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1.
J Food Prot ; 84(10): 1683-1697, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810927

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN) is a global network of national food safety authorities from 190 countries, managed jointly by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) that aims to facilitate the rapid exchange of information during food safety incidents. A three-phase study of INFOSAN was launched in 2019 to characterize and examine the network as a functional community of practice and determine its value systematically and rigorously from its members' perspectives. The first two phases of the study involved analyzing the INFOSAN Community Website and surveying of all of its members. The main objective of this third and final phase of the study was to understand the experiences of a small group of INFOSAN members as they relate to various dimensions of membership. A qualitative methodology was used to provide a deeper understanding of members' experiences and supplement the results from the first two quantitative study phases. Interviews were conducted with 10 INFOSAN members from 10 geographic regions, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results offer an understanding of INFOSAN members' experiences in the context of what participation in this global network means to them and relate to five themes concerning trust, learning, health protection, sense of community, and future potential. The findings suggest that focusing on outreach to sustain personal interest, training to improve technical capacity, and advocacy to obtain political buy-in are ways in which the INFOSAN Secretariat could enable participation and create value at the individual, organizational, and national level, respectively. Such engagement could translate into more effective international communication during urgent food safety incidents and fewer cases of foodborne illness worldwide.


Subject(s)
Food Safety , Foodborne Diseases , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , World Health Organization
2.
J Food Prot ; 84(7): 1239-1251, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810920

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Cross-contamination of raw food to other surfaces, hands, and foods is a serious issue in food service. With individuals eating more meals away from home, contracting a foodborne illness from a food service establishment is an increasing concern. However, most studies have concentrated on hands or food contact surfaces and neglected atypical and unusual surfaces (surfaces that are not typically identified as a source of cross-contamination) and venues. This review was conducted to identify atypically cross-contaminated surfaces and atypical venues where cross-contamination could occur that have not been examined thoroughly in the literature. Most surfaces that could be at risk for cross-contamination are frequently touched, are rarely cleaned and sanitized, and can support the persistence and/or growth of foodborne pathogens. These surfaces include menus, spice and condiment containers, aprons and coveralls, mobile devices and tablets, and money. Venues that are explored, such as temporary events, mobile vendors, and markets, are usually limited in space or infrastructure, have low compliance with proper hand washing, and provide the opportunity for raw and ready-to-eat foods to come into contact with one another. These factors create an environment in which cross-contamination can occur and potentially impact food safety. A more comprehensive cleaning and sanitizing regime encompassing these surfaces and venues could help mitigate cross-contamination. This review highlights key surfaces and venues that have the potential to be cross-contaminated and have been underestimated or not fully investigated. These knowledge gaps indicate where further work is needed to fully understand the role of these surfaces and venues in cross-contamination and how it can be prevented.


Subject(s)
Food Services , Foodborne Diseases , Food Contamination/analysis , Food Handling , Food Microbiology , Food Safety , Hand , Hand Disinfection , Humans
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 753950, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775951

ABSTRACT

Exploring the intrinsic relationship between digital technology and the efficiency of food safety supervision contributes to a better understanding of the role of digital technology in food safety supervision and how to maximize its influence. This study employed sample data from 31 regions in China between 2015 and 2017 for an empirical analysis of the correlation between the two and to examine the moderating effects of the knowledge levels of food producers and consumers. The results show that the development of digital technology contributes to enhancing the efficiency of food safety supervision. In this process, the higher the knowledge level of consumers, the greater the positive promotional effect of digital technology. On the contrary, when the knowledge level of producers is higher, it is not conducive to enhancing the effect of digital technology on the efficiency of food safety supervision. The author holds the view that this is related to the fact that employees in the food production and manufacturing industry have insufficient moral and legal knowledge. This not only limits the effect of digital technology on enhancing the efficiency of food safety supervision, but also opens the door to illegal production for some unprincipled producers. The policy implications are that digital technology should be used to improve food safety supervision, the moral and legal knowledge of food producers should be improved, and consumers should be encouraged to use digital technology more in the pursuit of food safety. Implications for national healthcare system would be also discussed in our paper.


Subject(s)
Digital Technology , China , Food Safety , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans
4.
J Food Prot ; 85(2): 188-195, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726506

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Federally funded school meals, such as the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program, can help alleviate food insecurity. Meals served as part of these programs are required by law to be modified when medically necessary, such as food allergies and special diets. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused many schools across the United States to close, but schools quickly modified meal-serving models. The purpose of this study was to understand the experiences of school nutrition professionals relative to food safety and providing special diets through modified serving models. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of child nutrition professionals via social media recruitment and e-mails (n = 504). The survey had both closed-ended questions and one open-ended question exploring food safety and special diet accommodations. At the time of the survey, most respondents (68.3%) had been involved in COVID-19 emergency feeding for 3 to 4 weeks. Results indicated that although most child nutrition professionals did not find food safety easier or more difficult during the initial onset of COVID-19, 34.8% of respondents were not taking food temperatures for hot and cold meals during meal service and were not able to obtain (or did not have enough) equipment necessary for holding hot foods (53.0%). Most respondents (60.2%) also indicated that they were not accommodating children with special diets. Themes from the qualitative analysis indicated participants had challenges obtaining specialty items, had little time to make accommodations, or had a limited supply from vendors to accommodate these diets. To prevent food insecurity and to maintain health during the pandemic, specific solutions for at-risk populations, such as those who experience food allergies, must be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , Child , Diet , Food Safety , Humans , Meals , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , United States
5.
Meat Sci ; 187: 108748, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683423

ABSTRACT

Stated levels of concerns regarding different aspects of beef and its supply chain in the U.S. were studied for a representative sample of 1275 U.S. residents. In addition to top concerns, frequency of general beef consumption and different beef subprimal cuts were collected. Sixty-two percent of respondents indicated eating beef at least twice per week; ground beef was the most frequently purchased beef item. We find that price and food safety prevailed as the most prominent considerations for U.S. residents regarding beef and it's supply chain, though employee welfare, supply chain issues and beef availability have gained prominence in light of the severe disruptions to the industry induced by COVID-19. Concerns regarding cattle emissions, cattle welfare, beef availability and food safety were more prevalent amongst younger consumers. Marketing campaigns highlighting the industry's efforts on improving such matters may be particularly meaningful to younger age groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meat , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cattle , Consumer Behavior , Food Safety , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Toxins (Basel) ; 14(1)2022 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626257

ABSTRACT

Foodborne diseases (FBDs) represent a worldwide public health issue, given their spreadability and the difficulty of tracing the sources of contamination. This report summarises the incidence of foodborne pathogens and toxins found in food, environmental and clinical samples collected in relation to diagnosed or suspected FBD cases and submitted between 2018 and 2020 to the Food Microbiology Unit of the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Lazio e della Toscana (IZSLT). Data collected from 70 FBD investigations were analysed: 24.3% of them started with an FBD diagnosis, whereas a further 41.4% involved clinical diagnoses based on general symptomatology. In total, 5.6% of the 340 food samples analysed were positive for the presence of a bacterial pathogen, its toxins or both. Among the positive samples, more than half involved meat-derived products. Our data reveal the probable impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the number of FBD investigations conducted. In spite of the serious impact of FBDs on human health and the economy, the investigation of many foodborne outbreaks fails to identify the source of infection. This indicates a need for the competent authorities to continue to develop and implement a more fully integrated health network.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Toxins/chemistry , COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Analysis , Food Microbiology , Food Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Foodborne Diseases , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Public Health , Retrospective Studies
7.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607647

ABSTRACT

On 11 March 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) and, up to 18:37 a.m. on 9 December 2021, it has produced 268,440,530 cases and 5,299,511 deaths. This disease, in some patients, included pneumonia and shortness of breath, being transmitted through droplets and aerosols. To date, there is no scientific literature to justify transmission directly from foods. In this review, we applied the precautionary principle for the home and the food industry using the known "Five Keys to Safer Food" manual developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and extended punctually in its core information from five keys, in the light of new COVID-19 evidence, to guarantee a possible food safety tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Food Safety , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , World Health Organization
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599599

ABSTRACT

Foodborne disease events (FDEs) endanger residents' health around the world, including China. Most countries have formulated food safety regulation policies, but the effects of governmental intervention (GI) on FDEs are still unclear. So, this paper purposes to explore the effects of GI on FDEs by using Chinese provincial panel data from 2011 to 2019. The results show that: (i) GI has a significant negative impact on FDEs. Ceteris paribus, FDEs decreased by 1.3% when government expenditure on FDEs increased by 1%. (ii) By strengthening food safety standards and guiding enterprises to offer safer food, government can further improve FDEs. (iii) However, GI has a strong negative externality. Although GI alleviates FDEs in local areas, it aggravates FDEs in other areas. (iv) Compared with the eastern and coastal areas, the effects of GI on FDEs in the central, western, and inland areas are more significant. GI is conducive to ensuring Chinese health and equity. Policymakers should pay attention to two tasks in food safety regulation. Firstly, they should continue to strengthen GI in food safety issues, enhance food safety certification, and strive to ensure food safety. Secondly, they should reinforce the co-governance of regional food safety issues and reduce the negative externality of GI.


Subject(s)
Foodborne Diseases , China/epidemiology , Food Safety , Foodborne Diseases/epidemiology , Foodborne Diseases/prevention & control , Government , Humans
9.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261832, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595434

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships of food safety knowledge, attitude and eating behavior of consumers during national lockdowns in the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 157 respondents completed the online survey using a structured questionnaire worldwide. Overall, the respondents exhibited good attitude and good knowledge towards public health including food safety especially on the importance of social distancing, mask wearing, well-balanced diet, physical exercise and personal hygiene, such as hand washing during the pandemic lockdowns. A Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test the relationships among food safety knowledge, attitude and behavior under the pandemic conditions. Results showed that attitude towards food safety under the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns positively affected the eating behavior of the respondents, which exhibited a high ß (0.686) among the variables tested (p<0.05). Food safety knowledge was apparently not affected by the food safety behavior of the respondents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Food Safety , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Global Health , Hand Disinfection , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Public Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
J Food Prot ; 84(11): 1973-1989, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551720

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted the U.S. food supply and consumer behavior. Food production and processing are being disrupted as illnesses, proactive quarantines, and government-mandated movement restrictions cause labor shortages. In this environment, the food industry has been required to adopt new, additional practices to minimize the risk of COVID-19 cases and outbreaks among its workforce. Successfully overcoming these challenges requires a comprehensive approach that addresses COVID-19 transmission both within and outside the facility. Possible interventions include strategies (i) to vaccinate employees, (ii) to assure that employees practice social distancing, (iii) to assure that employees wear face coverings, (iv) to screen employees for COVID-19, (v) to assure that employees practice frequent hand washing and avoid touching their faces, (vi) to clean frequently touched surfaces, and (vii) to assure proper ventilation. Compliance with these control strategies must be verified, and an overall COVID-19 control culture must be established to implement an effective program. Despite some public misperceptions about the health risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 on foods or food packaging, both the virus biology and epidemiological data clearly support a negligible risk of COVID-19 transmission through food and food packing. However, COVID-19 pandemic-related supply chain and workforce disruptions and the shift in resources to protect food industry employees from COVID-19 may increase the actual food safety risks. The goal of this review was to describe the COVID-19 mitigation practices adopted by the food industry and the potential impact of these practices and COVID-19-related disruptions on the industry's food safety mission. A review of these impacts is necessary to ensure that the food industry is prepared to maintain a safe and nutritious food supply in the face of future global disruptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Food Safety , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Rev Sci Tech ; 40(2): 533-544, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1431210

ABSTRACT

Animal health risk assessment is one of the key tasks of Veterinary Services. There are well-established protocols created by the World Organisation for Animal Health and Codex Alimentarius Commission for assessing risk. They cover terrestrial and aquatic animals and zoonotic infectious diseases, food safety, and the environment, taking into consideration the connections between them. Significant effort has been made in developing methods to estimate the probability, and consequences, of infectious disease incursion in diseasefree countries through legal or illegal trade or via the movements of insects and wildlife. Additional efforts have been made in the design of prevention strategies and contingency plans. Concerns about possible pandemics of avian influenza continue to be important motivation for monitoring viruses for selection of vaccine candidate strains. The recent COVID-19 pandemic was zoonotic in nature and caused extensive disruption throughout the world. Tools are becoming available for quantitative food safety risk assessments for bacteria, toxins, viruses, and antimicrobial resistance genes, including tools that allow simulations for the selection of effective control options. Applying participatory techniques facilitates the conduct of risk analysis in low- and middle-income countries. In internationally established frameworks, risk assessment is the first step towards elimination of important infectious diseases in endemic countries and it is an important contributor to the reduction of disease risks. Quantitative and qualitative socio-economic and behavioural studies have been developed to design risk management options that are acceptable and sustainable for actors throughout value chains.


L'évaluation des risques pour la santé animale constitue l'une des tâches centrales des Services vétérinaires. L'Organisation mondiale de la santé animale et la Commission du Codex Alimentarius ont élaboré à cet effet des protocoles d'évaluation des risques désormais bien établis. Ces protocoles recouvrent les stratégies de gestion du risque qui soient à la fois acceptables et applicables durablement par les acteurs intervenant à chaque point des chaînes de valeur.


La determinación del riesgo zoosanitario es uno de los principales cometidos de los Servicios Veterinarios. Ya existen arraigados protocolos de determinación del riesgo, elaborados por la Organización Mundial de Sanidad Animal y la Comisión del Codex Alimentarius, que abarcan desde los animales terrestres y acuáticos hasta las enfermedades infecciosas zoonóticas, pasando por las cuestiones ambientales y de inocuidad de los alimentos, y tienen en cuenta las conexiones existentes entre todos estos factores. Se ha dedicado un gran esfuerzo a dar con métodos para calcular la probabilidad y las consecuencias de que una enfermedad infecciosa penetre en un país exento de ella a resultas del comercio, ya sea legal o ilegal, o del desplazamiento de.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Animals , Animals, Wild , COVID-19/veterinary , Food Safety , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf ; 20(5): 4212, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416244
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 729816, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413325

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) amongst university students in Jordan and changes in food-related behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Correlation between food safety KAP scores and general characteristics of university students was also evaluated. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted where an Internet-based questionnaire was distributed through social media platforms. The sample consisted of 1,739 respondents from 29 Jordanian universities. The participants completed a 58-item questionnaire covering demographical characteristics and different food safety aspects which were namely "COVID-19 food-related attributes," "food cooking and storage," "personal hygiene." "cross-contamination prevention/disinfection procedures." and "restaurant hygiene." Descriptive statistics, Chi square tests and binary logistic analysis were used to assess the data. Results: The sample consisted of 67.2% females with a mean age of 21.3 ± 1.8 years. The average overall score of the tested aspects was 14.1/34.0 which corresponds to 41.3% of the questions being answered correctly. The percentage of correct answers of "COVID-19 food-related attributes," "food cooking and storage," "cross-contamination prevention/disinfection procedures," "personal hygiene" and "restaurant hygiene" was 56.8, 36.6, 28.4, 44.6. and 36.9%, respectively. A significant (P <0.05) association between respondents' food safety KAP scores and gender, marital status, university degree, employment status, self-rating of food safety knowledge, and the source of food safety information. Conclusion: University students in Jordan had insufficient KAP scores which is a concerning trend during the pandemic. Teaching fundamentals of food safety in the form of short courses/ lectures is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Universities , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Food Safety , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Young Adult
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378278

ABSTRACT

Food safety is related to public health, social welfare, and human survival, all of which are important and pressing areas of concern all over the world. The government plays an increasingly important role in the supervision of food safety. The role of the government, however, is also controversial. Using provincial panel data of China from 2005 to 2015, the present study intends to shed light on the associations between government intervention and food safety performance under two scenarios of local government-competition and noncompetition. This will be accomplished through an exploratory spatial data analysis and a spatial econometric model. The results reveal negative associations between food safety performance and government intervention without considering local government competition. As was also observed, government intervention not only inhibits the improvement of food safety in the region, but also has a negative spatial spillover effect on food safety in neighboring provinces. This is the result after considering government competition, thus, showing the competitive strategic interaction of the "race to the bottom". Further analysis reveals that, if geographically similar regions are selected as reference objects, the food safety performance of each province will have a stronger tendency to compete for the better. If regions with similar economic development levels are selected as reference objects, food safety performance will have a stronger tendency to compete for the worse. This work provides new evidence for the relationships between government intervention and food safety, and, also, proposes some insightful implications for policymakers for governing food safety.


Subject(s)
Economic Development , Local Government , China , Food Safety , Humans , Spatial Analysis
15.
J Food Prot ; 85(2): 188-195, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365777

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Federally funded school meals, such as the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program, can help alleviate food insecurity. Meals served as part of these programs are required by law to be modified when medically necessary, such as food allergies and special diets. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused many schools across the United States to close, but schools quickly modified meal-serving models. The purpose of this study was to understand the experiences of school nutrition professionals relative to food safety and providing special diets through modified serving models. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of child nutrition professionals via social media recruitment and e-mails (n = 504). The survey had both closed-ended questions and one open-ended question exploring food safety and special diet accommodations. At the time of the survey, most respondents (68.3%) had been involved in COVID-19 emergency feeding for 3 to 4 weeks. Results indicated that although most child nutrition professionals did not find food safety easier or more difficult during the initial onset of COVID-19, 34.8% of respondents were not taking food temperatures for hot and cold meals during meal service and were not able to obtain (or did not have enough) equipment necessary for holding hot foods (53.0%). Most respondents (60.2%) also indicated that they were not accommodating children with special diets. Themes from the qualitative analysis indicated participants had challenges obtaining specialty items, had little time to make accommodations, or had a limited supply from vendors to accommodate these diets. To prevent food insecurity and to maintain health during the pandemic, specific solutions for at-risk populations, such as those who experience food allergies, must be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Services , Child , Diet , Food Safety , Humans , Meals , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , United States
16.
Am J Health Promot ; 36(1): 194-196, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348263

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During a pandemic, persons might experience worry because of threats (real or perceived), or as part of stress-related reactions. We aimed to provide insight into Americans' worry about food during COVID-19. Design, Subjects, Measures: Online survey data from June 2020 (n = 4,053 U.S. adults; 62.7% response rate) was used to assess 2 outcomes: worry about food availability (FA); food safety (FS). Adults with missing information about FA and FS were excluded from analysis (final n = 3,652). ANALYSIS: We used descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression to examine characteristics associated with the outcomes and estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for associations between sociodemographic variables and outcomes. RESULTS: 58.3% of respondents reported worry about FA; 57.5% about FS, with higher odds of worry for FA and FS (versus referents) in lower income households (FA: aOR = 1.76 95%CI [1.30, 2.39]; FS: 1.84[1.35, 2.51]); unemployed (1.54[1.05, 2.28]; 1.90[1.26,2.81]); non-Hispanic Black (1.55[1.14,2.12]); 2.25[1.65,3.07]); Hispanic (1.39[1.06,1.82]; 1.94[1.46,2.56]). CONCLUSION: Findings highlight the importance of strategies to reduce consumer worry about FA and FS and negative food behaviors, and the need for continued access to hunger safety net programs, which could have positive effects on nutrition security.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Food Safety , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , United States/epidemiology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(15)2021 07 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346484

ABSTRACT

Food systems are at the center of global environmental, social, and economic challenges such as resource scarcity, ecosystem degradation, and climate change [...].


Subject(s)
Ecosystem , Food Supply , Agriculture , Climate Change , Food , Food Safety , Humans
18.
Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf ; 20(5): 4881-4905, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345884

ABSTRACT

The development of biodegradable packaging, based on agro-industrial plant products and by-products, can transform waste into products with high added value and reduce the use of conventional nonrenewable packaging. Green-based active packaging has a variety of compounds such as antimicrobials, antioxidants, aromatics, among others. These compounds interact with packaged products to improve food quality and safety and favor the migration of bioactive compounds from the polymeric matrix to food. The interest in the potential hygienic-sanitary benefit of these packages has been intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic, which made the population more aware of the relevant role of packaging for protection and conservation of food. It is estimated that the pandemic scenario expanded food packaging market due to shift in eating habits and an increase in online purchases. The triad health, sustainability, and circular economy is a trend in the development of packaging. It is necessary to minimize the consumption of natural resources, reduce the use of energy, avoid the generation of waste, and emphasize the creation of social and environmental values. These ideas underpin the transition from the emphasis on the more subjective discourse to the emphasis on the more practical method of thinking about the logic of production and use of sustainable packaging. Presently, we briefly review some trends and economic issues related to biodegradable materials for food packaging; the development and application of bio-based active films; some opportunities beyond COVID-19 for food packaging segment; and perspectives in circular economy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Packaging , Food Safety , Recycling , Conservation of Natural Resources/methods , Food Packaging/economics , Food Packaging/methods , Food Safety/methods , Humans , Recycling/methods
19.
J Food Prot ; 85(1): 73-84, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341852

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In light of extended stay-at-home periods during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, recent societal trends have revealed an increased use of online media to remain connected. Simultaneously, interests in at-home cooking and baking, particularly of "comfort foods" have increased. Because flour is a crucial component in many of these products, we analyze how the U.S. public, in social and online media spaces, references "flour" and its use. We also quantify the share of media mentions about flour that are devoted to flour-related food safety risks and/or risk mitigation. It was found that the volume of mentions about flour and its use fluctuate seasonally, often increasing ahead of the winter holiday season (November to December). Further, the volume of interest rapidly increased in March 2020 when stay-at-home orders were issued. The share of media devoted to flour-related food safety risks or associated illness was extremely small but generally corresponded with flour recall announcements or other public risk communications. Overall, the interest in flour and its use remains seasonal and predictably related to societal trends, such as increased baking at home during the holidays or 2020 stay-at-home orders. However, awareness of flour-related food safety risks seems largely absent on the basis of online media data collection and analysis, except in immediate reactions to flour recalls. This study suggests that more flour safety education programs may be desired to support consumers' informed decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Flour , Attention , Food Safety , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(12)2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282479

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this research is to determine whether users' social interaction tie and trust have a mediating effect on the willingness to use the online healthcare community (OHC) platform on an ongoing basis to respond to food safety crises and monitor food safety practices. During the three-month survey, we conducted an online investigation of users who had experience sharing on the OHC platform and were concerned about food safety. Thereby, three hundred and fifty-two valid questionnaires were received and partial least squares was adopted in this study to test the proposed hypotheses. The empirical results show that perceived critical mass, image, and para-social interaction strengthen the social interaction tie between users and the food safety platform. In addition, this study found that social interaction tie and trust of OHC platform users increased users' willingness to continue using the OHC platform. This research provides OHC platform managers with an in-depth understanding of online social interactions on food safety pages. Moreover, the results of this study can help food business owners, government regulators, hospitals, and physicians to improve the way they use the Web for opinion-led food safety crises and provide insight into the intent of promoting the ongoing use of OHC platforms.


Subject(s)
Food Safety , Intention , Delivery of Health Care , Law Enforcement , Surveys and Questionnaires
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