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1.
ANZ J Surg ; 93(5): 1408-1409, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241247

Subject(s)
Fractures, Bone , Humans
2.
Acta Orthop Belg ; 89(1): 1-5, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234432

ABSTRACT

Sars-CoV2/COVID-19 pandemic created a national emergency in Ireland. Our institution implemented a virtual trauma assessment clinic to reduce attendance to our district hospital which was stimulated by the development of 'safe-distanced' care. The audit aimed to evaluate the impact of our trauma assessment clinic on care provision and presentation to hospital. All patients were managed according to the newly implemented virtual trauma assessment clinic protocol. Data was prospectively collected over a 6.5 week period from 23rd March 2020 to 7th May 2020. These referrals were reviewed twice weekly by a Consultant-led multidisciplinary team. 142 patients were referred to the virtual trauma assessment clinic. Mean age of referrals was 33.04 years. 43% (n=61) were male patients. Overall 32.4% (n=46) of new referrals were discharged directly to their family doctor. 30.3% (n=43) were discharged for physiotherapy follow up. 36.6% (n=52) required presentation to the hospital for further clinical review and 0.7% (n=1) was admitted for surgical intervention. Overall, this represents a reduction of 63% of patients attending the hospital. A simple virtual trauma assessment clinic model resulted in significant reduction in unnecessary attendance at face-to-face fracture clinics enhancing patient and staff safety during a global pandemic. This virtual trauma assessment clinic model has allowed the mobilisation of staff to assist with other essential duties in other areas of our hospital without compromising care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Humans , Male , Adult , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
3.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e067786, 2023 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326662

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Older people were at particular risk of morbidity and mortality during COVID-19. Consequently, they experienced formal (externally imposed) and informal (self-imposed) periods of social isolation and quarantine. This is hypothesised to have led to physical deconditioning, new-onset disability and frailty. Disability and frailty are not routinely collated at population level but are associated with increased risk of falls and fractures, which result in hospital admissions. First, we will examine incidence of falls and fractures during COVID-19 (January 2020-March 2022), focusing on differences between incidence over time against expected rates based on historical data, to determine whether there is evidence of new-onset disability and frailty. Second, we will examine whether those with reported SARS-CoV-2 were at higher risk of falls and fractures. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study uses the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Public Health Data Asset, a linked population-level dataset combining administrative health records with sociodemographic data of the 2011 Census and National Immunisation Management System COVID-19 vaccination data for England. Administrative hospital records will be extracted based on specific fracture-centric International Classification of Diseases-10 codes in years preceding COVID-19 (2011-2020). Historical episode frequency will be used to predict expected admissions during pandemic years using time series modelling, if COVID-19 had not occurred. Those predicted admission figures will be compared with actual admissions to assess changes in hospital admissions due to public health measures comprising the pandemic response. Hospital admissions in prepandemic years will be stratified by age and geographical characteristics and averaged, then compared with pandemic year admissions to assess more granular changes. Risk modelling will assess risk of experiencing a fall, fracture or frail fall and fracture, if they have reported a positive case of COVID-19. The combination of these techniques will provide insight into changes in hospital admissions from the COVID-19 pandemic. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has approval from the National Statistician's Data Ethics Advisory Committee (NSDEC(20)12). Results will be made available to other researchers via academic publication and shared via the ONS website.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Frailty , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Frailty/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , COVID-19 Vaccines , Electronic Health Records , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Hospitals
4.
Can J Surg ; 66(3): E282-E288, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315294

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The association between elbow fractures and outdoor playgrounds has always been anecdotal. We sought to determine the impact of closing outdoor playgrounds and other play areas during the COVID-19 lockdown on elbow fractures in a pediatric population. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all elbow fractures from a single pediatric referral hospital between 2016 and 2020 for the months of April and May. The months chosen corresponded to the COVID-19 lockdown during which outdoor playgrounds were closed. Inclusion criteria were elbow fracture diagnosis based on radiography and age younger than 18 years. Fracture type, where the injury occurred and the mechanism of injury were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 370 fractures were reported, with an average of 83 (95% confidence interval [CI] 83-84) per year for 2016-19 and only 36 recorded in 2020. The average annual number of fractures before 2020 was 17 (95% CI 16-17) for schools, and 33 (95% CI 31-34) for outdoor playgrounds, including 22 (95% CI 21-24) falls from playground structures. No fracture was reported in schools in 2020, and only 3 were reported from outdoor playgrounds (including 1 associated with falling from playground structures). CONCLUSION: We found an association between elbow fractures in a pediatric population and outdoor playground accessibility, but also with indoor public locations. Our findings emphasize the importance of safety measures in those facilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elbow Fractures , Fractures, Bone , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/etiology
5.
Adv Ther ; 40(6): 2693-2709, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314274

ABSTRACT

Since their approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1989, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have become one of the most highly utilized drugs in the United States, assuming a position as one of the top 10 most prescribed medications in the country. The purpose of PPIs is to limit the amount of gastric acid secreted by the parietal cells via irreversible inhibition of the H+/K+-ATPase pump, therefore maintaining an elevated gastric acid pH of greater than 4 for 15-21 h. Even though PPIs have many clinical uses, they are not without their adverse effects, mimicking achlorhydria. Besides electrolyte abnormalities and vitamin deficiencies, long-term use of PPIs has been linked to acute interstitial nephritis, bone fractures, poor COVID-19 infection outcomes, pneumonia, and possibly an increase in all-cause mortality. The causality between PPI use and increased mortality and disease risk can be questioned since most studies are observational. Confounding variables can greatly affect an observational study and explain the wide-ranging associations with the use of PPIs. Patients on PPIs are generally older, obese, sicker with a higher number of baseline morbidities, and on more medications than the compared PPI non-users. These findings suggest that PPI users are at a higher risk of mortality and complications based on pre-existing conditions. This narrative review aims to update readers on the concerning effects that proton pump inhibitor use can have on patients and give providers a resource to create informed decisions on appropriate PPI use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Humans , Proton Pump Inhibitors/adverse effects , Fractures, Bone/drug therapy , Kidney , Observational Studies as Topic
6.
ANZ J Surg ; 93(3): 656-662, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307741

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the optimal management of clavicle fractures, with advocates of both operative and non-operative management. The objective of this study is to assess the trends in the management of clavicle fractures in Australia over the past two decades. METHODS: The incidence of surgical fixation of clavicle fractures from 2001 to 2020 was analysed using the Australian Medicare Benefits Schedule database, reflective of operations performed on privately insured patients, thus excluding public patients and compensable cases. An offset term was utilized with data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics to account for population changes over the study period. RESULTS: A total of 17 089 procedures for the management of clavicle fractures were performed from 2001 to 2020. The incidence of operative intervention increased from 1.87 per 100 000 in 2001 to a peak of 6.63 per 100 000 in 2016. An overall increase was seen in males (310%) and females (347%) over the study period, as well as across all age groups. A greater proportion of operative interventions was performed on males (n = 14 075, 82%) than females (n = 3014, 18%, P < 0.001). The greatest increase in intervention was noted in those aged 65 or older (14% increase per year, 95% CI 11%-17%, P < 0.05). In 2020, the incidence of operative intervention decreased to a level last seen in 2013. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of operative interventions for clavicle fractures has increased in Australia over the 20-year study period. This increase is in keeping with recent evidence suggesting several advantages when displaced mid-shaft clavicle fractures are operatively managed.


Subject(s)
Fracture Fixation, Internal , Fractures, Bone , Male , Female , Humans , Aged , Fracture Fixation, Internal/methods , Clavicle/surgery , Treatment Outcome , Australia/epidemiology , National Health Programs , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/surgery , Fracture Healing
7.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e069543, 2023 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298680

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Falls among older adults are associated with adverse sequelae including fractures, chronic pain and disability, which can lead to loss of independence and increased risks of nursing home admissions. The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly increased the uptake of telehealth, but the effectiveness of virtual, home-based fall prevention programmes is not clearly known. We aim to synthesise the trials on telerehabilitation and home-based falls prevention programmes to determine their effectiveness in reducing falls and adverse outcomes, as well as to describe the safety risks associated with telerehabilitation. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This protocol was developed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P). Database searches from inception to August 2022 will be conducted without language restrictions of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid HealthSTAR, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Physiotherapy EvidenceDatabase (PEDro) and the Cochrane Library. Grey literature including major geriatrics conference proceedings will be reviewed. Using Covidence software, two independent reviewers will in duplicate determine the eligibility of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Eligible RCTs will compare telerehabilitation and home-based fall prevention programmes to usual care among community-dwelling older adults and will report at least one efficacy outcome: falls, fractures, hospitalisations, mortality or quality of life; or at least one safety outcome: pain, myalgias, dyspnoea, syncope or fatigue. Secondary outcomes include functional performance in activities of daily living, balance and endurance. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. DerSimonian-Laird random effects models will be used for the meta-analysis. Heterogeneity will be assessed using the I2 statistic and Cochran's Q statistic. We will assess publication bias using the Egger's test. Prespecified subgroup analyses and univariate meta-regression will be used. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required. The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42022356759.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Telerehabilitation , Humans , Aged , Independent Living , COVID-19/prevention & control , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic
8.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 11(5): 362-374, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295278

ABSTRACT

Over the past 100 years, many major breakthroughs and discoveries have occurred in relation to vitamin D research. These developments include the cure of rickets in 1919, the discovery of vitamin D compounds, advances in vitamin D molecular biology, and improvements in our understanding of endocrine control of vitamin D metabolism. Furthermore, recommended daily allowances for vitamin D have been established and large clinical trials of vitamin D, aimed at clarifying the effect of Vitamin D in the prevention of multiple diseases, have been completed. However, disappointingly, these clinical trials have not fulfilled the expectations many had 10 years ago. In almost every trial, various doses and routes of administration did not show efficacy of vitamin D in preventing fractures, falls, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, asthma, and respiratory infections. Although concerns about side-effects of long-term high-dose treatments, such as hypercalcaemia and nephrocalcinosis, have been around for four decades, some trials from the past 5 years have had new and unexpected adverse events. These adverse events include increased fractures, falls, and hospitalisations in older people (aged >65 years). Several of these clinical trials were powered appropriately for a primary outcome but did not include dose response studies and were underpowered for secondary analyses. Furthermore, more attention should be paid to the safety of high doses of vitamin D supplementation, particularly in older people. In addition, despite universal recommendations by osteoporosis societies for combining calcium supplements with vitamin D there remains insufficient data about their efficacy and effect on fracture risk in the highest risk groups. More trials are needed for people with severe vitamin D deficiency (ie, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D <25nmol/L [10ng/mL]). In this Personal View, we summarise and discuss some of the major discoveries and controversies in the field of vitamin D.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Fractures, Bone , Osteoporosis , Vitamin D Deficiency , Humans , Aged , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/prevention & control , Osteoporosis/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements
10.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 280(7): 3453-3459, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305636

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Pyrotechnics are a long-standing tradition at the turn of the year. There are little data available on New Year's Eve-associated ORL injuries. Due to restrictions during the Corona pandemic, the handling of fireworks and meetings on New Year's Eve 2020-2022 had been significantly changed. Our aim was to analyze first data about New Year's Eve-associated ORL injuries. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 16 turns of the year (2006-2022) at a University ORL department was performed. The 2 recent years were influenced by the changes and restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Of 343 emergency presentations, 69 presented with New Year's Eve-associated reasons (20%). 72% were male, 15.9% were underage. 74% presented for fireworks-related injuries, 19% due to violent altercations. Noise trauma was present in 71%. The average number of New Year's Eve-associated emergency patients per year and the average total number of patients were reduced by more than half under COVID-19 pandemic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: New Year's Eve-associated ORL injuries range from inner ear trauma to midface fractures. Long-term damage may include hearing loss and tinnitus. These results shall support the responsible use of fireworks even after the end of the special regulations of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Otolaryngology , Humans , Male , Female , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
11.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 80(8): 487-494, 2023 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304774

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed medications. Various adverse clinical effects of PPIs have been reported in the literature, particularly over the past decade. The purpose of this article is to review published data primarily describing adverse effects associated with PPI use and to help clinicians determine which patients may still benefit from therapy despite safety concerns. SUMMARY: Associations between PPIs and the following have been described: bone fracture, acute and chronic kidney disease, gastrointestinal infections, deficiencies in vitamin B12 and magnesium, and coronavirus disease 2019 and respiratory infections. For inclusion in this review, studies must have evaluated potential adverse events associated with PPIs as a primary or secondary objective. Increased risks of bone fracture, acute and chronic kidney disease, gastrointestinal infections, and magnesium deficiency were consistently reported, albeit mostly in studies involving low-quality data (case-control and/or observational studies) and subject to bias. In the only pertinent randomized controlled trial to date, chronic pantoprazole use was associated with a greater risk of enteric infections relative to placebo use; there was no significant between-group difference in any other adverse event evaluated. PPIs continue to be recommended by the American College of Gastroenterology as a first-line treatment for management of gastroesophageal reflux disease and in the acute period following upper gastrointestinal and ulcer bleeding. CONCLUSION: Higher-quality data is needed to better understand PPI-associated risks of the adverse effects listed above. Until then, clinicians may consider greater vigilance with PPI use; however, the data does not demonstrate a need for wide adoption of de-escalation strategies solely out of safety concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Proton Pump Inhibitors/adverse effects , Gastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced , Fractures, Bone/chemically induced , Risk Assessment , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
12.
Ir Med J ; 116(No.1): 10, 2023 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271708

ABSTRACT

The virtual fracture clinic (VFC) enables the safe, cost-effective delivery of high-quality patient-centred fracture care, whilst reducing hospital footfall. Within our institution, an Outreach VFC was launched, accepting a pre-defined range of trauma referrals from the outreach centre's emergency department (ED). The initial nine months' worth of cases referred to the Outreach VFC were assessed. The injury pattern, time to review, treatment plan and discharge destination of each referred patient were examined. A total of 822 patients were referred to the Outreach VFC during its initial nine months in operation. Owing to COVID-19-related alterations in the patient pathway, 58.1% of patients were referred on to fracture clinic/ED, with 34.4% of patients being referred for physiotherapy input. 44.9% of patients were reviewed at the Outreach VFC within 72 hours of ED presentation, with 88.6% of patients reviewed within 7 days. The Outreach VFC pilot initiative saved the Dublin Midlands Hospitals Group approximately €83,022 over nine months. The Outreach VFC model represents a novel approach to trauma care delivery with advantages for patient and hospital alike. Rural communities serve to benefit from its future implementation and the remote management of orthopaedic trauma. The Outreach VFC model provides a means of delivering safe and timely orthopaedic care whilst maintaining high levels of patient satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Humans , Fractures, Bone/therapy , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Patient Satisfaction , Referral and Consultation
13.
Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg ; 29(3): 310-315, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Earthquakes are natural disasters that threaten human life and cause loss of life and property in a very short time. In our study, we aim to carry out the medical analysis of the earthquake victims who came to our hospital after the Earthquake in the Aegean Sea and to share our clinical experiences. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed patients the medical data records of earthquake victims brought to our hospital or the injured who applied due to the Aegean Sea earthquake. Patients demographic data, their complaints and diagnoses, hour of admission, their clinical courses, hospital arrangements (admission, discharge, and transfer), time spent until the operation, anesthesia methods, surgical intervantions, intensive care needs, crush syndrome, presence of acute renal failure, number of dialysis, mortality, and mor-bidity were reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 152 patients were brought to our hospital due to the earthquake. The most intense period of admission to the emergency department was the 1st 24-36 h. Mortality rate was found to be higher depending on the increase of age. While the most common cause of admission for the mortal earthquake survivors was to be trapped in the wreckage, the survivors applied for other reasons as well such as falling down. The most common type of fracture observed in survivors was the lower extremity fractures. CONCLUSION: Epidemiological studies can make an important contribution to the management and organization of the future earthquake-related injuries by healthcare institutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Earthquakes , Fractures, Bone , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Universities , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
14.
Ortop Traumatol Rehabil ; 24(6): 363-373, 2022 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2231964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ankle joint injuries are an important orthopedic issue due to their high incidence and the variety of treatment methods available. This study assessed the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the epidemiology and treatment of ankle joint injuries. There is lack of papers which address this problem. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study compared epidemiological data on ankle joint injuries in adults and children collected during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic (2020) and a corresponding prepandemic period (2019). Epidemiological data, demographic data, treatment methods, hospital stay duration, and injury-to-surgery time were analyzed. RESULTS: The total number of patients hospitalized for ankle fractures in the evaluated pandemic period was lower by 34% than that in the corresponding prepandemic period in 2019. The pediatric patient subpopulation showed a 70% decline during the analyzed period of COVID-19 pandemic. The number of hospitalized females declined by 12%, and the number of hospitalized males dropped by 53%. CONCLUSIONS: 1. Our study showed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the epidemiology and treatment of ankle joint injuries. 2. The COVID-19 pandemic effected a decrease in the number of patients with ankle joint injuries, particularly pediatric and male patients with these injuries. 3. National lockdown measures had a considerable effect on lowering the numbers of pediatric patients with ankle joint injuries treated conservatively. 4. Importantly, the tendency can be noted among orthopedic surgeons and emergency room doctors to more readily qualify orthopedic patients for a trial of conservative treatment. This only prolongs the duration of treatment and time to the ultimate therapeutic surgery.


Subject(s)
Ankle Injuries , COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Female , Child , Humans , Male , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Ankle Joint , Communicable Disease Control , Ankle Injuries/epidemiology , Ankle Injuries/surgery , Retrospective Studies
15.
J Orthop Res ; 41(7): 1464-1470, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2173257

ABSTRACT

Bicycle utilization continues to increase annually, and this trend was recently accelerated by the coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic. There is limited epidemiologic data, however, regarding the prevalence and nature of bicycle-related injuries. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize trends in bicycle-related injuries. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried for bicycle-related injuries from 2012 to 2021. Patient demographic and injury data were collected and analyzed to describe trends in incidence, patient demographics, and injury patterns associated with an emergency department encounter for a bicycle-related injury. There were an estimated 4,666,491 (95% confidence interval: 4,661,472-4,671,510) bicycle-related injuries from 2012 to 2021. The incidence of these injuries has significantly decreased over time (R = -0.983, R2 = 0.967, p < 0.001). However, the rate of injury in elderly patients increased over time. Injuries occurred most often during summer months (36%) and on weekend days (31.9%). Males and younger patients were more commonly injured. Head injuries were the most commonly affected body part among all age groups. Fractures were the most common injury type overall. Upper extremity injuries were more common than the lower extremity. Despite increased public bicycle utilization, there is a significant downtrend in bicycle-related injuries over the last decade. Injuries among elderly patients are becoming more common, who demonstrate a high rate of fracture and head injury. Fractures and head injuries were the most common injuries among all age groups, highlighting the importance of bicycle safety initiatives and helmet-wearing regardless of age.


Subject(s)
Craniocerebral Trauma , Fractures, Bone , Male , Humans , Aged , Incidence , Bicycling/injuries , Craniocerebral Trauma/epidemiology , Craniocerebral Trauma/etiology , Head Protective Devices/adverse effects , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Fractures, Bone/complications
16.
Acta Chir Orthop Traumatol Cech ; 89(6): 435-440, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2169609

ABSTRACT

A 13-year-old girl suffered fracture of her left clavicle. A figure-of-8 bandage was placed during initial treatment. Six days after trauma her distal arm, elbow and proximal forearm were swollen, pain and tenderness of distal part of brachial vein was recognized during clinical examination. Duplex ultrasonography revealed partial thrombosis of the brachial vein. Bandage was immediately removed and administration of LMWH (enoxaparin) was started. Complete recanalization was achieved after a few days. The fracture was healed without further complication, patient was without sonographic and clinical signs of post-thrombotic syndrome. The second case report describes a 14-year-old boy. Initially, the fixation was a figure-of-8 bandage. 5 days after the injury he had swollen arm and elbow on the injured side, according to duplex ultrasonography deep venous thrombosis of the axillary and the brachial vein was recognized. There was only partial recanalization at the first sonographic follow up, the patient was converted to Warfarin for 3 months after injury after initial LMWH therapy. At the last follow-up, fracture of the left clavicle was healed and there were no DUSG or clinical signs of post-thrombotic syndrome. Key words: clavicle, deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity, anticoagulant therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Venous Thrombosis , Humans , Male , Child , Female , Adolescent , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Conservative Treatment/adverse effects , Clavicle/diagnostic imaging , Clavicle/injuries , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Fractures, Bone/complications , Fractures, Bone/therapy
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099499

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) can significantly reduce postoperative quality of life and impair the recovery of older adult patients with lower-limb fractures, and its relationship with methods of anesthesia remains inconclusive. Using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan, this study examined the data of patients who received surgical management for lower-limb fractures and compared those who underwent general anesthesia (GA) with those who underwent regional anesthesia (RA) in terms of their incidence of acute upper and lower respiratory infection during the one-month postoperative period. The study also identified related risk factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Approximately two million patients were randomly sampled from the NHIRD registry. We identified and enrolled patients with lower-limb fractures who were over 60 years old and underwent GA or RA during surgeries conducted between 2010 and 2017. We divided these patients into two groups for further analysis. The outcome of this study was the development of ARI during the one-month postoperative period. RESULTS: In total, 45,032 patients (GA group, 19,580 patients; RA group, 25,452 patients) with a mean age of 75.0 ± 8.9 years were included in our study. The incidence of postoperative ARI within one month of surgery was 8.0% (1562 patients) in the GA group and 9.5% (2412 patients) in the RA group, revealing a significant difference. The significant risk factors for the incidence of ARI were the application of RA for surgery, older age, hypertension, liver disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A subgroup analysis revealed that the RA method was associated with a significantly higher ARI incidence relative to the GA method among patients aged between 60 and 80 years, among male patients, among the patients with or without any comorbidity and among the patients without COPD. CONCLUSION: The incidence of postoperative ARI within one month of surgery was higher among older patients with lower-limb fractures who received RA for surgery than among those who received GA for surgery. The other major risk factors for ARI were older age, hypertension, liver disease, and COPD. Therefore, we should focus on patients with a high risk of developing ARI, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Spinal , COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Hypertension , Leg Injuries , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Male , Aged , Middle Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anesthesia, Spinal/adverse effects , Incidence , Quality of Life , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/surgery , Lower Extremity/surgery , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Hypertension/complications , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
18.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 42(10): 582-588, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082850

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic affected pediatric fracture injury patterns and volume. There is a paucity of research evaluating this trend throughout the pandemic and also follow-up to orthopaedic subspecialty care after emergency fracture management. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study reviewed patients 2 to 18 years of age presenting for fracture care to an urban pediatric emergency department. We assessed patient demographics, clinical care, and follow-up to surgical subspecialist. Time periods investigated included March 30 to September 4, 2020 (pandemic), March 30 to September 4, 2019, and March 30 to September 4, 2018 (prepandemic). Subanalysis within the pandemic was during the "stay-at-home order" verses the phased re-opening of the state. Descriptive statistical analysis, Pearson's χ 2 or Fisher exact tests, and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed. RESULTS: In this population, fractures overall declined by 40% (n=211) during the pandemic compared with 2019 (n=349) and 28% compared with 2018 (n=292). Lower extremity fractures accounted for a greater percentage of injuries during the pandemic compared with prepandemic. Time to surgical subspecialty follow-up was shortest during the 2020 pandemic peak at 9 days and was significantly longer during phased reopening (phase 1: 18 d, P =0.001; phase 2: 14 d, P =0.005). These patterns were also consistent for days to repeat imaging. CONCLUSIONS: We found differences in fracture prevalence, mechanisms, and follow-up care during the pandemic. Time to subspecialty follow-up care was longer during pandemic phased reopening despite overall fewer fractures. Plans to absorb postponed visits and efficiently engage redeployed staff may be necessary to address difficulties in follow-up orthopaedic management during public health crises. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , Aftercare , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
19.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 6(9)2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2057254

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 disrupted public transit and led to increased reliance on alternative modes of transportation (AMTs) internationally. This study hypothesizes that public interest and fracture injuries associated with AMTs increased during COVID-19 in the United States. METHODS: Monthly Google search probabilities and the number of fracture injuries associated with bicycles, scooters, skateboards/longboards, rollerblades, electric bicycles, and electric micromobility vehicles were collected from January 2017 to December 2021. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to assess differences in search probabilities and fracture injuries between 2021, 2020, and 2019. Linear regression was used to study the relationship between search probabilities and number of fracture injuries. RESULTS: For bicycles, skateboards/longboards, electric bicycles, and electric micromobility vehicles, search probabilities and fracture injuries were higher in 2021 and 2020 compared with 2019, except for bicycle fractures in 2021 (P < 0.05). For every AMT, except roller skates, search probability had an explanatory effect on fracture injuries (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Online interest in AMTs and associated fracture injuries increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Excess fractures seem to be stabilizing as of December 2021, but online search volumes may be used to inform the allocation of orthopaedic trauma resources during future surges in COVID-19 and other epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone , COVID-19/epidemiology , Electricity , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Transportation , United States/epidemiology
20.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg ; 142(10): 2747-2753, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035041

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The popularity of cycling in the United Kingdom is increasing, with a further rise likely due to recent government cycling promotion schemes. This study aims to characterise fractures sustained due to cycling-related collisions in patients presenting to a Major Trauma Centre, in the region with the highest cycling rates in the United Kingdom. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of cycling injuries presenting to our centre between January 2012 and December 2020 was performed using a prospectively collected electronic database. Comparison of fracture characteristics was made according to patient age and mechanism of injury (collision with a motorised vehicle versus collision with a non-motorised object.). RESULTS: Of the 737 patients who suffered a cycling-related injury, 292 (39.6%) suffered at least 1 fracture to the appendicular skeleton. Overall, fractures were most commonly seen in those over 50 years of age. Upper limb fractures were more common than lower limb fractures. Fractures sustained during motorised injuries were more likely to require surgical intervention than those sustained during non-motorised collisions. CONCLUSION: This study provides valuable information regarding the nature, epidemiology and treatment of fractures sustained following cycling-related accidents, adding to the paucity of similar literature in the field. Given the likely increase in future cycling uptake, our results are important to clinicians treating patients with cycling-related injuries and policymakers designing safety interventions.


Subject(s)
Fractures, Bone , Orthopedics , Accidents, Traffic , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Fractures, Bone/surgery , Humans , Injury Severity Score , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Trauma Centers
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