Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 36
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0283596, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300347

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were 1) to investigate the prevalence and co-existence of frailty and malnutrition and 2) to identify factors related to frailty (including malnutrition) according to the level of frailty. METHODS: Data collection was conducted from July 11, 2021, to January 23, 2022, in 558 older adults residing in 16 long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in Korea. The FRAIL-NH and Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form were used to measure frailty and nutrition, respectively. The data analysis included descriptive statistics and a multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 83.68 (± 7.39) years. Among 558 participants, 37 (6.6%), 274 (49.1%), and 247 (44.3%) were robust, prefrail, and frail, respectively. At the same time, 75.8% were categorized as having malnutrition status (malnourished: 18.1%; risk of malnutrition: 57.7%), and 40.9% had co-existing malnutrition and frailty. In the multivariate analysis, malnutrition was identified as the major frailty-related factor. Compared with a normal nutritional status, the incidence of frailty in the malnutrition group was 10.35 times (95% CI: 3.78-28.36) higher than the incidence of robustness and 4.80 times (95% CI: 2.69-8.59) higher than the incidence of prefrail. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of frailty and malnutrition, and their co-existence, among older adults residing in LTCFs was high. Malnutrition is a major factor that increases the incidence of frailty. Therefore, active interventions are needed to improve the nutritional status of this population.


Subject(s)
Frailty , Malnutrition , Humans , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Frailty/complications , Frailty/epidemiology , Long-Term Care , Geriatric Assessment , Malnutrition/complications , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Nutrition Assessment , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Frail Elderly
2.
J Transl Med ; 21(1): 284, 2023 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Micronutrients have been associated with disease severity and poorer clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19. However, there is a paucity of studies examining if the relationship with micronutrient status and clinical outcomes is independent of recognised prognostic factors, specifically frailty and the systemic inflammatory response (SIR). The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between micronutrient status, frailty, systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes in patients admitted with COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was performed on patients with confirmed COVID-19, admitted to hospital between the 1st April 2020-6th July 2020. Clinicopathological characteristics, frailty assessment, biochemical and micronutrient laboratory results were recorded. Frailty status was determined using the Clinical Frailty scale. SIR was determined using serum CRP. Clinical outcomes of interest were oxygen requirement, ITU admission and 30-day mortality. Categorical variables were analysed using chi-square test and binary logistics regression analysis. Continuous variables were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal Wallis tests. RESULTS: 281 patients were included. 55% (n = 155) were aged ≥ 70 years and 39% (n = 109) were male. 49% (n = 138) of patients were frail (CFS > 3). 86% (n = 242) of patients had a serum CRP > 10 mg/L. On univariate analysis, frailty was significantly associated with thirty-day mortality (p < 0.001). On univariate analysis, serum CRP was found to be significantly associated with an oxygen requirement on admission in non-frail patients (p = 0.004). Over a third (36%) of non-frail patients had a low vitamin B1, despite having normal reference range values of red cell B2, B6 and selenium. Furthermore, serum CRP was found to be significantly associated with a lower median red cell vitamin B1 (p = 0.029). CONCLUSION: Vitamin B1 stores may be depleted in COVID-19 patients experiencing a significant SIR and providing rationale for thiamine supplementation. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to delineate the trend in thiamine status following COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Humans , Male , Female , Frailty/complications , COVID-19/complications , Retrospective Studies , Micronutrients , Inflammation , Hospitals , Thiamine
3.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 35(4): 907-912, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273194

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a burden for the worldwide healthcare systems. Whereas a clear age-dependent mortality can be observed, especially multimorbid and frail persons are at an increased risk. As bio-functional rather than calendrical age is in the meanwhile known to play a crucial role for COVID-19-related outcomes, aging-associated risk factors, overall prognosis and physiological age-related changes should be systematically considered for clinical decision-making. In this overview, we focus on cellular senescence as a major factor of biological aging, associated with organ dysfunction and increased inflammation (inflammaging).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Frailty/complications , COVID-19/complications , Pandemics , Aging , Cellular Senescence
4.
Hypertens Res ; 46(5): 1188-1194, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284200

ABSTRACT

Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to stress resulting from physiological decline associated with aging. Topics of hypertension management and its association with frailty and cognitive function, recent studies of coronavirus disease 2019 infection (COVID-19) in elderly is discussed in this narrative review. While various guidelines for hypertension recommend that frailty is taken into account in treatment decisions, specific assessment tools and clinical decision criteria have not been explicitly established. Hypertension is prevalent in frail individuals, although a direct association has not been reported. Therefore, optimal blood pressure (BP) control is critical for managing cardiovascular risk reduction and preserving quality of life in frail hypertensive patients. BP typically decreases in later life or situations in which patients are dependent on nursing care. Mortality is reported to be high among frail patients with lower BP, raising questions about appropriate BP targets for frail patients. Cognitive decline is one of the domains of frailty, and is associated with a loss of autonomy, lack of self-management, and compromised quality of life. It remains to be clarified whether antihypertensive treatment is beneficial for cognitive function especially in older individuals. Increased severity and mortality of COVID-19 infection has been reported in older people. Clinical manifestations and biomarkers particular to older patients, and lifestyle changes including social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic is reported. From the knowledge from recent literatures, future perspectives for holistic approach and management of frail older people is addressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Hypertension , Humans , Aged , Frailty/complications , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Frail Elderly , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology
5.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 14(2): 333-343, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2236568

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Older patients with COVID-19 can present with atypical complaints, such as falls or delirium. In other diseases, such an atypical presentation is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, it is not known whether this extends to COVID-19. We aimed to study the association between atypical presentation of COVID-19, frailty and adverse outcomes, as well as the incidence of atypical presentation. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational multi-center cohort study in eight hospitals in the Netherlands. We included patients aged ≥ 70 years hospitalized with COVID-19 between February 2020 until May 2020. Atypical presentation of COVID-19 was defined as presentation without fever, cough and/or dyspnea. We collected data concerning symptoms on admission, demographics and frailty parameters [e.g., Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS)]. Outcome data included Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, discharge destination and 30-day mortality. RESULTS: We included 780 patients, 9.5% (n = 74) of those patients had an atypical presentation. Patients with an atypical presentation were older (80 years, IQR 76-86 years; versus 79 years, IQR 74-84, p = 0.044) and were more often classified as severely frail (CFS 6-9) compared to patients with a typical presentation (47.6% vs 28.7%, p = 0.004). Overall, there was no significant difference in 30-day mortality between the two groups in univariate analysis (32.4% vs 41.5%; p = 0.173) or in multivariate analysis [OR 0.59 (95% CI 0.34-1.0); p = 0.058]. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, patients with an atypical presentation of COVID-19 were more frail compared to patients with a typical presentation. Contrary to our expectations, an atypical presentation was not associated with worse outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Frailty/complications , Frailty/diagnosis , Frailty/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Frail Elderly , Retrospective Studies
6.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 35(2): 433-442, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2175322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delirium is an acute neuropsychiatric condition associated with unfavourable outcomes, frequent in older hospitalized people. In the context of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, few studies have specifically focused on the inflammatory status of older, frail patients with hyperactive delirium (HD) hospitalized for COVID-19. AIM: To identify biological correlates of HD at hospital admission and to assess the independent effect of delirium and physical frailty on in-hospital mortality. METHODS: Data were retrospectively extracted by the multicenter registry GeroCovid Observational Study. Individuals aged ≥ 60 years were included if the information on the presence of HD, frailty based on the modified Fried criteria and inflammatory status had been collected. The risk of mortality was evaluated using a Kaplan-Meier estimator, according to frailty and delirium. Logistic and restricted cubic-spline regressions were employed to assess the relationship between inflammatory markers and HD. RESULTS: Three-hundred-thirty-seven older adults were included in the analysis [mean age (SD) 77.1 (9.5) years, 50.1% females], and 11.5% presented with HD. A significant association of both PaO2/FiO2 ratio (p = 0.015) and serum lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.04) with delirium was observed. By Cox multivariable regression, frail and non-frail patients with HD had a 4.42 and 2.85 higher mortality risk compared with non-frail, non-delirious patients. CONCLUSIONS: Hyperactive delirium at hospital admission is related with markers of lung failure among older adults, especially when physical frailty coexists. Delirium is associated with increased in-hospital mortality risk, which is doubled by the coexistence of physical frailty.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Frailty , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Frailty/complications , COVID-19/complications , Frail Elderly/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Geriatric Assessment
7.
Top Antivir Med ; 30(3): 522-527, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2102586

ABSTRACT

Comorbid conditions have a major impact on the health, quality of life, and survival of people with HIV, particularly as this population ages. The 2022 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) featured excellent science related to specific comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and frailty. The role of systemic inflammation in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease was an important theme, with strong evidence regarding the impact of microbial translocation. Other studies examined functional impairment, frailty, and potential important contributors, such as concomitant medications and sleep disturbances. The ANCHOR (Anal Cancer/High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions Outcomes Research) study provided crucial evidence that treatment of high-risk anal lesions reduces the incidence of anal cancer, which has important implications in the prevention of this devastating comorbidity. In addition, numerous presentations demonstrated the importance of comorbid conditions in COVID-19 outcomes in people with HIV and described persistent symptoms after acute SARS-CoV-2 infection has resolved. This review focuses on the abstracts presented at CROI 2022 in these areas, highlighting those with the most clinical impact.


Subject(s)
Anus Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Frailty , HIV Infections , Humans , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Frailty/complications , Quality of Life , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Turk J Med Sci ; 52(5): 1495-1503, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091803

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with mortality in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, age-related risk factors for acute kidney injury are not clear yet. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the effects of clinical factors on acute kidney injury development in an elderly COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Critically ill patients (≥65years) with COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care unit were included in the study. Primary outcome of the study was the rate of acute kidney injury, and secondary outcome was to define the effect of frailty and other risk factors on acute kidney injury development and mortality. RESULTS: A total of 132 patients (median age 76 years, 68.2% male) were assessed. Patients were divided into two groups as follows: acute kidney injury (n = 84) and nonacute kidney injury (n = 48). Frailty incidence (48.8% vs. 8.3%, p < 0.01) was higher in the acute kidney injury group. In multivariate analysis, frailty (OR, 3.32, 95% CI, 1.67-6.56), the use of vasopressors (OR, 3.06 95% CI, 1.16-8.08), and the increase in respiratory support therapy (OR, 2.60, 95% CI, 1.01-6.6) were determined to be independent risk factors for acute kidney injury development. The mortality rate was found to be 97.6% in patients with acute kidney injury. DISCUSSION: Frailty is a risk factor for acute kidney injury in geriatric patients with severe COVID-19. The evaluation of geriatric patients based on a frailty scale before intensive care unit admission may improve outcomes.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Frailty , Humans , Male , Aged , Female , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Frailty/complications , Frailty/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Intensive Care Units
9.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 15605, 2022 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069890

ABSTRACT

Frailty is an important risk factor for adverse health-related outcomes. It is classified into several phenotypes according to nutritional state and physical activity. In this context, we investigated whether frailty phenotypes were related to clinical outcome of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). During the study period, a total of 526 patients were screened for HAP and 480 of whom were analyzed. The patients were divided into four groups according to physical inactivity and malnutrition: nutritional frailty (Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index [GNRI] < 82 and Clinical Frailty Scale [CFS] ≥ 4), malnutrition (GNRI < 82 and CFS < 4), physical frailty (GNRI ≥ 82 and CFS ≥ 4), and normal (GNRI ≥ 82 and CFS < 4). Among the phenotypes, physical frailty without malnutrition was the most common (39.4%), followed by nutritional frailty (30.2%), normal (20.6%), and malnutrition (9.8%). There was a significant difference in hospital survival and home discharge among the four phenotypes (p = 0.009), and the nutritional frailty group had the poorest in-hospital survival and home discharge (64.8% and 34.6%, respectively). In conclusion, there were differences in clinical outcomes according to the four phenotypes of HAP. Assessment of frailty phenotypes during hospitalization may improve outcomes through adequate nutrition and rehabilitation treatment of patients with HAP.


Subject(s)
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Frailty , Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia , Malnutrition , Aged , Exercise , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/complications , Frailty/complications , Geriatric Assessment , Hospitals , Humans , Malnutrition/etiology
11.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 301, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is unclear if the impact of frailty on mortality differs between patients with viral pneumonitis due to COVID-19 or other causes. We aimed to determine if a difference exists between patients with and without COVID-19 pneumonitis. METHODS: This multicentre, retrospective, cohort study using the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database included patients aged ≥ 16 years admitted to 153 ICUs between 01/012020 and 12/31/2021 with admission diagnostic codes for viral pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome, and Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). The primary outcome was hospital mortality. RESULTS: A total of 4620 patients were studied, and 3077 (66.6%) had COVID-19. The patients with COVID-19 were younger (median [IQR] 57.0 [44.7-68.3] vs. 66.1 [52.0-76.2]; p < 0.001) and less frail (median [IQR] CFS 3 [2-4] vs. 4 [3-5]; p < 0.001) than non-COVID-19 patients. The overall hospital mortality was similar between the patients with and without COVID-19 (14.7% vs. 14.9%; p = 0.82). Frailty alone as a predictor of mortality showed only moderate discrimination in differentiating survivors from those who died but was similar between patients with and without COVID-19 (AUROC 0.68 vs. 0.66; p = 0.42). Increasing frailty scores were associated with hospital mortality, after adjusting for Australian and New Zealand Risk of Death score and sex. However, the effect of frailty was similar in patients with and without COVID-19 (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.19-1.41 vs. OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.11-1.37). CONCLUSION: The presence of frailty was an independent risk factor for mortality. However, the impact of frailty on outcomes was similar in COVID-19 patients compared to other causes of viral pneumonitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Frailty , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Australia/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Data Analysis , Frailty/complications , Frailty/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Registries , Retrospective Studies
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032929

ABSTRACT

The general population, but especially older adults, were forced or encouraged to stay home during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, indoor mobility (IM, the number of steps performed daily at home) may be informative about the general health status of older adults. The present study aimed at evaluating the relationship between IM, frailty (loss of functional reserve including both physical and psychosocial domains), and disability (loss of autonomy measured as activities of daily life, ADLs) in a sample of community-dwelling Italian older adults. Specifically, the primary objective was to investigate IM and disability differences between robust and frail older adults. The secondary objective was to test if frailty is in the causal sequence between IM and disability, i.e., as a mediator in their relationship. Thirty-two participants (mean age = 70 ± 6 years; 56.2% women) were recruited. Frailty and disability were evaluated using the Tilburg Frailty Indicator and the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale, respectively. IM at home was measured via an Adamo wristwatch (a connected accelerometer). One-way analyses of covariance, controlling for age and gender, showed that robust participants, classified according to a score higher than five points in the Tilburg Frailty Indicator, performed significantly more IM (F1,28 = 4.639; p = 0.04) and presented lower disability grade than frail ones (F1,28 = 4.342; p =0.046). Only physical frailty was a mediator in the relationship between IM and disability (F2,29 = 8.538, p < 0.001), with a fully mediated model (z = -2.073, p < 0.04). Conversely, the total frailty score was not a mediator in the same relationship, but with IM accounted for the variance in disability (F2,29 = 8.538, p < 0.001; R2 = 33.7%). Our results suggested that frail older adults restricted their IM more and presented a higher level of disability compared to robust older adults. Moreover, data suggest that IM reduction may have a negative impact on physical frailty and indirectly increase disability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Frail Elderly/psychology , Frailty/complications , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Humans , Independent Living , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
13.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 542, 2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Aging is one of the most important prognostic factors increasing the risk of clinical severity and mortality of COVID-19 infection. However, among patients over 75 years, little is known about post-acute functional decline. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with functional decline 3 months after COVID-19 onset, to identify long term COVID-19 symptoms and transitions between frailty statesafter COVID-19 onset in older hospitalized patients. METHODS: This prospective observational study included COVID-19 patients consecutively hospitalized from March to December 2020 in Acute Geriatric Ward in Nantes University Hospital. Functional decline, frailty status and long term symptoms were assessed at 3 month follow up. Functional status was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living simplified scale (ADL). Frailty status was evaluated using Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). We performed multivariable analyses to identify factors associated with functional decline. RESULTS: Among the 318 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 infection, 198 were alive 3 months after discharge. At 3 months, functional decline occurred in 69 (36%) patients. In multivariable analysis, a significant association was found between functional decline and stroke (OR = 4,57, p = 0,003), history of depressive disorder (OR = 3,05, p = 0,016), complications (OR = 2,24, p = 0,039), length of stay (OR = 1,05, p = 0,025) and age (OR = 1,08, p = 0,028). At 3 months, 75 patients described long-term symptoms (49.0%). Of those with frailty (CFS scores ≥5) at 3-months follow-up, 30% were not frail at baseline. Increasing frailty defined by a worse CFS state between baseline and 3 months occurred in 41 patients (26.8%). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that both the severity of the COVID-19 infection and preexisting medical conditions correlates with a functional decline at distance of the infection. This encourages practitioners to establish discharge personalized care plan based on a multidimensional geriatric assessment and in parallel on clinical severity evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Frailty , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/complications , Follow-Up Studies , Frail Elderly , Frailty/complications , Frailty/diagnosis , Frailty/epidemiology , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Humans , Prospective Studies , Survivors
14.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 13(5): 1149-1157, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906626

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Frailty has emerged as an important construct to support clinical decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, doubts remain related to methodological limitations of published studies. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of all people aged 75 + admitted to hospital in England between 1 March 2020 and 31 July 2021. COVID-19 and frailty risk were captured using International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD-10) diagnostic codes. We used the generalised gamma model to estimate accelerated failure time, reporting unadjusted and adjusted results. RESULTS: The cohort comprised 103,561 individuals, mean age 84.1, around half female, 82% were White British with a median of two comorbidities. Frailty risk was distributed approximately 20% low risk and 40% each at intermediate or high risk. In the unadjusted survival plots, 28-day mortality was almost 50% for those with an ICD-10 code of U071 (COVID-19 virus identified), and 25-35% for those with U072 (COVID-19 virus not identified). In the adjusted analysis, the accelerated failure time estimates for those with intermediate and high frailty risk were 0.63 (95% CI 0.58-0.68) and 0.67 (95% CI 0.62-0.72) fewer days alive respectively compared to those with low frailty risk with an ICD-10 diagnosis of U072 (reference category). CONCLUSION: In older people with confirmed COVID-19, both intermediate and high frailty risk were associated with reduced survival compared to those with low frailty risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Frail Elderly , Frailty/complications , Frailty/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
15.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 13(4): 933-939, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878017

ABSTRACT

METHODS: A limited amount of data is now available on prognostic factors and mortality among elderly people resident in Long-Term Care facilities and in post-acute units. These populations (in particular those with underlying chronic medical conditions) seem to have higher risk of morbidity and mortality related to COVID-19 disease, but further evidence is needed. The aim of our study is to investigate the impact of some well-known prognostic factors in elderly patients (≥ 65 years) with COVID-19 admitted in the Long-Term Care setting in AUSL Ferrara, Italy. We performed binary regression logistic analysis for some variables (demographic data, clinical data including nasal swab test (NST) at discharge and frailty assessments) to find potential predictors of mortality. We subsequently tested statistically significant variables using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox-regression models to find survival outcomes and related hazard ratio. RESULTS: Risk factors associated with increased mortality resulted NST at discharge, infection, age and frailty. At a further secondary analysis carried out between NST at discharge, age and clinical frailty scale (CFS) < 5, we found a positive correlation between NST at discharge and CFS < 5. Kaplan-Meier curves showed a statistically significant difference regarding frailty and NST at discharge but not for age. CONCLUSION: Our study showed that absence of negativization of NST at discharge and frailty are strong predictors for mortality in elderly COVID-19 patients admitted in Long-Term Care facilities, while age and the comorbidity burden are less important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Frailty , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/complications , Frailty/complications , Frailty/diagnosis , Frailty/epidemiology , Humans , Long-Term Care , Risk Factors
16.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 34(5): 553-559, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788567

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The prevalence and effects of anxiety on health-related quality of life and clinical outcomes in cirrhosis are not well understood. This is increasingly relevant during COVID-19. Our aim was to use the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to determine the prevalence of anxiety, its association with clinical outcomes in cirrhosis and to develop a rapid cirrhosis-specific anxiety screening nomogram. METHODS: Adults with a diagnosis of cirrhosis were prospectively recruited as outpatients at three tertiary care hospitals across Alberta and followed for up to 6 months to determine the association with unplanned hospitalization/death. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) was used as a screening tool as it is free of influence from somatic symptoms. Anxiety was diagnosed using the MINI. RESULTS: Of 304 patients, 17% of patients had anxiety by the MINI and 32% by the HADS. Anxious patients had lower health-related quality of life as assessed by the chronic liver disease questionnaire (P < 0.001) and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale (P < 0.001), and also had higher levels of frailty using the Clinical Frailty score (P = 0.004). Multivariable analysis revealed smoking and three HADS subcomponents as independent predictors of anxiety. These were used to develop a rapid screening nomogram. CONCLUSION: A formal diagnosis of anxiety was made in approximately one in five patients with cirrhosis, and it was associated with worse HrQoL and frailty. The use of a 4-question nonsomatic symptom-based nomogram requires validation but is promising as a rapid screen for anxiety in cirrhosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Frailty/complications , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Nomograms , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e056190, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723811

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 infections have become an urgent worldwide public health concern. Although it is primarily a respiratory disease, up to two-thirds of hospitalised COVID-19 patients exhibit nervous system damage and an increased risk of frailty. In this study,we aim to investigate the relationship between frailty and cognitive function disorders in patients with COVID-19 with a systematic review and meta-analysis approach. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This meta-analysis has been registered by the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. We will search for relevant studies from PubMed, Embase, Chinese Biological Medical Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, from their inception to 5 July 2021. We will also search reference lists of selected articles for additional studies. Our search strategy will have no language restrictions. We will employ a fixed or random-effects model to calculate OR and 95% CIs for pooled data, and assess heterogeneity using Cochrane's Q and I2 tests. The primary outcome will be the rate of cognitive disorders related to frailty in old patients with COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not essential since data will be extracted from previously published studies. The results of this meta-analysis will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021257148.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , COVID-19/complications , China , Cognition , Frailty/complications , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
18.
Panminerva Med ; 64(1): 24-30, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513376

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older people hospitalized for COVID-19 are at highest risk of death. Frailty Assessment can detect heterogeneity in risk among people of the same chronological age. We investigated the association between frailty and in-hospital and medium-term mortality in middle-aged and older adults with COVID-19 during the first two pandemic waves. METHODS: This study is an observational multicenter study. We recorded sociodemographic factors (age, sex), smoking status, date of symptom onset, biological data, need for supplemental oxygen, comorbidities, cognitive and functional status, in-hospital mortality. We calculated a Frailty Index (FI) as the ratio between deficits presented and total deficits considered for each patient (theoretical range 0-1). We also assessed the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). Mortality at follow-up was ascertained from a regional registry. RESULTS: In total, 1344 patients were included; median age 68 years (Q1-Q3, 56-79); 857 (64%) were men. Median CFS score was 3 (Q1-Q3 2-5) and was lower in younger vs. older patients. Median FI was 0.06 (Q1-Q3 0.03-0.09) and increased with increasing age. Overall, 244 (18%) patients died in-hospital and 288 (22%) over a median follow-up of 253 days. FI and CFS were significantly associated with risk of death. In two different models using the same covariates, each increment of 0.1 in FI increased the overall hazard of death by 35% (HR=1.35, 95%CI 1.23-1.48), similar to the hazard for each increment of CFS (HR=1.37, 95%CI 1.25-1.50). CONCLUSIONS: Frailty, assessed with the FI or CFS, predicts in-hospital and medium-term mortality and may help estimate vulnerability in middle-aged and older COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Frail Elderly , Frailty/complications , Hospital Mortality , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Frailty/diagnosis , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
19.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(12): e58, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From February 20 to April 2020, the coronavirus SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV-2 spread in northern Italy, drastically challenging the care capacities of the national health care system. Unprepared for this emergency, hospitals have quickly reformulated paths of assistance in an effort to guarantee treatment for infected patients. Orthopaedic departments have been focused on elderly traumatology, especially the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the orthopaedic management strategy for femoral fragility fractures in COVID-19-positive patients with the hypothesis that operative treatment may contribute to the overall stability of the patient. METHODS: Sixteen patients affected by proximal femoral fracture and a recent history of fever, shortness of breath, and desaturation were admitted to the emergency room. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) and oropharyngeal swabs confirmed that they were positive for COVID-19, requiring hospitalization and prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin. RESULTS: Three patients died before surgery because of severe respiratory insufficiency and multiple-organ-failure syndrome. Ten patients underwent surgery on the day after admission, whereas 3 patients had suspended their use of direct thrombin inhibitors and needed surgery to be delayed until the third day after admission. In all patients except 1, we noted an improvement in terms of O2 saturation and assisted respiration. In 9 patients, hemodynamic and respiratory stability was observed at an average of 7 days postoperatively. Four patients who underwent surgical treatment died of respiratory failure on the first day after surgery (1 patient), the third day after surgery (2 patients), or the seventh day after surgery (1 patient). CONCLUSIONS: We noted a stabilization of respiratory parameters in 12 COVID-19-positive patients who underwent surgery treatment of proximal femoral fractures. We believe that in elderly patients with COVID-19 who have proximal femoral fractures, surgery may contribute to the overall stability of the patient, seated mobilization, improvement in physiological ventilation, and general patient comfort in bed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Femoral Fractures/surgery , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary/adverse effects , Frailty/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Femoral Fractures/mortality , Femoral Fractures/virology , Frailty/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 34(3): 535-543, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Osteosarcopenia is a newly described, aging-associated condition. Social frailty is an important condition whose prevalence may have risen by physical distancing during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. However, the relationship between these two remains unclear. AIMS: To examine the association between osteosarcopenia and social frailty. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted using data from outpatients visiting general geriatric hospital frailty clinics. Bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Osteoporosis was defined as a BMD of < 70% of the young adult mean, according to the Japan Osteoporosis Society. Sarcopenia was diagnosed as per the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia 2019 recommendation. Osteosarcopenia was defined as the co-existence of osteoporosis and sarcopenia. We defined social frailty using a questionnaire comprising four items: general resources, social resources, social behavior, and basic social needs. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was performed with social frailty status and osteosarcopenia as the dependent and independent variables, respectively. RESULTS: We included 495 patients (mean age = 76.5 ± 7.2 years) in the analysis; of these, 58.2% were robust and 17.2%, 13.5%, and 11.1% had osteoporosis alone, sarcopenia alone, and osteosarcopenia, respectively. Social frailty prevalence increased stepwise from 8.0% in robust patients to 11.8%, 17.9%, and 29.1% among those with osteoporosis alone, sarcopenia alone, and osteosarcopenia, respectively (P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that only osteosarcopenia was significantly associated with social frailty (pooled odds ratio: 2.117; 95% confidence interval: 1.104-4.213). DISCUSSION: Comprehensive assessment of osteosarcopenia and social frailty is needed for disability prevention in older adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Osteoporosis , Sarcopenia , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Frailty/complications , Frailty/diagnosis , Frailty/epidemiology , Humans , Osteoporosis/complications , Osteoporosis/diagnosis , Osteoporosis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/complications , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL