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1.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol ; 33(2): e13731, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700683

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Parents of children with food allergies (CwFA) experience reduced quality of life (QoL) and may have reduced access to in-person interventions in the COVID-19 pandemic. This trial developed and evaluated an online, self-help, information provision website, aimed at improving QoL in parents of CwFA. METHODS: In a single-blinded, randomised controlled trial (RCT), participants were randomised to either receive access to the website or a waiting-list control. At baseline, post-intervention (week 4) and follow-up (week 8), measures of parental food allergy-related QoL, depression, anxiety, stress, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and self-efficacy were obtained. RESULTS: A total of 205 participants were randomised; 97% were females, 91% white and 78% educated ≥ degree level, with a mean age of 38.95 years (SD = 6.89). 44.9% (n = 92) were retained at follow-up. The arms did not significantly differ on any outcome at any time point. For a sub-group of participants above the clinical cut-off for depression at baseline, the intervention may have improved QoL. Participants reported the website content as useful and accessible, but accessed it infrequently. In baseline data, IU and self-efficacy were significantly associated with QoL. CONCLUSION: While the COVID-19 pandemic has encouraged greater provision of online interventions, our RCT suggests this particular website is not suitable for this population in general, although future research could examine its efficacy for depressed parents of CwFA, to increase confidence that the sub-group finding was not a Type 1 error. The baseline data suggest IU and self-efficacy remain potential proximal targets for intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Hypersensitivity , Internet-Based Intervention , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Humans , Parents , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep ; 21(2): 8, 2021 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070935

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has challenged healthcare system capacities and safety for health care workers, reshaping doctor-patient interaction favoring e-Health or telemedicine. The pandemic situation may make difficult to prioritize patients with allergies diseases (AD), face-to-face evaluation, and moreover concern about the possible COVID-19 diagnosis, since COVID-19 shared many symptoms in common with AD. Being COVID-19 a novel disease, everyone is susceptible; there are some advances on vaccine and specific treatment. We evaluate existing literature on allergic diseases (AD): allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, drug allergy, and skin allergy, and potential underlying mechanisms for any interrelationship between AD and COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: There is inconclusive and controversial evidence of the association between AD and the risk of adverse clinical outcomes of COVID-19. AD patients should minimize hospital and face-to-face visits, and those who have used biologics and allergen immunotherapy should continue the treatment. It is essential to wear personal protective equipment for the protection of health care workers. Social distancing, rational use of facemasks, eye protection, and hand disinfection for health care workers and patients deserve further attention and promotion. Teleconsultation during COVID-19 times for AD patients is very encouraging and telemedicine platform can provide a reliable service in patient care.


Subject(s)
Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Rhinitis, Allergic/therapy , Telemedicine , Asthma/immunology , Biological Products , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/immunology , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/therapy , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Desensitization, Immunologic , Disease Management , Disease Outbreaks , Drug Hypersensitivity/immunology , Drug Hypersensitivity/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Physical Distancing , Rhinitis, Allergic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol ; 21(2): 159-165, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061092

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the practice of paediatric allergy. RECENT FINDINGS: Given significant overlap in symptoms, care must be taken to differentiate routine allergic conditions from COVID-19 infection but it appears that most allergic diseases are not risk factors for a severe COVID-19 course. The full impact of restricted allergy/immunology ambulatory services will take months to years to fully understand. One benefit of having to adapt practice style is greater awareness and acceptance of shared decision-making and recognition of preference-sensitive care options in food allergy, in particular for approaches towards allergy prevention, treatment, and anaphylaxis care. Social distancing and masks have helped reduce spread of common respiratory viruses, which may be helping to lower the incidence of viral-associated wheezing episodes, enhancing evidence of the effects of preventing exposure of young children to respiratory viruses on asthma pathogenesis, as well as on allergic rhinitis. There has been a revolution in the rise of telemedicine to increase access to high-quality allergy/immunology specialty care. SUMMARY: Although the field has adapted to remain operational in the face of a significant challenge, it is important to apply lessons learned to evolve patient care and optimize treatment in the aftermath of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology , Eczema/epidemiology , Food Hypersensitivity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Rhinitis, Allergic/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Disease Management , Eczema/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Humans , Rhinitis, Allergic/therapy , Telemedicine
9.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) ; 49(1): 150-152, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059887

ABSTRACT

Food allergy immunotherapy is a promising allergen-specific approach to manage food allergy in children, although it is not exempt from adverse events, even severe. The adverse events are not predictable and furthermore cofactors can play a role in triggering them. During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients on food allergy immunotherapy should be provided with suggestions on how to proceed in the event of COVID-19 infection occurring or is suspected. These recommendations would be of support to clinical practitioners dealing with patients on food allergy immunotherapy since there is little data in the literature on the topic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Hypersensitivity/complications , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Child , Clinical Protocols , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Humans , Medical Staff/education
10.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 56(9)2020 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738923

ABSTRACT

The positive impact of probiotic strains on human health has become more evident than ever before. Often delivered through food, dietary products, supplements, and drugs, different legislations for safety and efficacy issues have been prepared. Furthermore, regulatory agencies have addressed various approaches toward these products, whether they authorize claims mentioning a disease's diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. Due to the diversity of bacteria and yeast strains, strict approaches have been designed to assess for side effects and post-market surveillance. One of the most essential delivery systems of probiotics is within food, due to the great beneficial health effects of this system compared to pharmaceutical products and also due to the increasing importance of food and nutrition. Modern lifestyle or various diseases lead to an imbalance of the intestinal flora. Nonetheless, as the amount of probiotic use needs accurate calculations, different factors should also be taken into consideration. One of the novelties of this review is the presentation of the beneficial effects of the administration of probiotics as a potential adjuvant therapy in COVID-19. Thus, this paper provides an integrative overview of different aspects of probiotics, from human health care applications to safety, quality, and control.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements/standards , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Liver Diseases/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Probiotics/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Celiac Disease/therapy , Clostridium Infections/therapy , Constipation/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Depressive Disorder/therapy , Diverticular Diseases/therapy , Dysentery/therapy , Enterocolitis, Necrotizing/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Helicobacter Infections/therapy , Hepatic Encephalopathy/therapy , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Probiotics/adverse effects , Probiotics/standards , Quality Control , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Acta Biomed ; 91(2): 204-206, 2020 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-295264

ABSTRACT

In children with food allergy the visits should be limited to those that are unequivocally needed on clinical basis. Food challenge can be performed in selected situations, taking a more detailed history to make sure that patients provide whatever information we need. The maintenance of a safe diet can be hampered by several factors. Nutritional supplementation may be necessary.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Food Hypersensitivity , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Administration, Oral , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Food Hypersensitivity/complications , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
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