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1.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 32(10): 879-887, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524376

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus-2019 disease (COVID-19) pandemic has markedly restricted endoscopic and clinical activities in gastroenterology (GI), with a negative impact on trainee education. We aimed to inve stigate how and to what extent has GI trainees in Turkey are affected by the current pandemic in terms of general, psychological, and educational status. METHODS: We conducted a web-based survey sent electronically to 103 official GI trainees in Turkey from 37 centers. The 32-item survey included questions to capture demographic (5-questions), endoscopic (7-questions), personal protective equipment (PPE) (3-questions), psychological and general well-being (11-questions), and educational (6-questions) data. RESULTS: Ninety-six (93.2%) trainees completed the survey, of which 56.3% (n = 54) reported a decrease in independently performed endoscopic procedures. Due to pandemic, 91.7% of standard diagnostic endoscopic procedures, 57.2% of standard therapeutic procedures, and 67.7% of advanced endoscopic procedures were decreased. Out of 96 respondents, we detected signs of anxiety in 88.5%, exposure concern in 92.7%, concerns for prolongation of training period in 49%, loss of concentration and interest in 47.9%, and burnout syndrome in 63.5%. Female gender (odds-ratio: 3.856, 95% confidence interval: 1.221-12.174, P = .021) was the only independently associated factor with pandemic-related anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic has led to high amounts of anxiety and non-negligible rates of burnout syndrome among GI trainees, with a significant reduction in endoscopic activities. More effort and novel strategies are required to deliver sufficient competence and general-psychological well-being to GI trainees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gastroenterology/education , Pandemics , Adult , Education, Medical, Graduate , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
3.
Dig Dis Sci ; 66(11): 3635-3658, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406167

ABSTRACT

AIM: To report revolutionary reorganization of academic gastroenterology division from COVID-19 pandemic surge at metropolitan Detroit epicenter from 0 infected patients on March 9, 2020, to > 300 infected patients in hospital census in April 2020 and > 200 infected patients in April 2021. SETTING: GI Division, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, has 36 GI clinical faculty; performs > 23,000 endoscopies annually; fully accredited GI fellowship since 1973; employs > 400 house staff annually since 1995; tertiary academic hospital; predominantly voluntary attendings; and primary teaching hospital, Oakland-University-Medical-School. METHODS: This was a prospective study. Expert opinion. Personal experience includes Hospital GI chief > 14 years until 2020; GI fellowship program director, several hospitals > 20 years; author of > 300 publications in peer-reviewed GI journals; committee-member, Food-and-Drug-Administration-GI-Advisory Committee > 5 years; and key hospital/medical school committee memberships. Computerized PubMed literature review was performed on hospital changes and pandemic. Study was exempted/approved by Hospital IRB, April 14, 2020. RESULTS: Division reorganized patient care to add clinical capacity and minimize risks to staff of contracting COVID-19 infection. Affiliated medical school changes included: changing "live" to virtual lectures; canceling medical student GI electives; exempting medical students from treating COVID-19-infected patients; and graduating medical students on time despite partly missing clinical electives. Division was reorganized by changing "live" GI lectures to virtual lectures; four GI fellows temporarily reassigned as medical attendings supervising COVID-19-infected patients; temporarily mandated intubation of COVID-19-infected patients for esophagogastroduodenoscopy; postponing elective GI endoscopies; and reducing average number of endoscopies from 100 to 4 per weekday during pandemic peak! GI clinic visits reduced by half (postponing non-urgent visits), and physical visits replaced by virtual visits. Economic pandemic impact included temporary, hospital deficit subsequently relieved by federal grants; hospital employee terminations/furloughs; and severe temporary decline in GI practitioner's income during surge. Hospital temporarily enhanced security and gradually ameliorated facemask shortage. GI program director contacted GI fellows twice weekly to ameliorate pandemic-induced stress. Divisional parties held virtually. GI fellowship applicants interviewed virtually. Graduate medical education changes included weekly committee meetings to monitor pandemic-induced changes; program managers working from home; canceling ACGME annual fellowship survey, changing ACGME physical to virtual site visits; and changing national conventions from physical to virtual. CONCLUSION: Reports profound and pervasive GI divisional changes to maximize clinical resources devoted to COVID-19-infected patients and minimize risks of transmitting infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Economics, Hospital/organization & administration , Gastroenterology/education , Hospital Administration/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Cities/economics , Cities/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Gastroenterology/economics , Hospital Administration/economics , Humans , Internship and Residency , Michigan/epidemiology , Organizational Affiliation/economics , Organizational Affiliation/organization & administration , Prospective Studies , Schools, Medical/organization & administration
4.
Dig Dis Sci ; 66(3): 671-673, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358112

ABSTRACT

The year 2020 was challenging for many fellowship programs with regard to training or even burnouts. In this article, I will reflect on being a new program director having to deal with new responsibilities amidst an evolving pandemic. I highlight ten takeaway reflections with the hope that others may find these relevant to their current situation as training program leaders and mentors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Gastroenterology/education , Mentors/psychology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 116(9): 1876-1884, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278761

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Gastroenterologists at all levels of practice benefit from formal mentoring. Much of the current literature on mentoring in gastroenterology is based on expert opinion rather than data. In this study, we aimed to identify gender-related barriers to successful mentoring relationships from the mentor and mentee perspectives. METHODS: A voluntary, web-based survey was distributed to physicians at 20 academic institutions across the United States. Overall, 796 gastroenterology fellows and faculty received the survey link, with 334 physicians responding to the survey (42% response rate), of whom 299 (90%; 129 women and 170 men) completed mentorship questions and were included in analysis. RESULTS: Responses of women and men were compared. Compared with men, more women preferred a mentor of the same gender (38.6% women vs 4.2% men, P < 0.0001) but less often had one (45.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001). Women also reported having more difficulty finding a mentor (44.4% vs 16.0%, P < 0.0001) and more often cited inability to identify a mentor of the same gender as a contributing factor (12.8% vs 0.9%, P = 0.0004). More women mentors felt comfortable advising women mentees about work-life balance (88.3% vs 63.8%, P = 0.0005). Nonetheless, fewer women considered themselves effective mentors (33.3% vs 52.6%, P = 0.03). More women reported feeling pressured to mentor because of their gender (39.5% vs 0.9% of men, P < 0.0001). Despite no gender differences, one-third of respondents reported negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their ability to mentor and be mentored. DISCUSSION: Inequities exist in the experiences of women mentees and mentors in gastroenterology, which may affect career advancement and job satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Gastroenterology/education , Gender Equity , Mentoring , Adult , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Universities
6.
Korean J Gastroenterol ; 77(5): 205-213, 2021 05 25.
Article in Korean | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244285

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak caused numerous social and cultural changes, but few studies focused on their effects on gastroenterology (GI) fellowship training. This study evaluated the impact of COVID-19 on GI fellowship training. Methods: A web-based questionnaire was sent out to GI fellows in Korea between 15 February and 15 March 2021. The questionnaire included questions regarding the characteristics of GI fellows, perception of COVID-19 outbreak, impact of COVID-19 outbreak, and telemedicine on the education of a GI fellowship. Results: Among 111 answers, 94 respondents were analyzed. The GI fellows were provided with sufficient information about the COVID-19 outbreak (74.7%), well educated, and provided with personal protective equipment use (74.7% and 83.9%, respectively). On the other hand, outpatient schedule and volume decreased in 25.5% and 37.8% of respondents, respectively. Moreover, endoscopy sessions and volume decreased in 51.1% and 65.6% of respondents, respectively. As a result, 78.9% of respondents were concerned that the COVID-19 outbreak adversely affected their education. Telemedicine utilization was introduced during the COVID-19 outbreak, but only 20.0% and 10.6% of respondents agreed that telemedicine has benefits from the patient's and doctor's perspectives, respectively. In addition, only 25.9% of respondents were willing to continue telemedicine if adequately reimbursed, and 68.2% of respondents were concerned that it adversely affected their education. Conclusions: The COVID-19 outbreak has adversely affected GI fellowship training in Korea for outpatient clinics, gastrointestinal endoscopy, educational conferences, and telemedicine. This study highlights that GI fellowship training needs more attention in the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Gastroenterology/education , Physicians/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
7.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 36(10): 2715-2719, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192144

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a unique challenge that has disrupted endoscopy training. Initial infection control measures aimed at protecting patients and staff meant nonessential endoscopic activity was suspended in many countries. The decrease in elective caseload from the pandemic also reduced training numbers during this period. While hands-on training took a backseat, more efforts were directed to didactic training of cognitive competencies. We review the literature describing the impact of COVID-19 on endoscopy training and summarize key measures aimed at mitigating this effect. These include leveraging on web-based didactic material and video-conferences, increased use of simulation and models to hone technical competencies, and a shift in focus from numbers-based accreditation to competency-based accreditation. While COVID-19 was hoped to be short-lived, it is clear the impact is long-lasting. Hence, it is crucial for training programs to take stock of how endoscopy training is evolving and use this opportunity to implement new paradigms into their endoscopic training curricula. COVID-19 might just be the catalyst that transforms endoscopy training into a new digital era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Endoscopy/education , Gastroenterology/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans
10.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 427-431, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033472

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted education-related activities, including the conduct of examinations. We review the literature regarding high-stakes examinations during the pandemic, discuss the decision-making process of whether to proceed with a high-stakes examination and share published experiences in conducting high-stakes examinations during the pandemic. We illustrate our own recent experiences of decision-making and conduct of our high-stakes gastroenterology licencing examinations during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is possible to conduct high-stakes examinations virtually during pandemic situations with fidelity and adherence to the established format and standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement/methods , Gastroenterology/education , Licensure/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
11.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr ; 72(4): 514-519, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007366

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected graduate medical education with redistribution of trainees, altered clinical care, and decreased research. For graduating trainees, there remains concern that financial stability of health systems will affect the availability of new positions and hiring practices. This survey aims to evaluate the pandemic's impact from pediatric gastroenterology fellows' perspectives. METHODS: An anonymous survey was distributed by e-mail from June 11 to July 1, 2020 to all North American pediatric gastroenterology and advanced training fellows. The survey was tailored for the fellows' year of training including questions on education, clinical experience, research, and job outlook. RESULTS: Of the 434 pediatric gastroenterology fellows, 145 completed the survey. Of all respondents, negative impact was reported in 52% on clinical training, 46% research projects, and 41% procedural confidence. A majority (93%) of third-year respondents had a job contract signed at the time of the survey; however, 18% of those contracts were subsequently altered with 5 respondents having job contracts rescinded due to hiring freezes. Fifty-four percent of first- and second-year fellow respondents reported concern regarding finding a job with the majority being second-year fellows (78%). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect the medical system and healthcare professionals. This survey identified significant impact on job acquisition for graduating pediatric gastroenterology fellows and other critical components of training, which are likely applicable to other pediatric trainees. The survey results raise questions about potential strategies to improve medical education and job search success for graduating trainees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Employment , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gastroenterology/education , Pandemics , Child , Contracts , Humans , Pediatrics , Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Dig Dis Sci ; 66(10): 3307-3311, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted numerous facets of healthcare workers' lives. There have also been significant changes in Gastroenterology (GI) fellowship training as a result of the challenges presented by the pandemic. AIMS: We conducted a national survey of Gastroenterology fellows to evaluate fellows' perceptions, changes in clinical duties, and education during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was sent to Gastroenterology (GI) fellows in the USA. Information regarding redeployment, fellow restriction in endoscopy, outpatient clinics and inpatient consults, impact on educational activities, and available wellness resources was obtained. Fellows' level of agreement with adjustments to clinical duties was also assessed. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-seven Gastroenterology fellows responded, and 29.4% were redeployed to non-GI services during the pandemic. COVID-19 impacted all aspects of GI fellowship training in the USA (endoscopy, outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, educational activities). Fellows' level of agreement in changes to various aspects of fellowship varied. 72.5% of respondents reported that their programs provided them with increased wellness resources to cope with the additional stress during the pandemic. For respondents with children, 17.6% reported no support with childcare. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted GI fellowship training in the USA in multiple domains, including gastrointestinal endoscopy, inpatient consults, outpatient clinics, and educational conferences. Our study highlights the importance of considering and incorporating fellows' viewpoints, as changes are made in response to the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastroenterologists/statistics & numerical data , Gastroenterology/education , Adult , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gastroenterology/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Int J Clin Pract ; 74(12): e13717, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-780894

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected almost every country on the globe, affecting 185 countries with more than 2.6 million cases and 182,000 deaths as of April 22, 2020. The United States (US) has seen an exponential surge in the COVID-19 patients and has become the epicentre with more than 845,000 confirmed cases and 46,000 deaths. The governments and healthcare providers all over the world are racing with time to reduce the rate of increase in active cases by social distancing to flatten the curve of this pandemic. Practicing gastroenterologists are facing multiple challenges in the safe practice of medicine because of patient's inability to visit physicians' offices, endoscopy centers and the threat of potential virus spread through gastrointestinal secretions by endoscopies in emergent cases. The gastroenterological associations from Europe and North America have made position statements to guide gastroenterologists to navigate through the clinical practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. Gastroenterology fellows are on the frontlines during the COVID-19 pandemic, experiencing personal, physical and economic stresses. They had to balance the programmatic changes to meet the demands of the patient care with the additional pressure to meet training requirements. Given the imperatives for social and physical distancing, training programmes have to implement innovative educational methods to substitute traditional teaching. Healthcare organisations must synchronise institutional workforce needs with trainee safety, education and well-being. In this perspective, we have discussed the challenges that can be anticipated and implementing strategies to support fellows during the times of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastroenterology/education , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Anxiety/etiology , Biomedical Research , Congresses as Topic , Decontamination , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Graduate , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/education , Fellowships and Scholarships , Health Policy , Humans , Infection Control , Occupational Stress/etiology , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Teaching Rounds , Telemedicine , Uncertainty
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