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3.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 246-252, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544341

ABSTRACT

Recently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic. Several studies indicate that the digestive system can also be affected by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Therefore, patients with digestive symptoms should have a capsule endoscopy (CE). COVID-19 patients with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms who underwent CE were recruited from March 2020 to April 2020. We collected patients' data and performed a prospective follow-up study for 6 months. All 11 COVID-19 cases with GI symptoms who underwent CE presented gastritis. Eight cases (72.7%) had intestinal mucosa inflammation. Among them, two cases showed intestinal ulcers or erosions. Moreover, two cases displayed colonic mucositis. One case was lost during follow-up. At 3-6 months after hospital discharge, five patients underwent CE again, presenting gastrointestinal lesions. Five of the 10 cases had GI symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, and others. Among these five cases, the GI symptoms of three patients disappeared at the last follow-up and two patients still presented diarrhea symptoms. Overall, we observed damaged digestive tract mucosa that could be caused by SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, after discharge, some patients still presented intestinal lesions and GI symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Capsule Endoscopy , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Adult , Aged , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Gastritis/complications , Gastritis/diagnosis , Gastritis/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
4.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 298-302, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513873

ABSTRACT

For preventing the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, measures like wearing masks, social distancing, and hand hygiene played crucial roles. These measures may also have affected the expansion of other infectious diseases like respiratory tract infections (RTI) and gastro-intestinal infections (GII). Therefore, we aimed to investigate non-COVID-19 related RTI and GII during the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients with a diagnosis of an acute RTI (different locations) or acute GII documented anonymously in 994 general practitioner (GP) or 192 pediatrician practices in Germany were included. We compared the prevalence of acute RTI and GII between April 2019-March 2020 and April 2020-March 2021. In GP practices, 715,440 patients were diagnosed with RTI or GII in the nonpandemic period versus 468,753 in the pandemic period; the same trend was observed by pediatricians (275,033 vs. 165,127). By GPs, the strongest decrease was observed for the diagnosis of influenza (-71%, p < 0.001), followed by acute laryngitis (-64%, p < 0.001), acute lower respiratory infections (bronchitis) (-62%, p < 0.001), and intestinal infections (-40%, p < 0.001). In contrast, the relatively rare viral pneumonia strongly increased by 229% (p < 0.001). In pediatrician practices, there was a strong decrease in infection diagnoses, especially influenza (-90%, p < 0.001), pneumonia (-73%, p < 0.001 viral; -76%, p < 0.001 other pneumonias), and acute sinusitis (-66%, p < 0.001). No increase was observed for viral pneumonia in children. The considerable limitations concerning social life implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic to combat the spread of SARS-CoV-2 also resulted in an inadvertent but welcome reduction in other non-Covid-19 respiratory tract and gastro-intestinal infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Hand Hygiene/methods , Humans , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Prevalence , Young Adult
5.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 753249, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512021

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus SARS-CoV2 is evolving continuously with emergence of several variants of increasing transmission capabilities and pandemic potential. Generation of variants occurs through accumulation of mutations due to the RNA nature of viral genome, which is further enhanced by variable selection pressures of this ongoing pandemic. COVID-19 presentations of SARS-CoV2 are mainly pulmonary manifestations with or without mild gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatic symptoms. However, the virus has evolved beyond pulmonary manifestations to multisystem disorder due to systemic inflammation and cytokine storm. Definitive cause of acute or late onset of inflammation, infection in various organs, and host response to emerging variants lacks clarity and needs elucidation. Several studies have reported underlying diseases including diabetes, hypertension, obesity, cardio- and cerebrovascular disorders, and immunocompromised conditions as significant risk factors for severe form of COVID-19. Pre-existing liver and GI diseases are also highly predominant in the population, which can alter COVID-19 outcome due to altered immune status and host response. We aim to review the emerging variants of SARS-CoV2 and host response in patients with pre-existing liver and GI diseases. Methods: In this review, we have elucidated the emergence and characteristic features of new SARS-CoV2 variants, mechanisms of infection and host immune response, GI and hepatic manifestation with radiologic features of COVID-19, and outcomes in pre-existing liver and GI diseases. Key Findings: Emerging variants of concern (VOC) have shown increased transmissibility and virulence with severe COVID-19 presentation and mortality. There is a drastic swift of variants from the first wave to the next wave of infections with predominated major VOC including alpha (B.1.1.7, UK), beta (B.1.351, South Africa), gamma (B.1.1.28.1, Brazil), and delta (B1.1.617, India) variants. The mutations in the spike protein of VOC are implicated for increased receptor binding (N501Y, P681R) and immune escape (L452R, E484K/Q, T478K/R) to host response. Pre-existing liver and GI diseases not only have altered tissue expression and distribution of viral entry ACE2 receptor but also host protease TMPRSS2, which is required for both spike protein binding and cleavage to initiate infection. Altered immune status due to pre-existing conditions results in delayed virus clearance or prolonged viremia. Even though GI and hepatic manifestations of SARS-CoV2 are less severe, the detection of virus in patient's stool indicates GI tropism, replication, and shedding from the GI tract. COVID-19-induced liver injury, acute hepatic decompensation, and incidences of acute-on-chronic liver failure may change the disease outcomes. Conclusions: The changes in the spike protein of emerging variants, immunomodulation by viral proteins, and altered expression of host viral entry receptor in pre-existing diseases are the key determinants of host response to SARS-CoV2 and its disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Immunity , Liver , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22001, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510612

ABSTRACT

Intestinal epithelial cell damage caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection was thought to be associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and decreased fecal consistency. The association of the gastrointestinal symptoms with the COVID-19-mediated inflammatory response triggered by the gastrointestinal immune system was investigated in this paper. Intestinal inflammation marker fecal calprotectin along with serum calprotectin and other inflammatory markers were measured in COVID-19 cases with and without GI manifestations as well as healthy individuals. Analyses were performed to compare COVID-19 patient subgroups and healthy controls and examine the relationship between fecal and serum calprotectin levels with gastrointestinal symptoms and disease severity. COVID-19 patients (n = 70) were found to have markedly elevated median levels of fecal (124.3 vs. 25.0 µg/g; P < 0/0001) and serum calprotectin (3500 vs. 1060 ng/mL; P < 0/0001) compared with uninfected controls. Fecal and serum calprotectin levels were not significantly different between COVID-19 patients who displayed GI symptoms and those who did not. Compared with other acute phase markers, both fecal and serum calprotectin were superior in identifying COVID-19 patients who progressed to severe illness. Although the progression of COVID-19 disease is marked by an elevation of fecal and serum calprotectin, gastrointestinal symptoms or diarrhea were not correlated with calprotectin increase level.


Subject(s)
Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex , Adult , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1135, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19 patients mostly present with respiratory symptoms; however, gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations can also be seen either alone or along with respiratory symptoms. We aimed to evaluate the GI symptoms related to COVID-19. METHODS: This cross-sectional study retrospectively evaluated the medical files of 507 patients with confirmed or highly probable COVID-19. Based on their symptoms, patients were categorized into four groups: with GI symptoms alone (GIA), with respiratory symptoms alone (RA), with both GI and respiratory symptoms (GIR), and without GI or respiratory symptoms (WGIR). RESULTS: Of the 507 COVID-19 patients, 47.9% had at least one GI symptom; the most common was nausea and/or vomiting (31.6%). Patients in the GIA group were significantly older than those in the RA (P = 0.041) and GRI (P = 0.004) groups (54.70 ± 18.14 vs. 48.68 ± 14.67 and 46.80 ± 17.17 years, respectively). Groups were homogeneous with respect to gender. Leukopenia and lymphopenia were both less frequent in patients with GI symptoms compared to those without GI symptoms. Positive RT-PCR was significantly less frequent among patients with GI symptoms (44% vs. 100%, P < 0.001). Although mortality was lower in patients with GI symptoms (9.1%) in comparison with those without GI symptoms (13.3%), the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.134). CONCLUSION: The typical respiratory symptoms of COVID-19 are quite commonly accompanied by GI symptoms, with nausea and/or vomiting being the most prevalent. A subgroup of COVID-19 patients may exclusively present with GI symptoms. Special attention should be paid to these patients in order to avoid misdiagnosis or delayed treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(37): 6345-6347, 2021 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468514

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Although, respiratory symptoms are typical the digestive system is also a susceptible target with gastrointestinal symptoms present even in the absence of respiratory symptoms. The gastrointestinal symptoms of COVID-19 include diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, and nausea among other symptoms. Some questions that remain to be answered include: Do patients with gastrointestinal symptoms have a higher mortality? SARS-CoV-2 variants are already a global reality: Do these variants present with a greater prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms? Do patients with these symptoms warrant more intensive care unit care?


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , COVID-19/complications , Diarrhea/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(11): 1376-1384, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There are no head-to-head trials of different dose escalation strategies of methotrexate (MTX) in RA. We compared the efficacy, safety and tolerability of 'usual' (5 mg every 4 weeks) versus 'fast' (5 mg every 2 weeks) escalation of oral MTX. METHODS: This multicentre, open-label (assessor blinded) RCT included patients 18-55 years of age having active RA with disease duration <5 years, and not on DMARDs. Patients were randomized 1:1 into usual or fast escalation groups, both groups starting MTX at 15 mg/week till a maximum of 25 mg/week. Primary outcome was EULAR good response at 16 weeks, secondary outcomes were ΔDAS28 and adverse effects (AE). Analyses were intention-to-treat. RESULTS: 178 patients with mean DAS28-CRP of 5.4(1.1) were randomized to usual (n=89) or fast escalation groups (n=89). At 16 weeks, there was no difference in good EULAR response in the usual (28.1%) or fast escalation (22.5%) groups (p=0.8). There was no difference in mean ΔDAS28-CRP at 8 weeks (-0.9, -0.8, p=0.72) or 16 weeks (-1.3, -1.3, p=0.98). Even at 24 weeks (extended follow-up), responses were similar. There were no inter-group differences in ΔHAQ, or MTX-polyglutamates 1-3 levels at 8 or 16 weeks. Gastrointestinal AE were higher in the fast escalation group over initial 8 weeks (27%, 40%, p=0.048), but not over 16 weeks. There was no difference in cytopenias, transaminitis, or drug discontinuation/dose reduction between the groups. No serious AE were seen. CONCLUSION: A faster MTX escalation strategy in RA was not more efficacious over 16-24 weeks, and did not significantly increase AE, except higher gastrointestinal AE initially. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CTRI/2018/12/016549.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/administration & dosage , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Methotrexate/administration & dosage , Adolescent , Adult , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/physiopathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/epidemiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Leukopenia/chemically induced , Leukopenia/epidemiology , Male , Methotrexate/analogs & derivatives , Methotrexate/blood , Middle Aged , Polyglutamic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Polyglutamic Acid/blood , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
10.
Pediatr Ann ; 50(8): e315-e319, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456367

ABSTRACT

Since its initial onset in 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spread quickly across the globe, resulting in the potentially life-threatening respiratory coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although less commonly reported, COVID-19 has also been associated with gastrointestinal and hepatic manifestations, which may occur more frequently in children. This has also led to concern about the susceptibility of children to the SARS-CoV-2 virus who have underlying chronic digestive disease and may be treated with immune suppression. As such, recommendations and expert consensus regarding the management of chronic gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary disease have been of great interest during the pandemic and international database reporting has informed our understanding. The impact of COVID-19 on the gastrointestinal tract and its influence on the management of pediatric digestive disease is reviewed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2021;50(8):e315-e319.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Digestive System Diseases , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Child , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 7880448, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455779

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-associated neuropsychiatric complications are soaring. There is an urgent need to understand the link between COVID-19 and neuropsychiatric disorders. To that end, this article addresses the premise that SARS-CoV-2 infection results in gut dysbiosis and an altered microbiota-gut-brain (MGB) axis that in turn contributes to the neuropsychiatric ramifications of COVID-19. Altered MGB axis activity has been implicated independently as a risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. A review of the changes in gut microbiota composition in individual psychiatric and neurological disorders and gut microbiota in COVID-19 patients revealed a shared "microbial signature" characterized by a lower microbial diversity and richness and a decrease in health-promoting anti-inflammatory commensal bacteria accompanied by an increase in opportunistic proinflammatory pathogens. Notably, there was a decrease in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) producing bacteria. SCFAs are key bioactive microbial metabolites with anti-inflammatory functions and have been recognized as a critical signaling pathway in the MGB axis. SCFA deficiency is associated with brain inflammation, considered a cardinal feature of neuropsychiatric disorders. The link between SARS-CoV-2 infection, gut dysbiosis, and altered MGB axis is further supported by COVID-19-associated gastrointestinal symptoms, a high number of SARS-CoV-2 receptors, angiotensin-cleaving enzyme-2 (ACE-2) in the gut, and viral presence in the fecal matter. The binding of SARS-CoV-2 to the receptor results in ACE-2 deficiency that leads to decreased transport of vital dietary components, gut dysbiosis, proinflammatory gut status, increased permeability of the gut-blood barrier (GBB), and systemic inflammation. More clinical research is needed to substantiate further the linkages described above and evaluate the potential significance of gut microbiota as a diagnostic tool. Meanwhile, it is prudent to propose changes in dietary recommendations in favor of a high fiber diet or supplementation with SCFAs or probiotics to prevent or alleviate the neuropsychiatric ramifications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Bacteria/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Diet , Dysbiosis , Feces/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Humans , Inflammation , Probiotics/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(18): 5836-5842, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451041

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Functional gastrointestinal disorders are common gastrointestinal diseases. The pathophysiology is multifactorial and psychosocial distress worsens symptoms severity. Since the end of 2019 the world has been facing COVID-19 pandemic. The associated control measures have affected the psychological health of people. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders among Italian children and adolescents. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study sample is composed of 407 patients (187 males, 220 females), aged from 10 to 17 years. The mean age is 14.27 ± 2.24 years. The study was conducted through the Italian version of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version.  The prevalence of each disorder has been calculated as the ratio of affected subjects for each disease and the total number of effective cases for that specific disease. RESULTS: The study demonstrates that the prevalence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder in Italian children, during the COVD-19 pandemic, is higher, compared with the one reported in the previous studies. The most frequent disorders are Abdominal Migraine and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Our study is the first one which provides data of the prevalence of Functional gastrointestinal disorders in sample of Italian adolescents, during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study underlines the need to focus on stress management, in order to reduce the effects of the lockdown on the psychological wellness of the youngest.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/complications , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Abdominal Pain/psychology , Adolescent , Aerophagy/epidemiology , Aerophagy/etiology , Aerophagy/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Constipation/epidemiology , Constipation/etiology , Constipation/psychology , Dyspepsia/epidemiology , Dyspepsia/etiology , Dyspepsia/psychology , Fecal Incontinence/epidemiology , Fecal Incontinence/etiology , Fecal Incontinence/psychology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/epidemiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/etiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/psychology , Italy , Male , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Migraine Disorders/etiology , Migraine Disorders/psychology , Prevalence , Rumination Syndrome/epidemiology , Rumination Syndrome/etiology , Rumination Syndrome/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/etiology , Vomiting/psychology
13.
PLoS Med ; 18(9): e1003773, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-COVID refers to a variety of symptoms affecting different organs reported by people following Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. To date, there have been no robust estimates of the incidence and co-occurrence of long-COVID features, their relationship to age, sex, or severity of infection, and the extent to which they are specific to COVID-19. The aim of this study is to address these issues. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on linked electronic health records (EHRs) data from 81 million patients including 273,618 COVID-19 survivors. The incidence and co-occurrence within 6 months and in the 3 to 6 months after COVID-19 diagnosis were calculated for 9 core features of long-COVID (breathing difficulties/breathlessness, fatigue/malaise, chest/throat pain, headache, abdominal symptoms, myalgia, other pain, cognitive symptoms, and anxiety/depression). Their co-occurrence network was also analyzed. Comparison with a propensity score-matched cohort of patients diagnosed with influenza during the same time period was achieved using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Cox proportional hazard model. The incidence of atopic dermatitis was used as a negative control. Among COVID-19 survivors (mean [SD] age: 46.3 [19.8], 55.6% female), 57.00% had one or more long-COVID feature recorded during the whole 6-month period (i.e., including the acute phase), and 36.55% between 3 and 6 months. The incidence of each feature was: abnormal breathing (18.71% in the 1- to 180-day period; 7.94% in the 90- to180-day period), fatigue/malaise (12.82%; 5.87%), chest/throat pain (12.60%; 5.71%), headache (8.67%; 4.63%), other pain (11.60%; 7.19%), abdominal symptoms (15.58%; 8.29%), myalgia (3.24%; 1.54%), cognitive symptoms (7.88%; 3.95%), and anxiety/depression (22.82%; 15.49%). All 9 features were more frequently reported after COVID-19 than after influenza (with an overall excess incidence of 16.60% and hazard ratios between 1.44 and 2.04, all p < 0.001), co-occurred more commonly, and formed a more interconnected network. Significant differences in incidence and co-occurrence were associated with sex, age, and illness severity. Besides the limitations inherent to EHR data, limitations of this study include that (i) the findings do not generalize to patients who have had COVID-19 but were not diagnosed, nor to patients who do not seek or receive medical attention when experiencing symptoms of long-COVID; (ii) the findings say nothing about the persistence of the clinical features; and (iii) the difference between cohorts might be affected by one cohort seeking or receiving more medical attention for their symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Long-COVID clinical features occurred and co-occurred frequently and showed some specificity to COVID-19, though they were also observed after influenza. Different long-COVID clinical profiles were observed based on demographics and illness severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Survivors , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , Incidence , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Pain/etiology , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Molecules ; 26(17)2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436074

ABSTRACT

Nutraceutical, a term derived from 'nutrition' and 'pharmaceutical', refers to any product isolated from herbs, nutrients, specific diets, processed foods, and beverages used not only for nutritional but also for medicinal purposes [...].


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/immunology , Dietary Supplements , Gastrointestinal Diseases/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Nutritional Status/immunology , Humans
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 711741, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430696

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is widespread worldwide and seriously affects the daily life and health of humans. Countries around the world are taking necessary measures to curb the spread. However, COVID-19 patients often have at least one organ complication and sequelae in addition to respiratory symptoms. Controlling the epidemic is only a phased victory, and the complication and sequelae of COVID-19 will need more attention in the post-epidemic era. We collected general information from over 1000 articles published in 2020 after the COVID-19 outbreak and systematically analyzed the complication and sequelae associated with eight major systems in COVID-19 patients caused by ACE2 intervention in the RAS regulatory axis. The autoimmune response induced by 2019-nCoV attacks and damages the normal tissues and organs of the body. Our research will help medical workers worldwide address COVID-19 complication and sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Endocrine System Diseases/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Urologic Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Disease Progression , Endocrine System Diseases/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Diseases/virology
16.
Curr Opin Infect Dis ; 34(5): 471-476, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408783

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The ubiquitous expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 receptors and its significance as the origin of viral entry have assisted in comprehending the pathophysiology of extrapulmonary manifestations of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In this review, we focus on the clinical significance of gastrointestinal manifestations. RECENT FINDINGS: The global pandemic, a result of the widespread implications of SARS-CoV-2, remains a significant burden to current healthcare systems. Fever, dyspnea, and tussive symptoms have primarily been recognized as the most common presenting signs/symptoms. During the past one year our scope of practice has transcended beyond the management of the respiratory system to incorporate other varying systemic manifestations such as anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. The outcomes reported by recent studies suggest an association between the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and important clinical factors such as delay in presentation, disease severity, and mortality. SUMMARY: We provide a summarization of the most recent in-depth investigations of coronavirus disease 2019 with gastrointestinal manifestations and their conclusions. Although the pathophysiology remains an area of evolving interest, a better understanding of this disease process may allow for early recognition, efficient triage, and improved prognostication for those presenting with gastrointestinal manifestations of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/pathology , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
17.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e048949, 2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common during childhood and adolescence. When a somatic diagnosis is excluded, the healthcare system often terminates contact with the patient. The aim of the present study was to learn more about children's and adolescents' experiences with, and reflections on, the causes of their abdominal pain and what could possibly help them. DESIGN: The study has a qualitative design. Interviews with open questions were carried out by the first author. The conversations were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. SETTING: Children and adolescents referred from general practitioners located in urban and rural regions in two municipals in Norway. In 2016 and 2019, we had interviewed these children's parents about their child's abdominal pain. In spring 2020, the children and adolescents were interviewed. PARTICIPANTS: Twelve children and adolescents aged 10-18 years with FGIDs. RESULTS: Eight of the children and adolescents had recovered from their abdominal pain, while four still had symptoms. They felt frustrated by not having a diagnosis and by the lack of available treatment. Some who had been absent from school for weeks to months felt isolated and depressed. Focusing on positive thoughts and activities was reported to improve the pain. The abdominal pain could be considered a manifestation of mental problems. CONCLUSIONS: Thinking differently about the symptoms reduced the FGIDs for the children and adolescents. The treating physicians as well as parents and teachers need to help the child focus on changing the mindset of pain.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pain Management , Parents , Qualitative Research
20.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol ; 31 Suppl 26: 92-95, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388380

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal symptoms are common findings in children with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Diarrhea and vomiting have been reported in about 8%-9% of cases, reaching more than 20% in some studies. Children with gastrointestinal involvement appear to be younger than those without, but the severity of the disease seems to be similar between the two groups of subjects. Fecal shedding in children has been reported in 20%-30% of children and has been observed in both those with and those without overt gastrointestinal involvement. Moreover, prolonged fecal elimination, lasting several days after negativization of real-time polymerase chain reaction assay on respiratory swabs, has been reported with variable frequency in children with SARS-CoV-2 infection. These observations raise the question regarding the possibility of oral-fecal transmission and the possible role of children in spreading the infection, particularly when they appear asymptomatic or with gastrointestinal symptoms but with no respiratory involvement, as well as during their convalescent phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Feces/virology , Humans , Virus Shedding
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