Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.622
Filter
1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 918896, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198845

ABSTRACT

Background: Effective and safe vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are critical to controlling the COVID-19 pandemic and will remain the most important tool in limiting the spread of the virus long after the pandemic is over. Methods: We bring pioneering contributions on the maintenance of the immune response over a year on a real-life basis study in 1,587 individuals (18-90 yrs, median 39 yrs; 1,208 female/379 male) who underwent vaccination with two doses of CoronaVac and BNT162b2 booster after 6-months of primary protocol. Findings: Elevated levels of anti-spike IgG antibodies were detected after CoronaVac vaccination, which significantly decreased after 80 days and remained stable until the introduction of the booster dose. Heterologous booster restored antibody titers up to-1·7-fold, changing overall seropositivity to 96%. Titers of neutralising antibodies to the Omicron variant were lower in all timepoints than those against Delta variant. Individuals presenting neutralising antibodies against Omicron also presented the highest titers against Delta and anti-Spike IgG. Cellular immune response measurement pointed out a mixed immune profile with a robust release of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors on the first month after CoronaVac vaccination followed by a gradual reduction over time and no increase after the booster dose. A stronger interaction between those mediators was noted over time. Prior exposure to the virus leaded to a more robust cellular immune response and a rise in antibody levels 60 days post CoronaVac than in individuals with no previous COVID-19. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated among individuals. Interpretation: Our data approach the effectiveness of CoronaVac association with BNT162b2 from the clinical and biological perspectives, aspects that have important implications for informing decisions about vaccine boosters. Funding: Fiocruz, Brazil.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Immunization, Secondary , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine/immunology , Brazil , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(12): e513-e516, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190914

ABSTRACT

Although post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 among adult survivors has gained significant attention, data in children hospitalized for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is limited. This study of commercially insured US children shows that those hospitalized with COVID-19 or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children have a substantial burden of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 sequelae and associated health care visits postdischarge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Adult , Humans , Aftercare , Follow-Up Studies , Patient Discharge , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Disease Progression , Delivery of Health Care
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25645, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190994

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Since December 2019, pneumonia caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), namely 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), has rapidly spread from Wuhan city to other cities across China. The present study was designed to describe the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of 74 hospitalized patients with COVID-19.Clinical data of 74 COVID-19 patients were collected to analyze the epidemiological, demographic, laboratory, radiological, and treatment data. Thirty-two patients were followed up and tested for the presence of the viral nucleic acid and by pulmonary computed tomography (CT) scan at 7 and 14 days after they were discharged.Among all COVID-19 patients, the median incubation period for patients and the median period from symptom onset to admission was all 6 days; the median length of hospitalization was 13 days. Fever symptoms were presented in 83.78% of the patients, and the second most common symptom was cough (74.32%), followed by fatigue and expectoration (27.03%). Inflammatory indicators, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) of the intensive care unit (ICU) patients were significantly higher than that of the non-ICU patients (P < .05). However, 50.00% of the ICU patients had their the ratio of T helper cells to cytotoxic T cells (CD4/CD8) ratio lower than 1.1, whose proportion is much higher than that in non-ICU patients (P < .01).Compared with patients in Wuhan, COVID-19 patients in Anhui Province seemed to have milder symptoms of infection, suggesting that there may be some regional differences in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between different cities.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibiotic Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cities/epidemiology , Cough/blood , Cough/therapy , Cough/virology , Female , Fever/blood , Fever/therapy , Fever/virology , Follow-Up Studies , Geography , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
5.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 92(4)2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2155498

ABSTRACT

Dear Editor, we read the original study by De Michele et al. titled "Post severe COVID-19 infection lung damages study. The experience of early three months multidisciplinary follow-up" with great interest...


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging
6.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 724, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139204

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic strained healthcare workers but the individual challenges varied in relation to actual work and changes in work. We investigated changes in healthcare workers' mental health under prolonging COVID-19 pandemic conditions, and heterogeneity in the mental-health trajectories. METHODS: A monthly survey over a full year was conducted for employees of the HUS Helsinki University Hospital (n = 4804) between 4th June 2020 to 28th May 2021. Pandemic-related potentially traumatic events (PTEs), work characteristics (e.g., contact to COVID-19 patients), local COVID-19 incidence, and demographic covariates were used to predict Mental Health Index-5 (MHI-5) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) in generalized multilevel and latent-class mixed model regressions. RESULTS: Local COVID-19 log-incidence (odds ratio, OR = 1.21, with 95% CI = 1.10-1.60), directly caring for COVID-19 patients (OR = 1.33, CI = 1.10-1.60) and PTEs (OR = 4.57, CI = 3.85-5.43) were all independently associated with psychological distress, when (additionally) adjusting for age, sex, profession, and calendar time. Effects of COVID-19 incidence on mental health were dissociable from calendar time (i.e., evolved in time) whereas those on sleep were not. Latent mental-health trajectories were characterized by a large class of "stable mental health" (62% of employees) and minority classes for "early shock, improving" (14%) and "early resilience, deteriorating" mental health (24%). The minority classes, especially "early shock, improving", were more likely to live alone and be exposed to PTEs than the others. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers faced changing and heterogeneous mental-health challenges as the COVID-19 pandemic prolonged. Adversity and mental ill-being may have accumulated in some employees, and factors like living arrangements may have played a role. Knowledge on employees' demographic and socioeconomic background, as well as further research on the factors affecting employees' resilience, may help in maintaining healthy and efficient workforce in the face of a prolonging pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Follow-Up Studies , Finland/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology
7.
Eur Respir J ; 60(5)2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) social distancing measures led to a dramatic decline in non-COVID-19 respiratory virus infections, providing a unique opportunity to study their impact on annual forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) decline, episodes of temporary drop in lung function (TDLF) suggestive of infection and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) in lung transplant recipients (LTRs). METHODS: All FEV1 values of LTRs transplanted between 2009 and April 2020 at the University Medical Center Groningen (Groningen, The Netherlands) were included. Annual FEV1 change was estimated with separate estimates for pre-social distancing (2009-2020) and the year with social distancing measures (2020-2021). Patients were grouped by individual TDLF frequency (frequent/infrequent). Respiratory virus circulation was derived from weekly hospital-wide respiratory virus infection rates. Effect modification by TDLF frequency and respiratory virus circulation was assessed. CLAD and TDLF rates were analysed over time. RESULTS: 479 LTRs (12 775 FEV1 values) were included. Pre-social distancing annual change in FEV1 was -114 (95% CI -133- -94) mL, while during social distancing FEV1 did not decline: 5 (95% CI -38-48) mL (difference pre-social distancing versus during social distancing: p<0.001). The frequent TDLF subgroup showed faster annual FEV1 decline compared with the infrequent TDLF subgroup (-150 (95% CI -181- -120) versus -90 (95% CI -115- -65) mL; p=0.003). During social distancing, we found significantly lower odds for any TDLF (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.33-0.85; p=0.008) and severe TDLF (OR 0.34, 0.16-0.71; p=0.005) as well as lower CLAD incidence (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.27-1.02; p=0.060). Effect modification by respiratory virus circulation indicated a significant association between TDLF/CLAD and respiratory viruses. CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19 social distancing the strong reduction in respiratory virus circulation coincided with markedly less FEV1 decline, fewer episodes of TDLF and possibly less CLAD. Effect modification by respiratory virus circulation suggests an important role for respiratory viruses in lung function decline in LTRs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Transplantation , Viruses , Humans , Transplant Recipients , Physical Distancing , Follow-Up Studies , Lung
8.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(3): e0103221, 2022 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137451

ABSTRACT

This study includes 259 consecutive nasopharyngeal swabs which tested positive for a molecular SARS-CoV-2 test and 77 subjects who were followed longitudinally, with nasopharyngeal swabs performed weekly until clinical recovery and a negative result for the molecular test were reached. All swabs were also tested with a Lumipulse SARS-CoV-2 chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) antigen assay. The antigen test was positive in 169 (65.3%) out of the 259 subjects, while no antigen was detected in 90 subjects (34.7%). In the antigen-positive subjects, clinical status moved slightly toward a more frequent presence of symptoms. Longitudinal follow-up shows how the time of negativization has a faster kinetic in the antigenic test than in the molecular test. Antigenic test result values, considered as a time-dependent covariate and log-transformed, were highly associated with the time to negative swab, with good prediction ability. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed a very good discrimination ability of antigenic tests in classifying negative swabs. The optimal cutoff which jointly maximized sensitivity and specificity was 1.55, resulting in an overall accuracy of 0.75, a sensitivity of 0.73, and a specificity of 0.83. After dichotomizing the antigenic test according to the previously determined cutoff value of 1.55, the time-dependent covariate Cox model again suggests a highly significant association of antigenic test values with the time to negative swab molecular: a subject with an antigenic test value lower than 1.55 had almost a 13-fold higher probability to also result negative in the molecular test compared to a subject with an antigenic test value higher than 1.55. IMPORTANCE Our work explores the possibility of using a sensible and reliable antigenic test in a wider range of SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic and clinical applications. Furthermore, this tool seems particularly promising in follow-up with infected subjects, because while the molecular test frequently yields the persistence of low positivities, raising yet unanswered questions, this antigenic test shows more uniform and faster negativization during the evolution of the infection, somehow paralleling the dynamics of infectivity. Although more data will be required to definitely prove it, we believe these findings might be of great interest.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunoenzyme Techniques , Luminescence , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
9.
S Afr Med J ; 112(11): 850-854, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Available clinical data have revealed that COVID-19 is associated with a risk of pulmonary microthrombosis and small airway disease, especially in patients with severe disease. These patients present with persistent pulmonary symptoms after recovery, with ventilation and perfusion abnormalities present on several imaging modalities. Few data are available on the occurrence of this complication in patients who earlier presented with a milder form of COVID-19, and their long-term follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of persistent lung perfusion abnormalities as a result of suspected air trapping or microthrombosis in non-hospitalised patients diagnosed with COVID-19. The long-term follow-up of these patients will also be investigated. METHODS: This was a retrospective study conducted at the nuclear medicine department of Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein. We reviewed the studies of 78 non-hospitalised patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection referred to our department from July 2020 to June 2021 for a perfusion-only single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) study or a ventilation perfusion (VQ) SPECT/CT study. All 78 patients were suspected of having pulmonary embolism, and had raised D-dimer levels, with persistent, worsening or new onset of cardiopulmonary symptoms after the diagnosis of COVID-19. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were studied. The median (interquartile range) age was 45 (41 - 58) years and the majority (88.5%) were females. Twenty-two (28.2%) of these patients had matching VQ defects with mosaic attenuation on CT. All 9 of the patients who had follow-up studies had abnormalities that persisted, even after 1 year. CONCLUSION: We confirm that persistent ventilation and perfusion abnormalities suspicious of small airway disease and pulmonary microthrombosis can occur in non-hospitalised patients diagnosed with a milder form of COVID-19. Our study also shows that these complications remain present even 1 year after the initial diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Incidence , Retrospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Perfusion
10.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(11): 1812-1815, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144248

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 vaccine acceptance is a psychological behavior influenced by many factors, including fear of an adverse effect on the reproductive system. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the COVID-19 vaccines effect on reproductive parameters among the male population of northern Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among 100 volunteers who received two doses of COVID-19 vaccines. A pre- and post-vaccination blood sample was collected and analyzed for testosterone, prolactin, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Semen samples were also collected and analyzed. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the values between pre- and post-vaccination. Results: Of the 100 samples analyzed, there was a significant increase in progressive sperm motility after the second dose of vaccination, but the increase was within the physiological limits (pre-55.03 [42.00-61.75] vs. post-57.50 [42.25-63.00], P = 0.008). Similarly, a significant increase in serum testosterone level after the second vaccination dose was observed (pre-380.65 [301.60-485.73] vs. post-410 [318.18-505.35], P = 0.016). Conclusion: These preliminary results show that the COVID-19 vaccines do not have any adverse effect on the reproductive parameters of men. A prospective long-term follow-up study will be necessary on all WHO -approved COVID vaccines to determine their long-term effect on men's reproductive health. The future follow-up study could strengthen our findings and encourage the men who have vaccine hesitancy to take due to fear of its effect on reproductive parameters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Semen Analysis , Prospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Saudi Arabia , Sperm Motility , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Testosterone
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1002927, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119878

ABSTRACT

Background: Research is lacking on the long-term influence of workplace factors on the mental health of health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We distributed two online surveys to health care workers between May and October 2020 (T1) and between February and April 2021 (T2). Perceived stress, coronavirus-related risks, and workplace factors were measured via self-report questionnaires at both time points. We conducted hierarchical linear regression to investigate the predictive factors for high stress. Results: A total of 2,110 participants from seven countries and 4,240 participants from nine countries were enrolled at T1 and T2, respectively. Among them, 612 participated in both surveys. We called this cohort T1 + T2. High stress was reported in 53.8 and 61.6% of participants at T1 and T2, respectively. In cohort T1 + T2, compared with the baseline, the level of stress rose significantly (6.0 ± 2.9 vs. 6.4 ± 3.1), as did health/safety in the workplace (3.9 ± 0.8 vs. 4.2 ± 0.7). Unfortunately, we did not detect any significant difference concerning support in the workplace. Among all factors at baseline, being older than 35 [ß (95% CI) = -0.92 (-1.45, -0.40)], support [-0.80 (-1.29, -0.32)], and health/safety in the workplace [-0.33 (-0.65, -0.01)] were independent protective factors, while a positive history of mental disorders [0.81 (0.26, 1.37)] and rejection in private life [0.86 (0.48, 1.25)] were risk factors for high stress at T2. Conclusion: To relieve the high stress of health care workers, organizational-level approaches should be implemented, especially measures designed to enhance support, health/safety in the workplace, and to reduce the rejection of the public.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Humans , Follow-Up Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel
13.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 408, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dyspnea is common after COVID-19 pneumonia and can be characterized by a defective CO2 diffusion (DLCO) despite normal pulmonary function tests (PFT). Nevertheless, DLCO impairment tends to normalize at 1 year, with no dyspnea regression. The altered regional distribution of ventilation and a dysfunction of the peripheral lung may characterize dyspnea at 1 year after COVID-19 pneumonia. We aimed at assessing the pattern of airway resistance and inflammation and the regional ventilation inhomogeneity in COVID-19 pneumonia survivors at 12-months after hospital discharge. METHODS: We followed up at 1-year patients previously admitted to the respiratory units (intensive care or sub-intensive care unit) for COVID-19 acute respiratory failure at 1-year after hospital discharge. PFT (spirometry, DLCO), impulse oscillometry (IOS), measurements of the exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) and Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) were used to evaluate lung volumes, CO2 diffusion capacity, peripheral lung inflammation/resistances and the regional inhomogeneity of ventilation distribution. A full medical examination was conducted, and symptoms of new onset (not present before COVID-19) were recorded. Patients were therefore divided into two groups based on the presence/absence of dyspnea (defined as mMRC ≥1) compared to evaluate differences in the respiratory function derived parameters. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients were admitted between October and December 2020. Of them, 42/67 (63%) patients were discharged alive and 33 were evaluated during the follow up. Their mean age was 64 ± 11 years and 24/33 (73%) were males. Their maximum respiratory support was in 7/33 (21%) oxygen, in 4/33 (12%) HFNC, in 14/33 (42%) NIV/CPAP and in 8/33 (24%) invasive mechanical ventilation. During the clinical examination, 15/33 (45%) reported dyspnea. When comparing the two groups, no significant differences were found in PFT, in the peripheral airway inflammation (FENO) or mechanical properties (IOS). However, EIT showed a significantly higher regional inhomogeneity in patients with dyspnea both during resting breathing (0.98[0.96-1] vs 1.1[1-1.1], p = 0.012) and during forced expiration (0.96[0.94-1] vs 1 [0.98-1.1], p = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: New onset dyspnea characterizes 45% of patients 1 year after COVID-19 pneumonia. In these patients, despite pulmonary function test may be normal, EIT shows a higher regional inhomogeneity both during quiet and forced breathing which may contribute to dyspnea. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT04343053, registration date 13/04/2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Female , COVID-19/complications , Follow-Up Studies , Carbon Dioxide , Lung , Dyspnea/etiology , Survivors , Inflammation
15.
Neurol India ; 70(5): 2003-2008, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117325

ABSTRACT

Background: Telemedicine (TM) consultations have shown to be feasible for the management of neurological conditions including movement disorders. In contrast, satisfaction with such consultations have been less studied. Objective: To assess the satisfaction of persons with a movement disorder with a TM consultation in comparison to previous experiences in face-to-face visits. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional multicenter study was carried out. Persons with a diagnosis of a movement disorder underwent a TM consultation. After the consultation concluded, a satisfaction survey was sent for the subject to fill out anonymously. The survey included ease of use-related items, setup-related items, and quality-of-service-related items. Results: A total of 175 survey responses were received (response rate of 71.4%), all of which were included for analysis. A total of 102 subjects considered that the TM consultation involved much less time in comparison to their previous experience with face-to-face visits. Overall, 96% reported to be satisfied with the consultation. In addition, 92% were satisfied or very satisfied with the neurologist ability to communicate recommendations. Furthermore, 93.7% indicated that the consultation was valuable, and 90.9% considered that they would recommend teleconsultation to another patient. Conclusion: Patients with a diagnosis of a movement disorder consider TM as a convenient and potential tool for health services with a high level of satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Essential Tremor , Parkinsonian Disorders , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Cross-Sectional Studies , Essential Tremor/diagnosis , Essential Tremor/therapy , Follow-Up Studies , Patient Satisfaction , Parkinsonian Disorders/diagnosis , Parkinsonian Disorders/therapy
16.
Viruses ; 14(11)2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116086

ABSTRACT

Background: The transmissible capacity and toxicity of SARS-CoV-2 variants are continually changing. We report here the follow-up study of hospitalized COVID-19 patients from 2020 to 2022. It is known that the PCR diagnosis for hospitalized patients sometimes causes confusion because of the incompatibility between their diagnosis and symptoms. We applied our sugar chain-immobilized gold-nanoparticles for the extraction and partial purification of RNA from specimens for quantitative RT-PCR assay and evaluated whether the results correlate with patients' symptoms. Methods and Results: Saliva specimens were taken from hospitalized patients with mild or moderate symptoms every early morning. At the time of RT-PCR diagnosis, two methods for the extraction and partial purification of RNA from the specimen were performed: a commonly used Boom (Qiagen) method and our original sugar chain-immobilized gold nanoparticle (SGNP) method. For symptoms, body temperature and oxygen saturation (SpO2) of patients were monitored every 4 h. Conclusions: It was clear that patients infected with the Delta variant needed more time to recover than those with the Omicron variant, and that the SGNP method showed more realistic correlation with the symptoms of patients compared with the common Qiagen method.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metal Nanoparticles , Humans , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Gold , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sugars , Follow-Up Studies , COVID-19/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/analysis , Sensitivity and Specificity , Carbohydrates
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Uncertainties remain regarding the nature and durability of the humoral immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). AIM: This study investigated immunoglobulin G response and neutralizing activity to evaluate the mean antibody concentrations and response duration induced by each vaccination regimen in a French adult population. METHODS: A study including blood sampling and questionnaires was carried out from November 2020 to July 2021 with three separate follow-up phases. Spike proteins and neutralizing antibodies were quantified using ELISA and a virus-neutralization test. RESULTS: Overall, 295 participants were included. Seroprevalences were 11.5% (n = 34), 10.5% (n = 31), and 68.1% (n = 201) in phases 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Importantly, 5.8% (n = 17) of participants lost their natural antibodies. Antibody response of participants with only a prior infection was 88.2 BAU/mL, significantly lower than those vaccinated, which was 1909.3 BAU/mL (p = 0.04). Moreover, the antibody response of vaccinated participants with a prior infection was higher (3593.8 BAU/mL) than those vaccinated without prior infection (3402.9 BAU/mL) (p = 0.78). Vaccinated participants with or without prior infection had a higher seroneutralization rate (91.0%) than those unvaccinated with prior infection (65.0%). CONCLUSION: These results demonstrated that single infection does not confer effective protection against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Adult , Humans , Follow-Up Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Antibodies, Viral
18.
Klin Lab Diagn ; 67(10): 561-569, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111722

ABSTRACT

The study of the characteristics and dynamics of laboratory biomarkers in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) with type 2 diabetes mellitus who underwent COVID-19-associated pneumonia is of great clinical importance for preventing the risk of adverse events. IN the study we used data from 65 patients in the present work. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 included patients with CVD: arterial hypertension (AH) in combination with coronary artery disease (CAD) without DM2 (n=45), group 2 included patients with CVD and DM2 (n=20). Patients were examined at baseline in the infectious disease hospital and 3 months after discharge. During laboratory examination of blood biosamples we evaluated parameters of general blood test; biochemical and immunologicai parameters; elastic properties of the vascular wall. The analyzed leukocyte parameters and their index coefficients - increase in NLR ratio (neutrophils/lymphocytes) and decrease in LYM/CRP ratio (lymphocytes/CRP) were more significantly changed in DM2 group. Patients in both groups had a significant excess of baseline max CRP concentrations with decrease in parameters after 3 months, but with persistent excess values in group 2. Three months after discharge patients with DM2 had levels of hs-CRP, IL-1ß and TNFa and NT-proBNP, that exceeded both the reference values and those in group 1, which reflected the presence of more pronounced vascular inflammatory potential for possible adverse events in this group of patients in post-COVID period. The method of multiple regression showed that DM2 is an independent risk factor for increased stiffness of the vascular wall. Thus, dynamic control of laboratory parameters has prognostic value in assessing the nature of the course of COVID-19 associated pneumonia in patients with CVD and DM2 developing an algorithm for personalized monitoring of patients in the post-COVID period with the aim of timely prevention of unwanted vascular complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/complications , Follow-Up Studies , Biomarkers
19.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275381, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: One of the stages of reproduction of SARS-CoV-2 is the S-protein glycosylation to facilitate penetration into target cells. It has been suggested that SARS-CoV-2 is able to enter erythrocytes, interact with heme and porphyrin, which could influence HbA1c levels. Assessment of HbA1c levels in individuals with acute COVID-19 and after recovery may show clinical relevance of this hypothesis. AIM: To assess HbA1c levels in patients with COVID-19 in the acute phase and in early (6-8 weeks) and late (52±2 weeks) periods after recovery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter prospective study, which included patients hospitalized in Endocrinology Research Centre and the City Clinical Hospital № 52" diagnosed with COVID-19, virus identified/ not identified. Patients were divided into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level and the presence or absence of previous history of diabetes previous history of diabetes mellitus (DM): HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, HbA1c > 6.0% and patients with DM. Patients were examined during the acute COVID-19 phase and in early (6-8 weeks) and late (52±2 weeks) periods after recovery. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed in the group with initial HbA1c > 6.0% to clarify the diagnosis. RESULTS: We included 194 patients in the study. During the follow-up, 52 patients were examined in 6-8 week period: 7 with HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, 34 with HbA1c > 6.0%, 11-with previously diagnosed DM. Carbohydrate metabolism assessment in the later stages (52±2 weeks) after recovery was performed in 78 patients: 33 patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, 36 patients with HbA1c > 6.0% and 9 patients with previously established diabetes. HbA1c median in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0% was 5.7% [5.3;5.8], with HbA1c>6.0% -6.4% [6.2; 6.6], with previously diagnosed DM-7.7% [7.2; 8.9]. Statistically significant decrease in HbA1c over time 6-8 weeks after extracts were obtained in both groups of individuals without a history of DM (Wilcoxon test, p<0.05). After 52±2 weeks we observed HbA1c decrease in all three groups (Fridman test, p<0.05): in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0% median HbA1c was 5.5[5.3;5.7], with HbA1c>6.0% - 6.1[6.15;6.54], with previously diagnosed DM-7.8 [5.83; 8.08]. Development of DM after 52±2 weeks was recorded in 7.24% of all examined patients without a history of DM, which is 16.6% of the total number of patients examined in dynamics with HbA1c > 6.0%. CONCLUSION: HbA1c elevation during the acute phase of COVID-19 may be false due to the effect of SARS-CoV-2 on hemoglobin kinetics and/or detection on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 virion highly glycosylated S-proteins by high performance liquid chromatography determinations. Upon detection HbA1c > 6.0% in patients with COVID-19 in the active phase of the disease without concomitant hyperglycemia re-determine the level of HbA1c after recovery is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Follow-Up Studies , Prospective Studies , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals , Survivors
20.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 178, 2022 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813341

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although social isolation has been associated with a higher mortality risk, little is known about the potential different impacts of face-to-face and non-face-to-face isolation on mortality. We examined the prospective associations of four types of social isolation, including face-to-face isolation with co-inhabitants and non-co-inhabitants, non-face-to-face isolation, and club/organization isolation, with all-cause and cause-specific mortality separately. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 30,430 adults in Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS), who were recruited during 2003-2008 and followed up till Dec 2019. RESULTS: During an average of 13.2 years of follow-up, 4933 deaths occurred during 396,466 person-years. Participants who lived alone had higher risks of all-cause (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.49) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) (1.61; 1.20-2.03) mortality than those who had ≥ 3 co-habitant contact after adjustment for thirteen potential confounders. Compared with those who had ≥ 1 time/month non-co-inhabitant contact, those without such contact had higher risks of all-cause (1.60; 1.20-2.00) and CVD (1.91; 1.20-2.62) mortality. The corresponding AHR (95% CI) in participants without telephone/mail contact were 1.27 (1.14-1.42) for all-cause, 1.30 (1.08-1.56) for CVD, and 1.37 (1.12-1.67) for other-cause mortality. However, no association of club/organization contact with the above mortality and no association of all four types of isolation with cancer mortality were found. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, face-to-face and non-face-to-face isolation were both positively associated with all-cause, CVD-, and other-cause (but not cancer) mortality. Our finding suggests a need to promote non-face-to-face contact among middle-aged and older adults.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks , Cardiovascular Diseases , Aged , Cause of Death , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Social Isolation
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL