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1.
Comput Intell Neurosci ; 2022: 3183492, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993118

ABSTRACT

Recent articles reported a massive increase in frustration among weak students due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). These students need to be evaluated to detect possible psychological counseling and extra attention. On the one hand, the literature reports many optimization techniques focusing on existing students' performance prediction systems. On the other hand, psychological works provide insights into massive research findings focusing on various students' emotions, including frustration. However, the synchronization among these contributions is still a black box, which delays the mathematical modeling of students' frustration. Also, the literature is still limited in using insights of psychology and assumption-based datasets to provide an in-house iterative procedure for modeling students' frustration severity. This paper proposes an optimization technique called the iterative model of frustration severity (IMFS) to explore the black box. It analyzes students' performance via two modules. First, frustration is divided into four outer layers. Second, the students' performance outcome is split into 34 inner layers. The prediction results are iteratively optimized under the umbrella of frustration severity layers through the outer and inner iterations. During validation, the IMFS achieves promising results with various evaluation measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frustration , Emotions , Humans , Students/psychology
2.
Healthc Policy ; 17(4): 6-14, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893379

ABSTRACT

The spring has ushered in an unexpected number of major health policy announcements compared with the last 10 years. They are led by the federal government's outlines of a national pharmacare program, an unexpected dental care program (Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau 2022), plus "top-up" funding for clearing provincial surgical and imaging backlogs. These announcements are on top of the voices expressing concerns about COVID-19-related healthcare expenditure trends (Bailey 2022). Without a doubt, taxpayer money is flowing freely into healthcare (Labby 2020).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frustration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Health Expenditures , Health Policy , Humans
3.
Nature ; 606(7912): 20-21, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878509
4.
Scand J Psychol ; 63(5): 513-521, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819930

ABSTRACT

This study aimed at identifying significant associations between stress, personality traits, and basic psychological needs' satisfaction and frustration. In the study, a simple random sample consisted of 245 employees (mean age = 39.6; SD = 10.82). 138 (57.5%) employees worked in the public sector, and 102 (42.5%) employees worked in the private sector. This study found no statistically significant differences between the private and public sector employees in the stress overload. Private sector employees demonstrated higher autonomy and relatedness satisfaction, while public sector employees demonstrated higher autonomy frustration. Public sector employees demonstrated higher scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness, but no significant differences between public and private sectors were found comparing the scores on extraversion, neuroticism, and open-mindedness. The SEM identified some significant associations between neuroticism, unsatisfied needs, and stress overload; conscientiousness, unsatisfied needs, and stress overload; basic psychological needs' satisfaction and four personality traits, namely, extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and open-mindedness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personality , Adult , Extraversion, Psychological , Frustration , Humans , Neuroticism , Pandemics
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785709

ABSTRACT

Police officers, firefighters, and paramedics are on the front lines of crises and emergencies, placing them at high risk of COVID-19 infection. A deeper understanding of the challenges facing first responders during the COVID-19 pandemic is necessary to better support this important workforce. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 21 first responders during the COVID-19 pandemic, asking about the impact of COVID-19. Data collected from our study interviews revealed that, despite large numbers of COVID-19 infections among the staff of police and fire departments, some-but not all-first responders were concerned about COVID-19. A similar divide existed within this group regarding whether or not to receive a COVID-19 vaccination. Many first responders reported frustration over COVID-19 information because of inconsistencies across sources, misinformation on social media, and the impact of politics. In addition, first responders described increased stress due to the COVID-19 pandemic caused by factors such as the fear of COVID exposure during emergency responses, concerns about infecting family members, and frustration surrounding new work policies. Our findings provide insight into the impact of COVID-19 on first responders and highlight the importance of providing resources for education about COVID-19 risks and vaccination, as well as for addressing first responders' mental health and well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Responders , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Fear , Frustration , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Feb 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674616

ABSTRACT

Despite the proximity of both countries, Danes and Germans differ in the level of trust in their government. This may play a role with respect to the disruptive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on university students. This study investigated the association between trust in governmental regulations, trust in university regulations, risk perceptions, and academic frustration among Danish and German students. As part of the COVID-19 International Student Well-being Study, an online survey was distributed among university students in participating European and non-European universities. In Denmark, 2945 students and Germany, 8725 students responded to the questionnaire between May and July 2020. Students from both countries reported approximately the same level of academic frustration concerning their progress and quality of education. However, German students perceived a higher risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2 compared to Danish respondents. Danish students showed higher trust in their government's COVID-19 regulations than German students. Lower trust in government and university COVID-19 regulations and higher risk perception were associated with higher academic frustration. These results indicate that the level of trust in COVID-19 regulations might have an impact the overall frustration of students regarding their study conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frustration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Trust , Universities
8.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 918-925, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376163

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and postponement of elective surgical procedures for profoundly deaf patients awaiting cochlear implantation. METHOD: Open-ended questionnaires were sent to all adult patients awaiting cochlear implantation surgery. Qualitative analysis was performed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Participants described a primarily negative impact on wellbeing from the surgery delay, expressing feelings of isolation or loneliness. Low mood, depression or hopelessness were commonly expressed by elderly participants; frustration and anxiety were described by young adults. Participants described a negative impact on their general daily life, describing difficulties communicating with facemasks and struggles with reliance on telephone communication because of social distancing. Despite these significant psychosocial challenges, only a minority described adaptive coping strategies. DISCUSSION: Profoundly deaf patients may be at greater psychosocial risk because of unique challenges from their hearing disability. Our findings can be used to develop evidence-driven strategies to improve communication, wellbeing and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cochlear Implantation/methods , Cochlear Implants/statistics & numerical data , Deafness/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cochlear Implants/supply & distribution , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Frustration , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
Glob Public Health ; 16(6): 947-963, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145128

ABSTRACT

Consequences of COVID-19 pandemic responses have included exacerbated poverty, food insecurity and state and domestic violence. Such effects may be particularly pronounced amongst adolescents and young people living in contexts of precarity and constraint, including in South Africa. However, there are evidence gaps on the lived experiences of this group. We conducted telephonic semi-structured interviews with adolescents and young people in two South African provinces (n = 12, ages 18-25) in April 2020 to explore and document their experiences, challenges and coping strategies during strict COVID-19 lockdown. Participants described indirect effects of COVID-19 including food insecurity, lost livelihoods and changes to social service provisions such as municipal electricity services and sanitation. Psychosocial stressors related to uncertainty over education and work futures were also discussed. The aforementioned challenges were particularly present with young parents, 'working poor' participants, and those with pre-existing mental health challenges. Participants demonstrated excellent COVID-19 transmission and prevention knowledge, showing that they had received and correctly interpreted public health messaging. Despite this, many simultaneously held non-scientific COVID-19 beliefs. Engaging a socio ecological framework, findings demonstrate how the indirect effects of COVID-19 may exacerbate underlying multi-layered vulnerabilities for adolescents and young people living in contexts of precarity and constraint.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Life Change Events , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , Depression , Female , Frustration , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa , Young Adult
10.
Science ; 371(6525): 133-134, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041800
11.
Math Biosci Eng ; 17(6): 7892-7915, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1034695

ABSTRACT

We introduce a novel modeling framework for incorporating fear of infection and frustration with social distancing into disease dynamics. We show that the resulting SEIR behavior-perception model has three principal modes of qualitative behavior-no outbreak, controlled outbreak, and uncontrolled outbreak. We also demonstrate that the model can produce transient and sustained waves of infection consistent with secondary outbreaks. We fit the model to cumulative COVID-19 case and mortality data from several regions. Our analysis suggests that regions which experience a significant decline after the first wave of infection, such as Canada and Israel, are more likely to contain secondary waves of infection, whereas regions which only achieve moderate success in mitigating the disease's spread initially, such as the United States, are likely to experience substantial secondary waves or uncontrolled outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Simulation , Disease Outbreaks , Frustration , Health Behavior , Humans , Quarantine
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