow- and red-silver nanocluster (yH-AgNC and rH-AgNC) acting as bicolor ratiometric emitters are guided to site-specifically cluster in two template signaling hairpins (yH and rH), respectively, and originally, both of them are almost non-fluorescent. The predesigned complement tethered in yH is recognizable to a DNA trigger (TOC) related to SARS-CoV-2. With the help of an enhancer strand (G15E) tethering G-rich bases (G15) and a linker strand (LS), a switchable DNA construct is assembled via their complementary hybridizing with yH and rH, in which the harbored yH-AgNC close to G15 is lighted-up. Upon introducing TOC, its affinity ligating with yH is further implemented to unfold rH and induce the DNA construct switching into closed conformation, causing TOC-repeatable recycling amplification through competitive strand displacement. Consequently, the harbored rH-AgNC is also placed adjacent to G15 for turning on its red fluorescence, while the yH-AgNC is retainable. As demonstrated, the intensity ratio dependent on varying TOC is reliable with high sensitivity down to 0.27 pM. By lighting-up dual-cluster emitters using one G15 enhancer, it would be promising to exploit a simpler ratiometric biosensing format for bioassays or clinical theranostics.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , Metal Nanoparticles , COVID-19/diagnosis , DNA , Fluorescence , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Silver , Spectrometry, Fluorescence
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 3539, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730309

ABSTRACT

Microfluidics has emerged rapidly over the past 20 years and has been investigated for a variety of applications from life sciences to environmental monitoring. Although continuous-flow microfluidics is ubiquitous, segmented-flow or droplet microfluidics offers several attractive features. Droplets can be independently manipulated and analyzed with very high throughput. Typically, microfluidics is carried out within planar networks of microchannels, namely, microfluidic chips. We propose that fibers offer an interesting alternative format with key advantages for enhanced optical coupling. Herein, we demonstrate the generation of monodisperse droplets within a uniaxial optofluidic Lab-in-a-Fiber scheme. We combine droplet microfluidics with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection achieved through the development of an optical side-coupling fiber, which we term a periscope fiber. This arrangement provides stable and compact alignment. Laser-induced fluorescence offers high sensitivity and low detection limits with a rapid response time making it an attractive detection method for in situ real-time measurements. We use the well-established fluorophore, fluorescein, to characterize the Lab-in-a-Fiber device and determine the generation of [Formula: see text] 0.9 nL droplets. We present characterization data of a range of fluorescein concentrations, establishing a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 nM fluorescein. Finally, we show that the device operates within a realistic and relevant fluorescence regime by detecting reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) products in the context of COVID-19 diagnostics. The device represents a step towards the development of a point-of-care droplet digital RT-LAMP platform.


Subject(s)
Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Viruses/isolation & purification , Fluorescence , Lasers
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0262149, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677576

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need for better diagnostic and analytical methods for vaccine research and infection control in virology. This has been highlighted by recently emerging viral epidemics and pandemics (Zika, SARS-CoV-2), and recurring viral outbreaks like the yellow fever outbreaks in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo (2016) and in Brazil (2016-2018). Current assays to determine neutralising activity against viral infections in sera are costly in time and equipment and suffer from high variability. Therefore, both basic infection research and diagnostic population screenings would benefit from improved methods to determine virus-neutralising activity in patient samples. Here we describe a robust, objective, and scalable Fluorescence Reduction Neutralisation Test (FluoRNT) for yellow fever virus, relying on flow cytometric detection of cells infected with a fluorescent Venus reporter containing variant of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D (YF-17D-Venus). It accurately measures neutralising antibody titres in human serum samples within as little as 24 h. Samples from 32 vaccinees immunised with YF-17D were tested for neutralising activity by both a conventional focus reduction neutralisation test (FRNT) and FluoRNT. Both types of tests proved to be equally reliable for the detection of neutralising activity, however, FluoRNT is significantly more precise and reproducible with a greater dynamic range than conventional FRNT. The FluoRNT assay protocol is substantially faster, easier to control, and cheaper in per-assay costs. FluoRNT additionally reduces handling time minimising exposure of personnel to patient samples. FluoRNT thus brings a range of desirable features that can accelerate and standardise the measurement of neutralising anti-yellow fever virus antibodies. It could be used in applications ranging from vaccine testing to large cohort studies in systems virology and vaccinology. We also anticipate the potential to translate the methodology and analysis of FluoRNT to other flaviviruses such as West Nile, Dengue and Zika or to RNA viruses more generally.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Yellow Fever/immunology , Yellow fever virus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Fluorescence , Humans , Neutralization Tests/economics , Neutralization Tests/methods , Vero Cells , Yellow Fever/blood , Yellow Fever/virology
4.
J Emerg Med ; 62(3): 337-341, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At least 115,000 health and care workers (HCWs) are estimated to have lost their lives to COVID-19, according to the the chief of the World Health Organization (WHO). Personal protective equipment (PPE) is the first line of defense for HCWs against infectious diseases. At the height of the pandemic, PPE supplies became scarce, necessitating reuse, which increased the occupational COVID-19 risks to HCWs. Currently, there are few robust studies addressing PPE reuse and practice variability, leaving HCWs vulnerable to accidental contamination and harm. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess potential HCW contamination during PPE donning, doffing, and reuse. METHODS: The study included 28 active acute care physicians, nurses, and nurse practitioners that evaluated 5 simulated patients with COVID-like symptoms while donning and doffing PPE between each patient encounter. An N95 mask was contaminated with a transparent fluorescent gel applied to the outside of the N95 mask to simulate contamination that might occur during reuse. Participants were evaluated after PPE doffing for each encounter using a black light to assess for face and body contamination. RESULTS: All participants had multiple sites of contamination, predominantly on their head and neck. None of the participants were able to don and doff PPE without contaminating themselves during five consecutive simulation cycles. CONCLUSIONS: The current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PPE guidelines for donning and doffing fall short in protecting HCWs. They do not adequately protect HCWs from contamination. There is an urgent need for PPE and workflow redesign.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fluorescence , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
5.
Br J Radiol ; 95(1129): 20210835, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575206

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a barrier shield in reducing droplet transmission and its effect on image quality and radiation dose in an interventional suite. METHODS: A human cough droplet visualisation model in a supine position was developed to assess efficacy of barrier shield in reducing environmental contamination. Its effect on image quality (resolution and contrast) was evaluated via image quality test phantom. Changes in the radiation dose to patient post-shield utilisation was measured. RESULTS: Use of the shield prevented escape of visible fluorescent cough droplets from the containment area. No subjective change in line-pair resolution was observed. No significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio was measured. Radiation dosage to patient was increased; this is predominantly attributed to the increased air gap and not the physical properties of the shield. CONCLUSION: Use of the barrier shield provided an effective added layer of personal protection in the interventional radiology theatre for aerosol generating procedures. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: This is the first time a human supine cough droplet visualisation has been developed. While multiple types of barrier shields have been described, this is the first systematic practical evaluation of a barrier shield designed for use in the interventional radiology theatre.


Subject(s)
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Protective Devices , Radiology, Interventional/instrumentation , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Cough , Equipment Design , Fluorescence , Humans , Male , Phantoms, Imaging , Radiation Dosage , Signal-To-Noise Ratio , Supine Position
6.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 4361844, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523091

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an enveloped RNA virus first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is impacting healthcare worldwide. Patients who develop coagulopathy have worse outcomes. The pathophysiology of COVID-19 suggests a strong interplay between hemostasis and immune cells, especially neutrophils. Our purpose was to assess neutrophil fluorescence as a potential biomarker of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with COVID-acute respiratory distress syndrome (COVID-ARDS). Sixty-one patients with COVID-ARDS admitted to the four intensive care units (ICUs) of a French general hospital were included in this prospective study. Neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring neutrophil fluorescence (NEUT-Side Fluorescence Light, NEUT-SFL) with a specific fluorescent dye staining analyzed by a routine automated flow cytometer Sysmex XN-3000™ (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan). DVT was diagnosed by complete duplex ultrasound (CDU). We found that NEUT-SFL was elevated on admission in patients with COVID-ARDS (49.76 AU, reference value 46.40 AU, p < 0.001), but did not differ between patients with DVT (49.99 AU) and those without (49.52 AU, p = 0.555). NEUT-SFL is elevated in patients with COVID-ARDS, reflecting neutrophil activation, but cannot be used as a marker of thrombosis. Because neutrophils are at interface between immune response and hemostasis through release of neutrophil extracellular traps, monitoring their activation could be an interesting approach to improve our management of coagulopathy during COVID-ARDS. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of COVID-19 and identify high-performance biomarkers.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/chemistry , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Female , Flow Cytometry/methods , Fluorescence , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/virology
8.
Antiviral Res ; 195: 105183, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458592

ABSTRACT

The likelihood of continued circulation of COVID-19 and its variants, and novel coronaviruses due to future zoonotic transmissions, combined with the current paucity of coronavirus antivirals, emphasize the need for improved screening in developing effective antivirals for the treatment of infection by SARS-CoV-2 (CoV2) and other coronaviruses. Here we report the development of a live-cell based assay for evaluating the intracellular function of the critical, highly-conserved CoV2 target, the Main 3C-like protease (Mpro). This assay is based on expression of native wild-type mature CoV2 Mpro, the function of which is quantitatively evaluated in living cells through cleavage of a biosensor leading to loss of fluorescence. Evaluation does not require cell harvesting, allowing for multiple measurements from the same cells facilitating quantification of Mpro inhibition, as well as recovery of function upon removal of inhibitory drugs. The pan-coronavirus Mpro inhibitor, GC376, was utilized in this assay and effective inhibition of intracellular CoV2 Mpro was found to be consistent with levels required to inhibit CoV2 infection of human lung cells. We demonstrate that GC376 is an effective inhibitor of intracellular CoV2 Mpro at low micromolar levels, while other predicted Mpro inhibitors, bepridil and alverine, are not. Results indicate this system can provide a highly effective high-throughput coronavirus Mpro screening system.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Sulfonic Acids/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Fluorescence , HEK293 Cells , Humans
9.
Mikrochim Acta ; 188(10): 352, 2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432545

ABSTRACT

Extracellular ATP as a purinergic signaling molecule, together with ATP receptor, are playing an important role in tumor growth, therapy resistance, and host immunity suppression. Meanwhile ATP is a crucial indicator for cellular energy status and viability, thus a vital variable for tissue regeneration and in vitro tissue engineering. Most recent studies on COVID-19 virus suggest infection caused ATP deficit and release as a major characterization at the early stage of the disease and major causes for disease complications. Thus, imaging ATP molecule in both cellular and extracellular contexts has many applications in biology, engineering, and clinics. A sensitive and selective fluorescence "signal-on" probe for ATP detection was constructed, based on the base recognition between a black hole quencher (BHQ)-labeled aptamer oligonucleotide and a fluorophore (Cy5)-labeled reporter flare. The probe was able to detect ATP in solution with single digit µM detection limit. With the assistance of lipofectamine, this probe efficiently entered and shined in the model cells U2OS within 3 h. Further application of the probe in specific scenery, cardio-tissue engineering, was also tested where the ATP aptamer complex was able to sense cellular ATP status in a semi-quantitative manner, representing a novel approach for selection of functional cardiomyocytes for tissue engineering. At last a slight change in probe configuration in which a flexible intermolecular A14 linker was introduced granted regeneration capability. These data support the application of this probe in multiple circumstances where ATP measurement or imaging is on demand.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/analysis , Aptamers, Nucleotide , Carbocyanines , Fluorescent Dyes , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Cell Line , Fluorescence , Humans , Myocytes, Cardiac , Rats
10.
Chem Commun (Camb) ; 57(79): 10222-10225, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408635

ABSTRACT

We developed a one-minute, one-step SARS-CoV-2 antigen assay based on protein-induced fluorescence enhancement of a DNA aptamer. The system showed significant selectivity and sensitivity towards both nucleocapsid protein and SARS-CoV-2 virus lysate, but with marked improvements in speed and manufacturability. We hence propose this platform as a mix-and-read testing strategy for SARS-CoV-2 that can be applied to POC diagnostics in clinical settings, especially in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/chemistry , Aptamers, Nucleotide/chemistry , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Assay , Carbocyanines/chemistry , Fluorescence , Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/chemistry
11.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(14): 5413-5424, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387160

ABSTRACT

Methods for tracking RNA inside living cells without perturbing their natural interactions and functions are critical within biology and, in particular, to facilitate studies of therapeutic RNA delivery. We present a stealth labeling approach that can efficiently, and with high fidelity, generate RNA transcripts, through enzymatic incorporation of the triphosphate of tCO, a fluorescent tricyclic cytosine analogue. We demonstrate this by incorporation of tCO in up to 100% of the natural cytosine positions of a 1.2 kb mRNA encoding for the histone H2B fused to GFP (H2B:GFP). Spectroscopic characterization of this mRNA shows that the incorporation rate of tCO is similar to cytosine, which allows for efficient labeling and controlled tuning of labeling ratios for different applications. Using live cell confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, we show that the tCO-labeled mRNA is efficiently translated into H2B:GFP inside human cells. Hence, we not only develop the use of fluorescent base analogue labeling of nucleic acids in live-cell microscopy but also, importantly, show that the resulting transcript is translated into the correct protein. Moreover, the spectral properties of our transcripts and their translation product allow for their straightforward, simultaneous visualization in live cells. Finally, we find that chemically transfected tCO-labeled RNA, unlike a state-of-the-art fluorescently labeled RNA, gives rise to expression of a similar amount of protein as its natural counterpart, hence representing a methodology for studying natural, unperturbed processing of mRNA used in RNA therapeutics and in vaccines, like the ones developed against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Fluorescence , Fluorescent Dyes/analysis , Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry , Molecular Imaging , RNA, Messenger/analysis , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line, Tumor , Cytosine/analogs & derivatives , Cytosine/analysis , Cytosine/chemical synthesis , Cytosine/chemistry , Fluorescent Dyes/chemical synthesis , Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Molecular Structure , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/therapeutic use , Spectrometry, Fluorescence
12.
Viruses ; 12(12)2020 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389520

ABSTRACT

Aptamers are short fragments of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA that have the ability to bind selected proteins with high specificity and affinity. These properties allow them to be used as an element of biosensors for the detection of specific proteins, including viral ones, which makes it possible to design valuable diagnostic tools. The influenza virus causes a huge number of human and animal deaths worldwide every year, and contributes to remarkable economic losses. In addition, in 2020, a new threat appeared-the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic. Both disease entities, especially in the initial stage of infection, are almost identical in terms of signs and symptoms. Therefore, a diagnostic solution is needed that will allow distinguishing between both pathogens, with high sensitivity and specificity; it should be cheap, quick and possible to use in the field, for example, in a doctor's office. All the mentioned properties are met by aptasensors in which the detection elements are specific aptamers. We present here the latest developments in the construction of various types of aptasensors for the detection of influenza virus. Aptasensor operation is based on the measurement of changes in electric impedance, fluorescence or electric signal (impedimetric, fluorescence and electrochemical aptasensors, respectively); it allows both qualitative and quantitative determinations. The particularly high advancement for detecting of influenza virus concerns impedimetric aptasensors.


Subject(s)
Aptamers, Nucleotide/therapeutic use , Biosensing Techniques , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Orthomyxoviridae/isolation & purification , Aptamers, Nucleotide/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , Electric Impedance , Electrochemical Techniques , Fluorescence , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 12(50): 55614-55623, 2020 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387129

ABSTRACT

Multiplexed detection of viral nucleic acids is important for rapid screening of viral infection. In this study, we present a molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheet-modified dendrimer droplet microarray (DMA) for rapid and sensitive detection of retroviral nucleic acids of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus-2 (HIV-2) simultaneously. The DMA platform was fabricated by omniphobic-omniphilic patterning on a surface-grafted dendrimer substrate. Functionalized MoS2 nanosheets modified with fluorescent dye-labeled oligomer probes were prepatterned on positively charged amino-modified omniphilic spots to form a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensing microarray. With the formation of separated microdroplets of sample on the hydrophobic-hydrophilic micropattern, prepatterned oligomer probes specifically hybridized with the target HIV genes and detached from the MoS2 nanosheet surface due to weakening of the adsorption force, leading to fluorescence signal recovery. As a proof of concept, we used this microarray with a small sample size (<150 nL) for simultaneous detection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 nucleic acids with a limit of detection (LOD) of 50 pM. The multiplex detection capability was further demonstrated for simultaneous detection of five viral genes (HIV-1, HIV-2, ORFlab, and N genes of SARS-COV-2 and M gene of Influenza A). This work demonstrated the potential of this novel MoS2-DMA FRET sensing platform for high-throughput multiplexed viral nucleic acid screening.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19/diagnosis , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV/isolation & purification , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Disulfides/chemistry , Fluorescence , Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer , HIV/pathogenicity , HIV Infections/genetics , HIV Infections/virology , Humans , Molybdenum/chemistry , Nanostructures/chemistry , Nucleic Acids/genetics , Nucleic Acids/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
15.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(34): 40342-40353, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366784

ABSTRACT

Sensitive point-of-care methods for detecting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antigens in clinical specimens are urgently needed to achieve rapid screening of viral infection. We developed a magnetic quantum dot-based dual-mode lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) biosensor for the high-sensitivity simultaneous detection of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) antigens, which is beneficial for improving the detection accuracy and efficiency of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the point-of-care testing area. A high-performance magnetic quantum dot with a triple-QD shell (MagTQD) nanotag was first fabricated and integrated into the LFIA system to provide superior fluorescence signals, enrichment ability, and detectability for S/NP antigen testing. Two detection modes were provided by the proposed MagTQD-LFIA. The direct mode was used for rapid screening or urgent detection of suspected samples within 10 min, and the enrichment mode was used for the highly sensitive and quantitative analysis of SARS-CoV-2 antigens in biological samples without the interference of the "hook effect." The simultaneous detection of SARS-CoV-2 S/NP antigens was conducted in one LFIA strip, and the detection limits for two antigens under direct and enrichment modes were 1 and 0.5 pg/mL, respectively. The MagTQD-LFIA showed high accuracy, specificity, and stability in saliva and nasal swab samples and is an efficient tool with flexibility to meet the testing requirements for SARS-CoV-2 antigens in various situations.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/analysis , Biosensing Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/analysis , Antibodies, Immobilized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Fluorescence , Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry , Humans , Immunoassay/methods , Limit of Detection , Magnetite Nanoparticles/chemistry , Nasopharynx/virology , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Quantum Dots/chemistry , Saliva/virology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
16.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(30): 11544-11553, 2021 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319014

ABSTRACT

Exponential molecular amplification such as the polymerase chain reaction is a powerful tool that allows ultrasensitive biodetection. Here, we report a new exponential amplification strategy based on photoredox autocatalysis, where eosin Y, a photocatalyst, amplifies itself by activating a nonfluorescent eosin Y derivative (EYH3-) under green light. The deactivated photocatalyst is stable and rapidly activated under low-intensity light, making the eosin Y amplification suitable for resource-limited settings. Through steady-state kinetic studies and reaction modeling, we found that EYH3- is either oxidized to eosin Y via one-electron oxidation by triplet eosin Y and subsequent 1e-/H+ transfer, or activated by singlet oxygen with the risk of degradation. By reducing the rate of the EYH3- degradation, we successfully improved EYH3--to-eosin Y recovery, achieving efficient autocatalytic eosin Y amplification. Additionally, to demonstrate its flexibility in output signals, we coupled the eosin Y amplification with photoinduced chromogenic polymerization, enabling sensitive visual detection of analytes. Finally, we applied the exponential amplification methods in developing bioassays for detection of biomarkers including SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein, an antigen used in the diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/analysis , Eosine Yellowish-(YS)/analogs & derivatives , Spectrometry, Fluorescence/methods , 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine/chemistry , Biomarkers/chemistry , Catalysis/radiation effects , Eosine Yellowish-(YS)/chemical synthesis , Eosine Yellowish-(YS)/radiation effects , Fluorescence , Light , Limit of Detection , Oxidation-Reduction/radiation effects , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry , Polymerization , Proof of Concept Study , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry
17.
Virol J ; 18(1): 146, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309916

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Favipiravir is used in treatment of Covid-19 patients. We aimed to share of ocular surface fluorescence in a patient after Favipiravir treatment in this case report. CASE PRESENTATION: A 20-year-old male patient declared no known systemic disease prior to Covid-19. He applied to us with blurry vision and blue light reflection after Covid-19 treatment with Favipiravir. We observed bilateral fluorescence on his eyes and fluorescence of his nails. Biomicroscopic examination was insignificant. CONCLUSION: We investigated the fluorescence of favipiravir tablets under ultraviolet light. Drug demonstrated fluorescence. We recorded the favipiravir fluorescence in-vitro. This appears to be a strong evidence in terms of the linkage between the fluorescence of the ocular surface and favipiravir.


Subject(s)
Amides/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Eye/chemistry , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Adult , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Eye/virology , Fluorescence , Humans , Male , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
18.
Biochem J ; 478(13): 2445-2464, 2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290093

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a coronavirus that emerged in 2019 and rapidly spread across the world causing a deadly pandemic with tremendous social and economic costs. Healthcare systems worldwide are under great pressure, and there is an urgent need for effective antiviral treatments. The only currently approved antiviral treatment for COVID-19 is remdesivir, an inhibitor of viral genome replication. SARS-CoV-2 proliferation relies on the enzymatic activities of the non-structural proteins (nsp), which makes them interesting targets for the development of new antiviral treatments. With the aim to identify novel SARS-CoV-2 antivirals, we have purified the exoribonuclease/methyltransferase (nsp14) and its cofactor (nsp10) and developed biochemical assays compatible with high-throughput approaches to screen for exoribonuclease inhibitors. We have screened a library of over 5000 commercial compounds and identified patulin and aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) as inhibitors of nsp14 exoribonuclease in vitro. We found that patulin and ATA inhibit replication of SARS-CoV-2 in a VERO E6 cell-culture model. These two new antiviral compounds will be valuable tools for further coronavirus research as well as potentially contributing to new therapeutic opportunities for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Exoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Aurintricarboxylic Acid/pharmacology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Enzyme Assays , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Fluorescence , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Patulin/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Vero Cells , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism
19.
Biochem J ; 478(13): 2465-2479, 2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290092

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for COVID-19, a human disease that has caused over 2 million deaths, stretched health systems to near-breaking point and endangered economies of countries and families around the world. Antiviral treatments to combat COVID-19 are currently lacking. Remdesivir, the only antiviral drug approved for the treatment of COVID-19, can affect disease severity, but better treatments are needed. SARS-CoV-2 encodes 16 non-structural proteins (nsp) that possess different enzymatic activities with important roles in viral genome replication, transcription and host immune evasion. One key aspect of host immune evasion is performed by the uridine-directed endoribonuclease activity of nsp15. Here we describe the expression and purification of nsp15 recombinant protein. We have developed biochemical assays to follow its activity, and we have found evidence for allosteric behaviour. We screened a custom chemical library of over 5000 compounds to identify nsp15 endoribonuclease inhibitors, and we identified and validated NSC95397 as an inhibitor of nsp15 endoribonuclease in vitro. Although NSC95397 did not inhibit SARS-CoV-2 growth in VERO E6 cells, further studies will be required to determine the effect of nsp15 inhibition on host immune evasion.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Endoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Allosteric Regulation , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endoribonucleases/isolation & purification , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Enzyme Assays , Fluorescence , High-Throughput Screening Assays , In Vitro Techniques , Kinetics , Naphthoquinones/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Solutions , Vero Cells , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/isolation & purification , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
20.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(12)2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282573

ABSTRACT

The consumption of water and food contaminated by pathogens is a major cause of numerous diseases and deaths globally. To control pathogen contamination and reduce the risk of illness, a system is required that can quickly detect and monitor target pathogens. We developed a simple and reproducible strategy, termed three-way junction (3WJ)-induced transcription amplification, to detect target nucleic acids by rationally combining 3WJ-induced isothermal amplification with a light-up RNA aptamer. In principle, the presence of the target nucleic acid generates a large number of light-up RNA aptamers (Spinach aptamers) through strand displacement and transcription amplification for 2 h at 37 °C. The resulting Spinach RNA aptamers specifically bind to fluorogens such as 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone and emit a highly enhanced fluorescence signal, which is clearly distinguished from the signal emitted in the absence of the target nucleic acid. With the proposed strategy, concentrations of target nucleic acids selected from the genome of Salmonellaenterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) were quantitatively determined with high selectivity. In addition, the practical applicability of the method was demonstrated by performing spike-and-recovery experiments with S. Typhi in human serum.


Subject(s)
Aptamers, Nucleotide , Biosensing Techniques , Nucleic Acids , Bacteria , Fluorescence , Humans , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Spinacia oleracea/genetics
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