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1.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286707, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244195

ABSTRACT

One of the problems facing an ageing population is functional decline associated with reduced levels of physical activity (PA). Traditionally researcher or clinician input is necessary to capture parameters of gait or PA. Enabling older adults to monitor their activity independently could raise their awareness of their activitiy levels, promote self-care and potentially mitigate the risks associated with ageing. The ankle is accepted as the optimum position for sensor placement to capture parameters of gait however, the waist is proposed as a more accessible body-location for older adults. This study aimed to compare step-count measurements obtained from a single inertial sensor positioned at the ankle and at the waist to that of a criterion measure of step-count, and to compare gait parameters obtained from the sensors positioned at the two different body-locations. Step-count from the waist-mounted inertial sensor was compared with that from the ankle-mounted sensor, and with a criterion measure of direct observation in healthy young and healthy older adults during a three-minute treadmill walk test. Parameters of gait obtained from the sensors at both body-locations were also compared. Results indicated there was a strong positive correlation between step-count measured by both the ankle and waist sensors and the criterion measure, and between ankle and waist sensor step-count, mean step time and mean stride time (r = .802-1.0). There was a moderate correlation between the step time variability measures at the waist and ankle (r = .405). This study demonstrates that a single sensor positioned at the waist is an appropriate method for the capture of important measures of gait and physical activity among older adults.


Subject(s)
Gait , Walking , Ankle , Ankle Joint
2.
Sensors (Basel) ; 23(8)2023 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321695

ABSTRACT

This paper reports the architecture of a low-cost smart crutches system for mobile health applications. The prototype is based on a set of sensorized crutches connected to a custom Android application. Crutches were instrumented with a 6-axis inertial measurement unit, a uniaxial load cell, WiFi connectivity, and a microcontroller for data collection and processing. Crutch orientation and applied force were calibrated with a motion capture system and a force platform. Data are processed and visualized in real-time on the Android smartphone and are stored on the local memory for further offline analysis. The prototype's architecture is reported along with the post-calibration accuracy for estimating crutch orientation (5° RMSE in dynamic conditions) and applied force (10 N RMSE). The system is a mobile-health platform enabling the design and development of real-time biofeedback applications and continuity of care scenarios, such as telemonitoring and telerehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Humans , Biomechanical Phenomena , Smartphone , Continuity of Patient Care , Gait
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313194

ABSTRACT

Cognitive impairment in older adults is associated with poor gait performance, physical decline, falls and poor quality of life. This paper analyzes the feasibility and efficacy of tango-based intervention in older people living in nursing homes with and without cognitive impairment. A multicenter study, with pre- and post-test, was carried out. Intervention attendance, well-being, physical abilities (short physical performance battery), walking performance, functional capacities (Katz Index) and quality of life (quality of life in Alzheimer's disease) were assessed. Fifty-four participants (84.9 ± 6.7 years, mini mental state examination 14.5 ± 7.4) completed the protocol. Intervention attendance was 92%, and the mean subjective well-being after each session was 4.5 ± 0.5 (on a five-point scale). A statistically significant improvement was found in the quality of life (p = 0.030). Non-statistically significant changes were found in walking performance (p = 0.159), physical abilities (p = 0.876) and in functional capacities (p = 0.253). This study shows feasibility and suggests evidence for the effects of tango therapy on well-being and quality of life. Further studies are necessary to contrast these findings and to support the role of tango interventions as a holistic approach to prevent functional decline in older people with cognitive impairment.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Gait , Nursing Homes , Walking
4.
Acta Biomed ; 94(2): e2023072, 2023 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299753
5.
Med Sci Sports Exerc ; 55(8): 1366-1374, 2023 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253040

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study assessed the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions/lockdowns on physical activity levels, body mass, quadriceps strength, and gait biomechanics over 18 months. METHODS: Ten healthy men were assessed at baseline (~14 wk before first lockdown) and 17.9 ± 0.3 months later (<1 wk after second lockdown). At both times, physical activity levels, body mass, and quadriceps strength were acquired using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, a force plate, and a dynamometer, respectively. Gait data were also acquired using a motion capture system and force plates during self-paced walking, from which spatiotemporal parameters, knee angles, and external moments were computed. Baseline and follow-up measurements were compared using two-tailed paired t -tests ( α = 0.05). RESULTS: At follow-up, participants spent less time doing vigorous physical activity (∆ = -76 ± 157 min·wk -1 , P = 0.048), exhibited a tendency toward increased sedentary time (∆ = +120 ± 162 min·d -1 , P = 0.056), weighed more (∆ = +2.5 ± 2.8 kg, P = 0.021), and showed a trend toward reduced quadriceps strength (∆ = -0.29 ± 0.45 (N·m)·kg -1 , P = 0.071) compared with baseline. At follow-up, participants walked slower (∆ = -0.09 ± 0.07 m·s -1 , P = 0.005), had greater knee flexion angles at heel strike (∆ = +2.2° ± 1.8°, P = 0.004) and during late stance (∆ = +2.2° ± 1.8°, P = 0.004), had reduced knee extension moments (∆ = -0.09 ± 0.09 (N·m)·kg -1 , P = 0.012) and knee internal rotation moments (∆ = -0.02 ± 0.02 (N·m)·kg -1 , P = 0.012) during late stance. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy men exhibited reduced physical activity levels, increased body weight, a tendency toward reduced quadriceps strength, and altered gait biomechanics over the initial 18 months of the COVID-19 pandemic-alterations that could have far-reaching health consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Male , Humans , Biomechanical Phenomena , Muscle Strength , Communicable Disease Control , Gait , Knee Joint , Walking , Quadriceps Muscle , Body Weight
6.
BMJ Open ; 13(3): e064054, 2023 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288225

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Approximately 33% of people who contracted COVID-19 still experience symptoms 12 weeks after infection onset. This persistence of symptoms is now considered a syndrome itself called 'long COVID'. Evidence regarding long COVID and its cognitive and physical impacts is growing, but the literature is currently lacking objectively measured data to guide towards adapted healthcare trajectories. The objectives are to describe the physical and cognitive impairments experienced by individuals living with long COVID using self-reported and clinical objective measures, and to compare the evolution over time of the physical and cognitive state between adults living with long COVID (at least one physical or cognitive COVID-19 symptom for more than 12 weeks following infection; long COVID group), people who developed COVID-19 but did not experience persistent symptoms (short COVID group) and people who did not develop COVID-19 (control group). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In this longitudinal cohort study, 120 participants will be recruited in each group. Variables will be collected through three evaluation sessions over 6 months (baseline, 3 months, 6 months). Variables include self-administered questionnaires on health-related quality of life, comorbidity, sleep, pain, anxiety, depressive symptoms, fatigue and cognitive function, as well as objective measures of cognitive (attention, memory, executive functioning) and physical (grip strength, balance, gait speed, gait endurance, VO2, frailty) functions. Activity, heart rate and sleep will be monitored with a fitness tracker watch for 7 days following evaluation sessions. Maximum-likelihood analyses of variance (ANOVAs) will be used to compare data at baseline between groups. Repeated measures ANOVAs will be used to compare the longitudinal performance variations across groups of the self-reported and clinical variables. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics committees of the CIUSSS de la Capitale-Nationale and CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal approved the project. Results will be disseminated through clinical and community platforms as well as through peer-reviewed manuscripts and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT05216536.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Adult , Humans , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gait , Longitudinal Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Quality of Life
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 14530, 2022 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008310

ABSTRACT

The use of people recognition techniques has become critical in some areas. For instance, social or assistive robots carry out collaborative tasks in the robotics field. A robot must know who to work with to deal with such tasks. Using biometric patterns may replace identification cards or codes on access control to critical infrastructures. The usage of Red Green Blue Depth (RGBD) cameras is ubiquitous to solve people recognition. However, this sensor has some constraints, such as they demand high computational capabilities, require the users to face the sensor, or do not regard users' privacy. Furthermore, in the COVID-19 pandemic, masks hide a significant portion of the face. In this work, we present BRITTANY, a biometric recognition tool through gait analysis using Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data and a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). A Proof of Concept (PoC) has been carried out in an indoor environment with five users to evaluate BRITTANY. A new CNN architecture is presented, allowing the classification of aggregated occupancy maps that represent the people's gait. This new architecture has been compared with LeNet-5 and AlexNet through the same datasets. The final system reports an accuracy of 88%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gait Analysis , Biometry/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gait , Humans , Neural Networks, Computer , Pandemics
8.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273308, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002324

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The use of portable gait measurement systems in research is appealing to collect real-world data at low-cost, low participant burden, and without requirement for dedicated lab space. Most commercially available inertial measurement units (IMU's) designed for running only capture temporospatial data, the ability to capture biomechanics data such as shock and motion metrics with the RunScribe IMU makes it the closest to a lab alternative. The RunScribe system has been validated in running, however, is yet to be validated for walking. METHOD: Qualisys motion capture, AMTI force plates, and Delsys Trigno accelerometers were used as gold standard lab measures for comparison against the RunScribe IMU. Twenty participants completed 10 footsteps per foot (20 total) measured by both systems simultaneously. Variables for validation included: Vertical Ground reaction force (GRF), instantaneous GRF rate, pronation excursion, pronation velocity, total shock, impact force, braking force. Interclass correlation (ICC) was used to determine agreement between the measurement systems, mean differences were used to evaluate group level accuracy. RESULTS: ICC results showed moderate agreement between measurement systems when both limbs were averaged. The greatest agreement was seen for GRF rate, pronation excursion, and pronation velocity (ICC = 0.627, 0.616, 0.539), low agreement was seen for GRF, total shock, impact shock, braking shock (ICC = 0.269, 0.351, 0.244, 0.180). However mean differences show the greatest level of accuracy for GRF, GRF rate, and impact shock. DISCUSSION: Results show mixed agreement between the RunScribe and gold standard lab measures, and varied agreement across left and right limbs. Kinematic variables showed the greatest agreement, however GRF had the lowest relative mean difference for group results. The results show acceptable levels of agreement for most variables, however further work must be done to assess the repeatability and sensitivity of the RunScribe to be applied within areas such as footwear testing and gait retraining protocols.


Subject(s)
Gait , Running , Biomechanical Phenomena , Foot , Humans , Walking
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841400

ABSTRACT

Stroke is one of the main causes of disability. Telerehabilitation could face the growing demand and a good strategy for post-stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study is to examine the possible effects of therapeutic exercises performed by an App on trunk control, balance, and gait in stroke survivors. A preliminary 12-week randomized controlled trial was developed. Thirty chronic stroke survivors were randomly allocated into two groups. Both groups performed conventional physiotherapy, in addition to, the experimental group (EG) had access to a telerehabilitation App to guide home-based core-stability exercises (CSE). Trunk performance was measured with the Spanish-Trunk Impairment Scale (S-TIS 2.0) and Spanish-Function in Sitting Test. Balance and gait were measured with Spanish-Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke patient, Berg Balance Scale and an accelerometer system. In EG was observed an improvement of 2.76 points in S-TIS 2.0 (p = 0.001). Small differences were observed in balance and gait. Adherence to the use of the App was low. CSE guided by a telerehabilitation App, combined with conventional physiotherapy, seem to improve trunk function and sitting balance in chronic post-stroke. Active participation in the rehabilitation process should be increased among stroke survivors. Further confirmatory studies are necessary with a large sample size.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Telerehabilitation , Exercise Therapy , Gait , Humans , Postural Balance , Survivors , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Biomech ; 137: 111098, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796563

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a multisystem infectious disease affecting the body systems. Its neurologic complications include -but are not limited to headache, loss of smell, encephalitis, and cerebrovascular accidents. Even though gait analysis is an objective measure of the neuro-motor system and may provide significant information about the pathophysiology of specific diseases, no studies have investigated the gait characteristics in adults after full recovery from COVID-19. This was a cross-sectional, controlled study that included 12 individuals (mean age, 23.0 ± 4.1 years) with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 history (COVD) and 20 sedentary controls (CONT; mean age, 24.0 ± 3.6 years). Gait was evaluated using inertial sensors on a motorized treadmill. Spatial-temporal gait parameters and gait symmetry were calculated by using at least 512 consecutive steps for each participant. The effect-size analyses were utilized to interpret the impact of the results. Spatial-temporal gait characteristics were comparable between the two groups. The COVD group showed more asymmetrical gait patterns than the CONT group in the double support duration symmetry (p = 0.042), single support duration symmetry (p = 0.006), loading response duration symmetry (p = 0.042), and pre-swing duration symmetry (p = 0.018). The effect size analyses of the differences showed large effects (d = 0.68-0.831). Individuals with a history of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 showed more asymmetrical gait patterns than individuals without a disease history. Regardless of its severity, the multifaceted long-term effects of COVID-19 need to be examined and the scope of clinical follow-up should be detailed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Stroke Rehabilitation , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Gait/physiology , Humans , Young Adult
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e059988, 2022 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774970

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Physical exercise and cognitive training have the potential to enhance cognitive function and mobility in older adults at risk of Alzheimer's disease and related dementia (ADRD), but little is known about the feasibility of delivering multidomain interventions in home settings of older adults at risk of ADRD. This study aims to assess the feasibility of home-based delivery of exercise and cognitive interventions, and to evaluate the relationship between participants' intervention preferences and their subsequent adherence. Secondary objectives include the effect of the interventions on ADRD risk factors, including frailty, mobility, sleep, diet and psychological health. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The SYNchronising Exercises, Remedies in GaIt and Cognition at Home (SYNERGIC@Home) feasibility trial is a randomised control trial that follows a 2×2 factorial design, with a 16-week home-based intervention programme (3 sessions per week) of physical exercises and cognitive training. Participants will be randomised in blocks of four to one of the following four arms: (1) combined exercise (aerobic and resistance)+cognitive training (NEUROPEAK); (2) combined exercise+control cognitive training (web searching); (3) control exercise (balance and toning)+cognitive training; and (4) control exercise+control cognitive training. SYNERGIC@Home will be implemented through video conferencing. Baseline and post-intervention assessments at 4-month and 10-month follow-up will include measures of cognition, frailty, mobility, sleep, diet and psychological health. Primary feasibility outcome is adherence to the interventions. Primary analytic outcome is the relationship between pre-allocation preference for a given intervention and subsequent adherence to the allocated intervention. A series of secondary analytic outcomes examining the potential effect of the individual and combined interventions on cognitive, mobility and general well-being will be measured at baseline and follow-up. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was granted by the relevant research ethics boards. Findings of the study will be presented to stakeholders and published in peer-reviewed journals and at provincial, national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04997681, Pre-results.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Cognition , Aged , Double-Blind Method , Exercise , Feasibility Studies , Gait , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e055880, 2022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765125

ABSTRACT

IntroductionSilent cerebrovascular disease (SCD), which is a common disease in the elderly, leads to cognitive decline, gait disorders, depression and urination dysfunction, and increases the risk of cerebrovascular events. Our study aims to compare the accuracy of the diagnosis of SCD-related gait disorders between the intelligent system and the clinician. Our team have developed an intelligent evaluation system for gait. This study will evaluate whether the intelligent system can help doctors make clinical decisions and predictions, which aids the early prevention and treatment of SCD. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study is a multi-centred, prospective, randomised and controlled trial.SCD subjects aged 60-85 years in Shanghai and Guizhou will be recruited continuously. All subjects will randomly be divided into a doctor with intelligence assistance group or a doctor group, at a 1:1 ratio. The doctor and intelligent assistant group will accept the intelligent system evaluation. The intelligent system obtains gait parameters by an Red-Green-Blue-depth camera and computer vision algorithm. The doctor group will accept the clinicians' routine treatment procedures. Meanwhile, all subjects will accept the panel's gait assessment and recognition rating scale as the gold standard. The primary outcome is the sensitivity of the intelligent system and clinicians to screen for gait disorders. The secondary outcomes include the healthcare costs and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio of intelligent systems and clinicians to screen for gait disorders. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Approval was granted by the Ethics Committee of Zhongshan Hospital affiliated with Fudan University on 26 November 2019. The approval number is B2019-027(2) R. All subjects will sign an informed consent form before enrolment. Serious adverse events will be reported to the main researchers and ethics committees. The subjects' data will be kept strictly confidential. The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04457908.


Subject(s)
Cerebrovascular Disorders , Gait , Aged , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnosis , China , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
13.
J Clin Rheumatol ; 28(5): 235-239, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758967

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: With the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic, telemedicine applications gained momentum, and clinicians tried to develop various musculoskeletal examination methods to be used in telemedicine visits. The aim of this study is to investigate the interrater reliability, acceptability, and practicality of the real-time video Pediatric Gait, Arms, Legs, and Spine (v-pGALS) assessment used in the evaluation during the telemedicine visit. METHODS: The study was designed as cross-sectional. Twenty school-aged children who presented to outpatient clinics with musculoskeletal complaints were included. For interrater reliability, the children were evaluated by face-to-face examination with v-pGALS, and then the child was reevaluated by another physiatrist with real-time evaluation (online video call) with the help of a parent. For acceptability, the time taken and the discomfort caused were evaluated by patients/parents with the smiley face visual analog scale, whereas to assess practicality, the ratio of completeness to duration of examination completion was recorded. RESULTS: κ coefficient of the agreement was found to be 0.88 between the results of the face-to-face examination and online video examination, suggesting very good agreement between the 2 raters. Acceptability of v-pGALS by parents and patients was high; 60% of children and 80% of parents found the duration of examination acceptable, and 70% of the patients and 95% of parents reported no discomfort caused by examination. The duration of face-to-face examination was 5.75 ± 1.29 minutes, whereas the duration of online examination was 15.81 ± 4.9 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Video pGALS is a reliable, acceptable, and practical examination system that can be used for musculoskeletal assessment of children in telemedicine visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Gait , Humans , Leg , Reproducibility of Results
14.
Exp Gerontol ; 162: 111747, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of telehealth has increased since the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the lack of reliable and valid tools to measure balance and gait remotely makes assessing these outcomes difficult. Thus, we investigated whether balance and gait measures used in clinical practice are reliable and valid when assessed remotely through telehealth. METHOD: In this pilot study, we investigated 15 healthy older adults who performed validated tests: Timed Up and Go simple, dual cognitive and motor tasks; Berg Balance Scale; Functional Gait Assessment and Dynamic Gait Index. The tests were assessed on two dates: (i) face-to-face, (ii) and remotely, via videoconference between 7 and 14 days after the initial assessment. Participants also undertook the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) to assess their risk of falling. Reliability was measured using intraclass correlation (ICC) two-way mixed with absolute agreement to contrast the score of the assessments undertaken face-to-face and remotely in real-time and recorded. We also assessed inter-rater reliability. Criterion validity was measured using Pearson correlation between the tests that were undertaken remotely and PPA. RESULTS: All tests showed good reliability between face-to-face and real-time telehealth (ICC = 0.79-0.87) and face-to-face and recorded telehealth (ICC = 0.78-0.88) assessments and good to excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.80-1.00). Correlation between the tests and PPA were significantly (p < 0.05) moderate for real-time (r = -0.68-0.64) and recorded (r = -0.69-0.71) telehealth assessments. CONCLUSIONS: The good reliability between face-to-face and remote measurements together with moderate validity of these measures to assess fall risk suggest that health professionals could use these measures to evaluate the balance and gait of healthy older adults remotely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Gait/physiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Postural Balance/physiology , Reproducibility of Results
15.
J Intensive Care Med ; 37(7): 890-898, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650147

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to examine Dual Task (DT) performance in patients surviving severe and critical COVID-19 compared to patients with chronic lung disease (CLD). Secondarily, we aimed to determine the psychometric properties of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test in patients surviving COVID-19. DESIGN: Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. SETTING: Academic medical center within United States. PATIENTS: Ninety-two patients including 36 survivors of critical COVID-19 that required mechanical ventilation (critical-COVID), 20 patients recovering from COVID-19 that required supplemental oxygen with hospitalization (severe-COVID), and 36 patients with CLD serving as a control group. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients completed the TUG, DT-TUG, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT) 1-month after hospital discharge. A subset of patients returned at 3-months and repeated testing to determine the minimal detectable change (MDC). Critical-COVID group (16.8 ± 7.3) performed the DT-TUG in significantly slower than CLD group (13.9 ± 4.8 s; P = .024) and Severe-COVID group (13.1 ± 5.1 s; P = .025). Within-subject difference between TUG and DT-TUG was also significantly worse in critical-COVID group (-21%) compared to CLD (-10%; P = .012), even despite CLD patients having a higher comorbid burden (P < .003) and older age (P < .001). TUG and DT-TUG demonstrated strong to excellent construct validity to the chair rise test, gait speed, and 6MWT for both COVID-19 groups (r = -0.84to 0.73, P < .05). One- and 3-months after hospital discharge there was a floor effect of 14% (n = 5/36) and 5.2% (n = 1/19), respectively for patients in the critical-COVID group. Ceiling effects were noted in four (11%) critical-COVID, six (30%) severe-COVID patients for the TUG and DT-TUG at 1-month. CONCLUSION: The ability to maintain mobility performance in the presence of a cognitive DT is grossly impaired in patients surviving critical COVID-19. DT performance may subserve the understanding of impairments related to Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) for survivors of critical illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Task Performance and Analysis , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Gait , Humans , Prospective Studies
16.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260889, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately 40-70% of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) fall each year, causing decreased activity levels and quality of life. Current fall-prevention strategies include the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. To increase the accessibility of this vulnerable population, we developed a multidisciplinary telemedicine program using an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platform. We hypothesized that the risk for falling in PD would decrease among participants receiving a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program added to standard office-based neurological care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention to decrease the incidence of falls in patients with PD. METHODS: Ongoing, longitudinal, randomized, single-blinded, case-control, clinical trial. We will include 76 non-demented patients with idiopathic PD with a high risk of falling and limited access to multidisciplinary care. The intervention group (n = 38) will receive multidisciplinary remote care in addition to standard medical care, and the control group (n = 38) standard medical care only. Nutrition, sarcopenia and frailty status, motor, non-motor symptoms, health-related quality of life, caregiver burden, falls, balance and gait disturbances, direct and non-medical costs will be assessed using validated rating scales. RESULTS: This study will provide a cost-effectiveness assessment of multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention for fall reduction in PD, in addition to standard neurological medical care. CONCLUSION: In this challenging initiative, we will determine whether a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program can reduce falls, as an alternative intervention option for PD patients with restricted access to multidisciplinary care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04694443.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Exercise Therapy/methods , Gait , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
17.
Pract Neurol ; 21(6): 554, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526525

Subject(s)
Cerebellar Ataxia , Masks , Gait , Humans
18.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 326, 2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a highly prevalent neurodegenerative disease whose incidence is increasing with an aging population. One of the most serious manifestations of PD is gait instability, leading to falls and subsequent complications that can be debilitating, even fatal. Boxing therapy (BT) uses gait and balance exercises to improve ambulation in people with PD, though its efficacy has not yet been fully proven. METHODS: In the current longitudinal observational study, 98 participants with idiopathic PD underwent twice-weekly BT sessions. Primary outcome was self-reported falls per month; secondary outcomes were quantitative and semi-quantitative gait and balance performance evaluations. Statistical methods included segmented generalized estimating equation with an independent correlation structure, binomial distribution, and log link. RESULTS: The average number of self-reported falls per month per participant decreased by 87%, from 0.86 ± 3.58 prior to BT, to 0.11 ± 0.26 during BT. During the lockdown imposed by COVID-19, this increased to 0.26 ± 0.48 falls per month. Females and those > 65 years old reported the greatest increase in falls during the lockdown period. Post-lockdown resumption of BT resulted in another decline in falls, to 0.14 ± 0.33. Quantitative performance metrics, including standing from a seated position and standing on one leg, largely mirrored the pattern of falls pre-and post-lockdown. CONCLUSIONS: BT may be an effective option for many PD patients.


Subject(s)
Boxing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise Therapy , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Gait , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Postural Balance
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(12)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282475

ABSTRACT

Gait impairment often limits physical activity and negatively impacts quality of life. EMG-Biofeedback (EMG-BFB), one of the more effective interventions for improving gait impairment, has been limited to laboratory use due to system costs and technical requirements, and has therefore not been tested on a larger scale. In our research, we aimed to develop and validate a cost-effective, commercially available EMG-BFB device for home- and community-based use. We began by repurposing mTrigger® (mTrigger LLC, Newark, DE, USA), a cost-effective, portable EMG-BFB device, for gait application. This included developing features in the cellphone app such as step feedback, success rate, muscle activity calibration, and cloud integration. Next, we tested the validity and reliability of the mTrigger device in healthy adults by comparing it to a laboratory-grade EMG system. While wearing both devices, 32 adults walked overground and on a treadmill at four speeds (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 m/s). Statistical analysis revealed good to excellent test-retest reliability (r > 0.89) and good to excellent agreement in the detection of steps (ICC > 0.85) at all speeds between two systems for treadmill walking. Our results indicated that mTrigger compared favorably to a laboratory-grade EMG system in the ability to assess muscular activity and to provide biofeedback during walking in healthy adults.


Subject(s)
Gait , Quality of Life , Adult , Biofeedback, Psychology , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Walking
20.
Neurol Sci ; 42(8): 3089-3092, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245657

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Falls could be serious events in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patient remote monitoring strategies are on the raise and may be an additional aid in identifying patients who are at risk of falling. The aim of the study was to evaluate if balance and timed-up-and-go data obtained by a smartphone application during COVID-19 lockdown were able to predict falls in PD patients. METHODS: A cohort of PD patients were monitored for 4 weeks during the COVID-19 lockdown with an application measuring static balance and timed-up-and-go test. The main outcome was the occurrence of falls (UPDRS-II item 13) during the observation period. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients completed the study, and 4 (12%) reported falls in the observation period. The rate of falls was reduced with respect to patient previous falls history (24%). The stand-up time and the mediolateral sway, acquired through the application, differed between "fallers" and "non-fallers" and related to the occurrence of new falls (OR 1.7 and 1.6 respectively, p < 0.05), together with previous falling (OR 7.5, p < 0.01). In a multivariate model, the stand-up time and the history of falling independently related to the outcome (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides new data on falls in Parkinson's disease during the lockdown. The reduction of falling events and the relationship with the stand-up time might suggest that a different quality of falls occurs when patient is forced to stay home - hence, clinicians should point their attention also on monitoring patients' sit-to-stand body transition other than more acknowledged features based on step quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Communicable Disease Control , Gait , Gait Analysis , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Postural Balance , SARS-CoV-2 , Smartphone , Time and Motion Studies
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