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1.
Obes Surg ; 32(5): 1451-1458, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1681711

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare sleeve gastrectomy (SG) to SG associated with Rossetti fundoplication (SG + RF) in terms of de novo gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) after surgery, weight loss, and postoperative complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients affected by morbid obesity, without symptoms of GERD, who were never in therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were randomized into two groups. One group underwent SG and the other SG + RF. The study was stopped on February 2020 due to the COVID pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 278 patients of the programmed number of 404 patients were enrolled (68.8%). De novo esophagitis was considered in those patients who had both pre- and postoperative gastroscopy (97/278, 34.9%). Two hundred fifty-one patients (90.3%) had completed clinical follow-up at 12 months. SG + RF resulted in an adequate weight loss, similar to classic SG at 12-month follow-up (%TWL = 35. 4 ± 7.2%) with a significantly better outcome in terms of GERD development. One year after surgery, PPIs were necessary in 4.3% SG + RF patients compared to 17.1% SG patients (p = 0.001). Esophagitis was present in 2.0% of SG + RF patients versus 23.4% SG patients (p = 0.002). The main complication after SG + RF was wrap perforation (4.3%), which improved with the surgeon's learning curve. CONCLUSION: SG + RF seemed to be an effective alternative to classic SG in preventing de novo GERD. More studies are needed to establish that an adequate learning curve decreases the higher percentage of short-term complications in the SG + RF group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Esophagitis , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Laparoscopy , Obesity, Morbid , Esophagitis/etiology , Fundoplication/adverse effects , Gastrectomy/adverse effects , Gastrectomy/methods , Gastroesophageal Reflux/diagnosis , Humans , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Proton Pump Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Weight Loss
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20987, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483149

ABSTRACT

Acid suppressants are widely-used classes of medications linked to increased risks of aerodigestive infections. Prior studies of these medications as potentially reversible risk factors for COVID-19 have been conflicting. We aimed to determine the impact of chronic acid suppression use on COVID-19 infection risk while simultaneously evaluating the influence of social determinants of health to validate known and discover novel risk factors. We assessed the association of chronic acid suppression with incident COVID-19 in a 1:1 case-control study of 900 patients tested across three academic medical centers in California, USA. Medical comorbidities and history of chronic acid suppression use were manually extracted from health records by physicians following a pre-specified protocol. Socio-behavioral factors by geomapping publicly-available data to patient zip codes were incorporated. We identified no evidence to support an association between chronic acid suppression and COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio 1.04, 95% CI 0.92-1.17, P = 0.515). However, several medical and social features were positive (Latinx ethnicity, BMI ≥ 30, dementia, public transportation use, month of the pandemic) and negative (female sex, concurrent solid tumor, alcohol use disorder) predictors of new infection. These findings demonstrate the value of integrating publicly-available databases with medical data to identify critical features of communicable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Gastroesophageal Reflux/complications , Social Determinants of Health , Aged , Behavior , COVID-19/psychology , California , Case-Control Studies , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Factual , Female , Gastroenterology , Gastroesophageal Reflux/drug therapy , Geography , Histamine H2 Antagonists/pharmacology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Proton Pump Inhibitors/pharmacology , Risk Factors , Social Class
3.
United European Gastroenterol J ; 9(9): 1081-1090, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients are at increased risk for thromboembolic events. It is unclear whether the risk for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is also increased. METHODS: We considered 4128 COVID-19 patients enrolled in the Lean European Open Survey on SARS-CoV-2 (LEOSS) registry. The association between occurrence of GI bleeding and comorbidities as well as medication were examined. In addition, 1216 patients from COKA registry were analyzed focusing on endoscopy diagnostic findings. RESULTS: A cumulative number of 97 patients (1.8%) with GI bleeding were identified in the LEOSS registry and COKA registry. Of 4128 patients from the LEOSS registry, 66 patients (1.6%) had a GI bleeding. The rate of GI bleeding in patients with intensive care unit (ICU) admission was 4.5%. The use of therapeutic dose of anticoagulants showed a significant association with the increased incidence of bleeding in the critical phase of disease. The Charlson comorbidity index and the COVID-19 severity index were significantly higher in the group of patients with GI bleeding than in the group of patients without GI bleeding (5.83 (SD = 2.93) vs. 3.66 (SD = 3.06), p < 0.01 and 3.26 (SD = 1.69) vs. 2.33 (SD = 1.53), p < 0.01, respectively). In the COKA registry 31 patients (2.5%) developed a GI bleeding. Of these, the source of bleeding was identified in upper GI tract in 21 patients (67.7%) with ulcer as the most frequent bleeding source (25.8%, n = 8) followed by gastroesophageal reflux (16.1%, n = 5). In three patients (9.7%) GI bleeding source was located in lower GI tract caused mainly by diverticular bleeding (6.5%, n = 2). In seven patients (22.6%) the bleeding localization remained unknown. CONCLUSION: Consistent with previous research, comorbidities and disease severity correlate with the incidence of GI bleeding. Also, therapeutic anticoagulation seems to be associated with a higher risk of GI bleeding. Overall, the risk of GI bleeding seems not to be increased in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Critical Illness , Diverticular Diseases/diagnosis , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Gastroesophageal Reflux/complications , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/etiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Peptic Ulcer/diagnosis , Registries , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
4.
Hum Mol Genet ; 31(3): 471-480, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434399

ABSTRACT

Symptoms related with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) were previously shown to be linked with increased risk for the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19). We aim to interrogate the possibility of a shared genetic basis between GERD and COVID-19 outcomes. Using published GWAS data for GERD (78 707 cases; 288 734 controls) and COVID-19 susceptibility (up to 32 494 cases; 1.5 million controls), we examined the genetic relationship between GERD and three COVID-19 outcomes: risk of developing severe COVID-19, COVID-19 hospitalization and overall COVID-19 risk. We estimated the genetic correlation between GERD and COVID-19 outcomes followed by Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses to assess genetic causality. Conditional analyses were conducted to examine whether known COVID-19 risk factors (obesity, smoking, type-II diabetes, coronary artery disease) can explain the relationship between GERD and COVID-19. We found small to moderate genetic correlations between GERD and COVID-19 outcomes (rg between 0.06 and 0.24). MR analyses revealed a OR of 1.15 (95% CI: 0.96-1.39) for severe COVID-19; 1.16 (1.01-1.34) for risk of COVID-19 hospitalization; 1.05 (0.97-1.13) for overall risk of COVID-19 per doubling of odds in developing GERD. The genetic correlation/associations between GERD and COVID-19 showed mild attenuation towards the null when obesity and smoking was adjusted for. Susceptibility for GERD and risk of COVID-19 hospitalization were genetically correlated, with MR findings supporting a potential causal role between the two. The genetic association between GERD and COVID-19 was partially attenuated when obesity is accounted for, consistent with obesity being a major risk factor for both diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Gastroesophageal Reflux/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/genetics , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Female , Gastroesophageal Reflux/complications , Gastroesophageal Reflux/virology , Genome-Wide Association Study , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Obesity/complications , Obesity/genetics , Obesity/virology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Smoking/adverse effects
6.
J Dig Dis ; 22(4): 187-203, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189611
10.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 22(6)2020 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916456

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the clinical characteristics and transmission rate of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a community inpatient long-term care psychiatric rehabilitation facility designed for persons with serious mental illness to provide insight into transmission and symptom patterns and emerging testing protocols, as well as medical complications and prognosis. METHODS: This study examined a cohort of 54 residents of a long-term care psychiatric rehabilitation program from March to April 2020. Baseline demographics, clinical diagnoses, and vital signs were examined to look for statistical differences between positive versus negative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) groups. During the early phase of the pandemic, the facility closely followed the local shelter-in-place order (starting March 19, 2020) and symptom-based testing. RESULTS: Of the residents, the primary psychiatric diagnoses were schizoaffective disorder: 28 (51.9%), schizophrenia: 21 (38.9%), bipolar I disorder: 3 (5.5%), and unspecified psychotic disorder: 2 (3.7%). Forty (74%) of 54 residents tested positive for SARS-COV-2, with a doubling time of 3.9 days. There were no statistical differences between the positive SARS-COV-2 versus negative groups for age or race/ethnicity. Psychiatric and medical conditions were not significantly associated with contracting SARS-COV-2, with the exception of obesity (n = 17 [43%] positive vs n = 12 [86%] negative, P = .01). Medical monitoring of vital signs and symptoms did not lead to earlier detection. All of the residents completely recovered, with the last resident no longer showing any symptoms 24 days from the index case. CONCLUSION: Research is needed to determine optimal strategies for long-term care mental health settings that incorporate frequent testing and personal protective equipment use to prevent rapid transmission of SARS-COV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/rehabilitation , Rehabilitation Centers , Schizophrenia/rehabilitation , Adult , African Americans , Asian Americans , Betacoronavirus , Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology , Bipolar Disorder/rehabilitation , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , California/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Gastroesophageal Reflux/epidemiology , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypothyroidism/epidemiology , Infection Control , Long-Term Care , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Psychiatric Rehabilitation , Psychotherapy, Group , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Recreation , Rehabilitation, Vocational , SARS-CoV-2 , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Visitors to Patients
12.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(10): 1707-1715, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732653

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increase the risk for enteric infections that is likely related to PPI-induced hypochlorhydria. Although the impact of acid suppression on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is unknown thus far, previous data revealed that pH ≤3 impairs the infectivity of the similar severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1. Thus, we aimed to determine whether use of PPIs increases the odds for acquiring coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among community-dwelling Americans. METHODS: From May 3 to June 24, 2020, we performed an online survey described to participating adults as a "national health survey." A multivariable logistic regression was performed on reporting a positive COVID-19 test to adjust for a wide range of confounding factors and to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Of 53,130 participants, 3,386 (6.4%) reported a positive COVID-19 test. In regression analysis, individuals using PPIs up to once daily (aOR 2.15; 95% CI, 1.90-2.44) or twice daily (aOR 3.67; 95% CI, 2.93-4.60) had significantly increased odds for reporting a positive COVID-19 test when compared with those not taking PPIs. Individuals taking histamine-2 receptor antagonists were not at elevated risk. DISCUSSION: We found evidence of an independent, dose-response relationship between the use of antisecretory medications and COVID-19 positivity; individuals taking PPIs twice daily have higher odds for reporting a positive test when compared with those using lower-dose PPIs up to once daily, and those taking the less potent histamine-2 receptor antagonists are not at increased risk. These findings emphasize good clinical practice that PPIs should only be used when indicated at the lowest effective dose, such as the approved once-daily label dosage of over-the-counter and prescription PPIs. Further studies examining the association between PPIs and COVID-19 are needed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Gastric Acid/metabolism , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Proton Pump Inhibitors/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Confounding Factors, Epidemiologic , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gastric Mucosa/drug effects , Gastric Mucosa/metabolism , Gastroesophageal Reflux/drug therapy , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Heartburn/drug therapy , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration/drug effects , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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