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1.
Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed ; 107(3): 207-211, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861592

ABSTRACT

Food allergy is common, it can lead to significant morbidity andnegatively impacts on quality of life; therefore, it is vitally important we get the diagnosis right. However, making the diagnosis can be complex. Clinical history is the most important diagnostic tool and subsequent investigation may help confirm the diagnosis. The investigations available to most paediatric departments are skin prick testing and specific IgE so we will focus on these. Within this article we explore the evidence related to targeted testing and how to interpret these within the clinical context.


Subject(s)
Food Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Adolescent , Child , Food Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Quality of Life , Skin Tests
2.
Allergy ; 77(7): 2038-2052, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662232

ABSTRACT

Cannabis is the most widely used recreational drug in the world. Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica have been selectively bred to develop their psychoactive properties. The increasing use in many countries has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Cannabis can provoke both type 1 and type 4 allergic reactions. Officially recognized allergens include a pathogenesis-related class 10 allergen, profilin, and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein. Other allergens may also be relevant, and recognition of allergens may vary between countries and continents. Cannabis also has the potential to provoke allergic cross-reactions to plant foods. Since cannabis is an illegal substance in many countries, research has been hampered, leading to challenges in diagnosis since no commercial extracts are available for testing. Even in countries such as Canada, where cannabis is legalized, diagnosis may rely solely on the purchase of cannabis for prick-to-prick skin tests. Management consists of avoidance, with legal issues hindering the development of other treatments such as immunotherapy. Education of healthcare professionals is similarly lacking. This review aimed to summarize the current status of cannabis allergy and proposes recommendations for the future management of this global issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cannabis , Food Hypersensitivity , Hypersensitivity , Allergens , Antigens, Plant , Cannabis/adverse effects , Consensus , Food Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Food Hypersensitivity/epidemiology , Food Hypersensitivity/etiology , Humans , Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Immunoglobulin E , Pandemics , Skin Tests
3.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526471

ABSTRACT

Alpha-gal syndrome (AGS) is a hypersensitivity reaction to mammalian meat that develops after tick bite exposure. AGS was first described in 2009 and testing for the allergy has become available in the last decade. We report the case of a 56-year-old farmer with a history of frequent lone star tick bites who presented with a 7-year history of diffuse urticaria occurring hours after eating red meat. AGS is likely underdiagnosed because of the unusual presentation of the allergy, historic lack of available testing, and deficiency of physician knowledge about the condition. Recognition of AGS is important both to help alleviate symptom burden and to avoid iatrogenesis. Patients with AGS should not receive products containing mammalian products, such as cat-gut suture, porcine-derived heart valves, and bovine-derived vaccines. Patients with AGS may present in a variety of clinical environments and physicians of all kinds should be able to recognise the symptoms.


Subject(s)
Food Hypersensitivity , Red Meat , Tick Bites , Urticaria , Animals , Cattle , Food Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Food Hypersensitivity/etiology , Humans , Meat
6.
Pediatr Ann ; 50(5): e190, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278551
10.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 126(1): 83-88.e1, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Food allergy has a known effect on quality of life (QoL), but this has not been extensively studied during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the levels of anxiety of mothers of children aged 0 to 8 years with food allergy compared with families of children without a food allergy and the health-related QoL among children with food allergy during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: In a mixed-methods study, Canadian mothers of children aged 0 to 8 years with (cases) and without (controls) food allergy provided demographic data and completed age-appropriate anxiety questionnaires between April 14, 2020, and April 28, 2020. The cases also provided food allergy-related data and completed the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire. In-depth interviews were subsequently conducted with purposefully selected cases. RESULTS: In a total of 580 participants, 5.5% were cases and 94.5% were controls. For mothers of children aged 0 to 1.5 years, anxiety levels did not differ between cases and controls. For mothers of children aged 1.5 to 8 years, anxiety levels were higher in cases vs controls (P < .05). Among the cases, neither overall nor domain-specific Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire scores differed between age groups (0-3 vs 4-7 years), even after adjustment for confounding variables, including childcare during the pandemic. Qualitatively, the following 3 themes were identified: unexpected challenges of food shopping; less food-related food anxiety during the pandemic; and differences and delays in food allergy testing and therapy. CONCLUSION: Mothers of children with food allergy reported high anxiety and poor health-related QoL. Yet, qualitatively, day-to-day food allergy management was better during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Hypersensitivity/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Canada/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Food Hypersensitivity/complications , Food Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mothers/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 8(9): 2851-2857, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670976

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV2 pandemic has prompted a re-evaluation of our current practice of medicine. The seemingly abrupt worldwide spread of this disease resulted in immediate changes and a reduction in many allergy-focussed services and procedures. The reality of the long-term circulation of this virus in our communities requires us to evolve as a specialty. In this article, we outline current and future challenges in the management of food allergy in light of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We focus on infant food allergy prevention, management of anaphylaxis, accurate diagnosis with oral food challenges, and active management of food allergy with oral immunotherapy. This article identifies the challenges of conflicting guidelines, shortcomings of acute management approaches, and inherent system deficiencies. We offer perspectives and strategies that can be implemented now, including an evaluation of virtual care and telemedicine for the management of food allergy. The use of a shared decision-making model results in novel approaches that can benefit our patients and our specialty for years to come. COVID-19 has forced us to re-evaluate our current way of thinking about food allergy management to better treat our patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Food Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Food Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Immunotherapy/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Anaphylaxis/complications , Anaphylaxis/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Food Hypersensitivity/complications , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 125(4): 481-483, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716534
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