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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 875030, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865470

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought about a significant and far-reaching impact on the world's business environment, corporations, and individuals. In the face of the general shortage of funds caused by the pandemic, assuming corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a problem for every enterprise manager. In the recent years, as corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a hot topic globally, many enterprises have chosen to incorporate social responsibility into their development strategies. The food industry is a basic industry related to people's livelihood, especially in the pandemic. Its social responsibility efficiency deserves our attention. This article takes 17 sample enterprises whose CSR performance between 2012 and 2020 in China and reports are above the industry level as examples. Constructing the super-efficiency data envelopment analysis (DEA)-Malmquist-Tobit model explores the social responsibility efficiency of these enterprises. It analyzes the pandemic's impact on CSR efficiency. The results show that COVID-19 has promoted the social responsibility efficiency of the sample enterprises in the food industry. Besides, the level of technical efficiency and technological progress in the food industry is relatively high. Still, most enterprises are below the industry's average level. Before the outbreak of the pandemic, the size of enterprises is the key factor affecting the efficiency of CSR. After then, the listing years of enterprises then become the key factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Industry , Humans , Industry , Pandemics , Social Responsibility
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 752112, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775941

ABSTRACT

Food fraud not only exacerbates human public health risks but also threatens the business development of food and related industries. Therefore, how to curb food fraud effectively becomes a crucial issue for governments, industries, and consumers. Previous studies have demonstrated that enterprise food fraud is subject to joint influences of factor at various hierarchical levels within a complex system of stakeholders. To address enterprise food fraud, it is necessary to identify the key such factors and elucidate the functional mechanisms, as well as systematic analysis of the interrelationships among clusters and factors. Hence, we grounded on a social co-governance perspective and investigated the food fraud key influencing factors and their interrelationships in an emerging food market - China, by using the DEMATEL-based analytic network process (DANP). Results showed that the identified key cluster was government regulation, social governance, and detection techniques. Four other key factors were also identified, including government regulatory capability and penalty intensity, expected economic benefits, maturity of market reputation mechanism, and transparency of supply chain. Policy implications from the social co-governance perspective for China and similar economies are discussed finally.


Subject(s)
Food Industry , Fraud , China , Commerce , Government , Humans
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 705225, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775819

ABSTRACT

Coffee production is a global industry with roasteries throughout the world. Workers in this industry are exposed to complex mixtures of gases, dusts, and vapors including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, coffee dust, allergens, alpha-diketones, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Adverse respiratory health outcomes such as respiratory symptoms, reduced pulmonary function, asthma, and obliterative bronchiolitis can occur among exposed workers. In response to health hazard evaluations requests received from 17 small- to medium-sized coffee facilities across the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conducted investigations during 2016-2017 to understand the burden of respiratory abnormalities, exposure characteristics, relationships between exposures and respiratory effects, and opportunities for exposure mitigation. Full-shift, task-based, and instantaneous personal and area air samples for diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione and other VOCs were collected, and engineering controls were evaluated. Medical evaluations included questionnaire, spirometry, impulse oscillometry, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide. Exposure and health assessments were conducted using standardized tools and approaches, which enabled pooling data for aggregate analysis. The pooled data provided a larger population to better address the requestors' concern of the effect of exposure to alpha-diketones on the respiratory heath of coffee workers. This paper describes the rationale for the exposure and health assessment strategy, the approach used to achieve the study objectives, and its advantages and limitations.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis Obliterans , Occupational Exposure , Bronchiolitis Obliterans/etiology , Coffee/adverse effects , Diacetyl/adverse effects , Diacetyl/analysis , Food Industry , Humans , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/analysis , United States
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686812

ABSTRACT

Flavonols are a subclass of natural flavonoids characterized by a remarkable number of biotechnological applications and health-promoting properties. They attract researchers' attention due to many epidemiological studies supporting their usage. They are phytochemicals commonly present in our diet, being ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and, in particular, relatively very abundant in fruits and vegetables. All these aspects make flavonols candidates of choice for the valorization of products, based on the presence of a remarkable number of different chemical structures, each one characterized by specific chemical features capable of influencing biological targets inside the living organisms in very different manners. In this review, we analyzed the biochemical and physiological characteristics of flavonols focalizing our attention on the most promising compounds to shed some light on their increasing utilization in biotechnological applications in processing industries, as well as their suitable employment to improve the overall wellness of the humankind.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Flavonols/metabolism , Flavonols/pharmacology , Food Industry , Fruit/chemistry , Functional Food , Humans , Vegetables/chemistry
5.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263393, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674011

ABSTRACT

Since it is an important human need and many organizations are involved in the value chain, the agricultural food supply chain is exposed to various risks that arise naturally or through human actions. This study aims to develop the application of a quality function deployment approach to increase the resilience of the food supply chain by understanding customer needs and logistical risks in the food supply chain. In-depth studies with empirical analysis were conducted to determine the importance of customer needs, food supply chain risks, and actions to improve supply chain resilience of SMEs in the agri-food industry. The result shows that the top three customer needs are "attractive, bright color", "firm texture" and "fresh smell". The top three risks in the agri-food supply chain are "improper storage," "Harvest Failure" and "Human Resource Risks" and the top three resilience actions are "continuous training," "preventive maintenance," and "supply chain forecasting." The implications of this study are to propose an idea that broadens the perspective of supply chain resilience in the agri-food industry by incorporating the needs of customers in considering how to mitigate the existing risks to the satisfaction of customers, and it also highlights the relatively low skill and coordination of the workforce in agri-food supply chains.


Subject(s)
Agriculture/standards , Commerce/standards , Consumer Behavior , Food Industry/standards , Food Supply/standards , Total Quality Management/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
6.
Matern Child Nutr ; 18(2): e13301, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583474

ABSTRACT

Most babies in France are fed with infant formula and then commercial complementary foods, many of which are ultra-processed and harmful to health. Internationally, there is opposition by the baby food industry to the introduction of public health policies that would limit the marketing and consumption of such products. Our aim was to identify the key baby food industry actors, describe their history and corporate political activity (CPA) in France. We sourced publicly available information, which we triangulated with data from 10 semi-structured interviews. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken simultaneously to data collection, guided by an existing classification of the CPA of the food industry. The baby food industry in France has shaped the science on infant and young child nutrition and nurtured long-established relationships with health professionals. This corporate science and these relationships helped baby food companies to portray themselves as experts on child-related topics. The baby food industry has also engaged with a broad range of civil society organisations, particularly through the concept of the first 1000 days of life, and during the covid-19 pandemic. We found evidence, although limited, that the baby food industry directly lobbied the French government. Since its early development in France in the 19th century, the baby food industry used its CPA to promote its products and protect and sustain its market. Our findings can be used to recognise, anticipate and address the CPA of this industry, and to minimise any negative influence it may have on babies' and mother's health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Female , Food Industry , Health Occupations , Humans , Infant , Infant Formula , Pandemics
7.
Molecules ; 26(2)2021 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389465

ABSTRACT

The food sector includes several large industries such as canned food, pasta, flour, frozen products, and beverages. Those industries transform agricultural raw materials into added-value products. The fruit and vegetable industry is the largest and fastest-growing segment of the world agricultural production market, which commercialize various products such as juices, jams, and dehydrated products, followed by the cereal industry products such as chocolate, beer, and vegetable oils are produced. Similarly, the root and tuber industry produces flours and starches essential for the daily diet due to their high carbohydrate content. However, the processing of these foods generates a large amount of waste several times improperly disposed of in landfills. Due to the increase in the world's population, the indiscriminate use of natural resources generates waste and food supply limitations due to the scarcity of resources, increasing hunger worldwide. The circular economy offers various tools for raising awareness for the recovery of waste, one of the best alternatives to mitigate the excessive consumption of raw materials and reduce waste. The loss and waste of food as a raw material offers bioactive compounds, enzymes, and nutrients that add value to the food cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. This paper systematically reviewed literature with different food loss and waste by-products as animal feed, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products that strongly contribute to the paradigm shift to a circular economy. Additionally, this review compiles studies related to the integral recovery of by-products from the processing of fruits, vegetables, tubers, cereals, and legumes from the food industry, with the potential in SARS-CoV-2 disease and bacterial diseases treatment.


Subject(s)
Agriculture/methods , Drug Industry , Food Industry , Waste Products/economics , Agriculture/economics , Cosmetics/economics , Edible Grain , Food-Processing Industry/economics , Food-Processing Industry/methods , Fruit , Plant Roots , Plant Tubers , Vegetables
8.
Microb Biotechnol ; 13(6): 1689-1701, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343797

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is not only a challenge for public health and hospitals, but affects many aspects of our societies. This Lilliput minireview deals with problems that the pandemic causes for the food industry, addressing the presence and persistence of SARS-CoV-2 in the food environment, methods of virus inactivation and the protection of the food worker and the consumer. So far food has not been implicated in the transmission of the infection, but social disruptions caused by the pandemic could cause problems with food security.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Food Industry , Food Supply , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Feces/virology , Humans , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sewage/virology , Water Microbiology
9.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(7): 557-564, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286610

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Explore workplace control frequencies and factors associated with US food retail workers' safety perceptions during COVID-19. METHODS: An online, cross-sectional survey captured working conditions and safety perceptions among a large, national sample of US food retail workers from July to October 2020. RESULTS: Overall, 40.3% reported feeling "not so" or "not protected" by COVID-19 controls. Administrative controls were more commonly reported (56.8% reported ≥5 controls) than engineering (19.5% reported ≥3). Fomite-related controls were more common than those reducing interpersonal contact. After adjustment, organizational safety climate (prevalence ratio (PR): 1.53, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.89), and perceived strict prevention measure enforcement (PR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.78) were associated with safety perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: Many workers do not feel well-protected by COVID-19 controls. Safety climate and control enforcement are associated with workers' COVID-19 safety perceptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Occupational Stress , Pandemics , Safety , Workplace/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Food Industry , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
10.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0242456, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264207

ABSTRACT

Since May 2020, several COVID-19 outbreaks have occurred in the German meat industry despite various protective measures, and temperature and ventilation conditions were considered as possible high-risk factors. This cross-sectional study examined meat and poultry plants to assess possible risk factors. Companies completed a self-administered questionnaire on the work environment and protective measures taken to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for the possibility to distance at least 1.5 meters, break rules, and employment status was performed to identify risk factors associated with COVID-19 cases. Twenty-two meat and poultry plants with 19,072 employees participated. The prevalence of COVID-19 in the seven plants with more than 10 cases was 12.1% and was highest in the deboning and meat cutting area with 16.1%. A subsample analysis where information on maximal ventilation rate per employee was available revealed an association with the ventilation rate (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.996, 95% CI 0.993-0.999). When including temperature as an interaction term in the working area, the association with the ventilation rate did not change. When room temperatures increased, the chance of testing positive for COVID-19 (AOR 0.90 95% CI 0.82-0.99) decreased, and the chance for testing positive for COVID-19for the interaction term (AOR 1.001, 95% CI 1.000-1.003) increased. Employees who work where a minimum distance of less than 1.5 m between workers was the norm had a higher chance of testing positive (AOR 3.61; 95% CI 2.83-4.6). Our results further indicate that climate conditions and low outdoor air flow are factors that can promote the spread of SARS-CoV-2 aerosols. A possible requirement for pandemic mitigation strategies in industrial workplace settings is to increase the ventilation rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Food Industry , Workplace , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Employment , Food Industry/organization & administration , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Meat Products/supply & distribution , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Temperature , Ventilation , Workplace/organization & administration
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206355

ABSTRACT

The current SARS-COVID-19 crisis has demonstrated the dangers that airborne virus (AV) pandemics pose to the health of all workers (particularly in the meat processing industry), the economic health of the food industry, and food security. The impact that the current pandemic has had on the food industry points to the need for a proactive rather than reactive approach towards preventing future AV outbreaks. Such a proactive approach should be based on empirical assessments of current AV food safety practices and the development of more robust practices tailored to the culture and needs of the food industry. Moreover, a proactive approach is necessary in order to better prepare the food industry for future AV outbreaks, protect the health of workers, reduce disparities in AV occupational health risks, and enhance the safety of the food supply chain. The aim of this review is to make the case for a new food safety research paradigm that incorporates the intensive study of airborne viruses under conditions that simulate food industry work environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Industry , Food-Processing Industry , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249796, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183675

ABSTRACT

The Japanese Ministry of Health requires large-scale cooking facilities to use sodium hypochlorite aqueous solution (HYP) on food preparation tools, equipment, and facilities to prevent secondary contamination. This study aimed to compare the disinfecting effect of HYP and surfactant using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) swab testing on large-scale equipment and facilities that could not be disassembled and disinfected in hospital kitchen. From May 2018 to July 2018, ATP swab tests were performed on the following six locations in the Shizuoka Cancer Centre Dietary Department Kitchen: cooking counter, mobile cooking counter, refrigerator handle, conveyor belt, tap handle, and sink. Six relative light unit (RLU) measurements were taken from each location. The log10 values of the RLU measurements were evaluated by dividing the samples into two groups: the control group (surfactant followed by HYP swabbing) and the HYP group (HYP swabbing only). The results showed that the RLUs (log10 values) in both the groups improved after disinfection (p<0.05), except for the RLUs (log10 values) of the mobile cooking counter, tap handle, and sink in the control group after the HYP swab. The changes in the RLU (log10 value) did not differ between the two groups for all locations of the kitchen. Hence, HYP swabbing of large-scale equipment and facilities provides the same level of disinfection as surfactants and can be as beneficial.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/analysis , Disinfection/methods , Food Industry/standards , Luminescent Measurements/methods , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Surface-Active Agents/pharmacology , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Food Industry/methods , Hospitals , Humans
14.
Poult Sci ; 100(3): 100828, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139579

ABSTRACT

Originating in Wuhan city, Hubei province of China, and rapid spread to multiple countries, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has emerged as a novel public health emergence. During early February, spread of misinformation and rumors driven by the fear of linking chicken meat and eggs in the transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among human population is witnessed in India. This resulted drastic reduction in consumption of poultry products with subsequent fall in demand thereby prices. The COVID-19-driven lockdown during March in the country has further accentuated the crippling poultry industry following the arrest of feed and healthcare essentials and destruction of eggs, chicks, and birds. Here, we have analyzed the impact of COVID-19 on the poultry industry and showed the realistic flow of events that resulted in its economic fallout by disruption of poultry protein chain during pandemic crisis. The projected loss caused because of these events for the Indian poultry industry is around USD 3053 million. The economic impact is not uniform across the country owing to regional differences in consumption pattern and percent non-vegetarians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Food Industry/trends , Poultry , Animals , Chickens , Communicable Disease Control , Eggs , Food Industry/economics , Humans , India/epidemiology
15.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(3): e25202, 2021 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133824

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence demonstrates that obesity is associated with a higher risk of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. Excessive alcohol consumption and "comfort eating" as coping mechanisms during times of high stress have been shown to further exacerbate mental and physical ill-health. Global examples suggest that unhealthy food and alcohol brands and companies are using the COVID-19 pandemic to further market their products. However, there has been no systematic, in-depth analysis of how "Big Food" and "Big Alcohol" are capitalizing on the COVID-19 pandemic to market their products and brands. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to quantify the extent and nature of online marketing by alcohol and unhealthy food and beverage companies during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. METHODS: We conducted a content analysis of all COVID-19-related social media posts made by leading alcohol and unhealthy food and beverage brands (n=42) and their parent companies (n=12) over a 4-month period (February to May 2020) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. RESULTS: Nearly 80% of included brands and all parent companies posted content related to COVID-19 during the 4-month period. Quick service restaurants (QSRs), food and alcohol delivery companies, alcohol brands, and bottle shops were the most active in posting COVID-19-related content. The most common themes for COVID-19-related marketing were isolation activities and community support. Promotion of hygiene and home delivery was also common, particularly for QSRs and alcohol and food delivery companies. Parent companies were more likely to post about corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, such as donations of money and products, and to offer health advice. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show that Big Food and Big Alcohol are incessantly marketing their products and brands on social media platforms using themes related to COVID-19, such as isolation activities and community support. Parent companies are frequently posting about CSR initiatives, such as donations of money and products, thereby creating a fertile environment to loosen current regulation or resist further industry regulation. "COVID-washing" by large alcohol brands, food and beverage brands, and their parent companies is both common and concerning. The need for comprehensive regulations to restrict unhealthy food and alcohol marketing, as recommended by the World Health Organization, is particularly acute in the COVID-19 context and is urgently required to "build back better" in a post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Industry , Marketing/methods , Marketing/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Alcoholic Beverages/statistics & numerical data , Australia/epidemiology , Food/statistics & numerical data , Humans
16.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 45, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076140

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All countries are facing decisions about which population groups to prioritize for access to COVID-19 vaccination after the first vaccine products have been licensed, at which time supply shortages are inevitable. Our objective is to define the key target populations, their size, and priority for a COVID-19 vaccination program in the context of China. METHODS: On the basis of utilitarian and egalitarian principles, we define and estimate the size of tiered target population groups for a phased introduction of COVID-19 vaccination, considering evolving goals as vaccine supplies increase, detailed information on the risk of illness and transmission, and past experience with vaccination during the 2009 influenza pandemic. Using publicly available data, we estimated the size of target population groups, and the number of days needed to vaccinate 70% of the target population. Sensitivity analyses considered higher vaccine coverages and scaled up vaccine delivery relative to the 2009 pandemic. RESULTS: Essential workers, including staff in the healthcare, law enforcement, security, nursing homes, social welfare institutes, community services, energy, food and transportation sectors, and overseas workers/students (49.7 million) could be prioritized for vaccination to maintain essential services in the early phase of a vaccination program. Subsequently, older adults, individuals with underlying health conditions and pregnant women (563.6 million) could be targeted for vaccination to reduce the number of individuals with severe COVID-19 outcomes, including hospitalizations, critical care admissions, and deaths. In later stages, the vaccination program could be further extended to target adults without underlying health conditions and children (784.8 million), in order to reduce symptomatic infections and/or to stop virus transmission. Given 10 million doses administered per day, and a two-dose vaccination schedule, it would take 1 week to vaccinate essential workers but likely up to 7 months to vaccinate 70% of the overall population. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed framework is general but could assist Chinese policy-makers in the design of a vaccination program. Additionally, this exercise could be generalized to inform other national and regional strategies for use of COVID-19 vaccines, especially in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Immunization Programs/methods , Patient Selection , Police , Adolescent , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Ethical Theory , Female , Food Industry , Health Priorities , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , Infant , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Nursing Homes , Pandemics/prevention & control , Policy Making , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Transportation , Vaccination , Young Adult
17.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 334-339, 2020.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068155

ABSTRACT

Aim of this paper is to describe the management of an outbreak of COVID-19 in a slaughtering and meat processing plant in Bari Province (Southern Italy). At the end of the outbreak investigation, 18.4% of the employees were positive to the molecular test for SARS-CoV-2. Higher prevalence has been reported in the bovine slaughtering house and swine meat processing plant.In addition to lack of physical distancing and correct use of personal protective equipment, the spread of the virus has been eased by low level of literacy, indoor microclimate, intensive working time, and aerosol-generating procedures in specific areas of the processing plant where more positive cases have been detected. The analysis of this cluster may suggest specific actions to prevent similar outbreaks in the future.


Subject(s)
Abattoirs/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Food Handling , Food Industry/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Meat , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Abattoirs/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aerosols , Air Pollution, Indoor , Animals , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cattle , Contact Tracing , Databases, Factual , Educational Status , Equipment Contamination , Female , Food Handling/instrumentation , Food Handling/methods , Food Handling/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , Sheep , Swine
18.
Public Health Nutr ; 24(2): 321-326, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053944

ABSTRACT

The food information environment includes food advertising disseminated in various media. With the COVID-19 pandemic and the shutdown of schools, universities, non-essential commerce, public leisure areas, bars, restaurants, among others, the food information environment has changed in Brazil. People spent more time at home which led to greater exposure to television and internet advertising content. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the food production sector has invested in new ways to advertise their products that include advertising messages of support, empathy and solidarity, as well as social responsibility campaigns looking for self-promotion such as food donation and financial aids. Sponsoring online events promoted by Brazilian musicians on social media was also enhanced during the pandemic and allowed food companies to become part of the consumer's leisure and entertainment moments. The advertising strategies adopted by the food industry during the COVID-19 pandemic are used to generate market demands, influence the consumer purchase decision and increase their loyalty to the supplier brands. Consequently, individuals may have been more vulnerable to excessive consumption of ultra-processed foods during this health crisis. This commentary aims to describe the changes in the food information environment during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil and propose a pathway to promote a healthier food information environment after this health crisis. Perspectives for promoting a healthier food information environment after the pandemic are also discussed, focusing on regulating food advertising with a shared responsibility between government, the food industry, the academy and civil society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Industry , Marketing , Advertising , Brazil , Commerce , Consumer Behavior , Diet, Healthy , Fast Foods , Food Handling , Health Promotion , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Television
19.
Public Health Nutr ; 24(5): 1142-1152, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1047912

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the use of references to the COVID-19 pandemic as part of the marketing strategies used on Facebook to promote ultra-processed products. DESIGN: A search for Facebook accounts of ultra-processed products was performed using a master list of products commercialised in two online supermarkets in Uruguay. For each of the identified Facebook accounts, all the content posted from the confirmation of the first cases of COVID-19 in Uruguay, on 14 March 2020, until 1 July 2020 was recorded. Posts including mentions to COVID-19, social distancing measures or their consequences were identified and analysed using content analysis. SETTING: Uruguay, Latin America. RESULTS: A total of 135 Facebook accounts were identified, which generated a total of 1749 posts related to ultra-processed products, from which 35 % included references to COVID-19. The majority of the posts included references to prevention measures. Approximately one-third of the posts included proposals of activities to do at home, most of which were linked to a healthy lifestyle. Tips for coping with quarantine and descriptions of the charitable work undertaken by brands were also identified. CONCLUSIONS: Results from the present work provide evidence that industries of ultra-processed products have taken advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic to promote their products, create positive associations with the brands and improve their image as part of their digital marketing strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fast Foods/statistics & numerical data , Food Industry/trends , Marketing/trends , Social Media/trends , Humans , Marketing/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Uruguay
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