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1.
World J Gastroenterol ; 29(19): 3013-3026, 2023 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prolonged symptoms after corona virus disease 2019 (Long-COVID) in dialysis-dependent patients and kidney transplant (KT) recipients are important as a possible risk factor for organ dysfunctions, especially gastrointestinal (GI) problems, during immunosuppressive therapy. AIM: To identify the characteristics of GI manifestations of Long-COVID in patients with dialysis-dependent or KT status. METHODS: This observational, prospective study included patients with COVID-19 infection, confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, with the onset of symptoms between 1 January 2022 and 31 July 2022 which was explored at 3 mo after the onset, either through the out-patient follow-up or by telephone interviews. RESULTS: The 645 eligible participants consisted of 588 cases with hemodialysis (HD), 38 patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD), and 19 KT recipients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 infection during the observation. Of these, 577 (89.5%) cases agreed to the interviews, while 64 (10.9%) patients with HD and 4 (10.5%) cases of PD were excluded. The mean age was 52 ± 11 years with 52% women. The median dialysis duration was 7 ± 3 and 5 ± 1 years for HD and PD groups, respectively, and the median time post-transplantation was 6 ± 2 years. Long-COVID was identified in 293/524 (56%) and 21/34 (62%) in HD and PD, respectively, and 7/19 (37%) KT recipients. Fatigue was the most prevalent (96%) of the non-GI tract symptoms, whereas anorexia (90.9%), loss of taste (64.4%), and abdominal pain (62.5%) were the first three common GI manifestations of Long-COVID. Notably, there were 6 cases of mesenteric panniculitis from 19 patients with GI symptoms in the KT group. CONCLUSION: Different from patients with non-chronic kidney disease, there was a high prevalence of GI manifestations of Long-COVID in dialysis-dependent patients and KT recipients. An appropriate long-term follow-up in these vulnerable populations after COVID-19 infection is possibly necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Kidney Transplantation , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Male , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Prospective Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Cohort Studies , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology
2.
J Med Virol ; 95(4): e28709, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326322

ABSTRACT

Since early May 2022, outbreaks of Monkeypox (Mpox) cases have emerged and become a global concern. Studies exploring the gastrointestinal symptoms and/or liver injury of Mpox are still very limited. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to summarize the gastrointestinal symptoms reported by Mpox patients. We searched for Mpox studies published until October 21, 2022, in MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and organization websites. Mpox studies were observational studies that reported at least one of either gastrointestinal symptoms and/or liver injury in Mpox patients. Meta-analysis was done to obtain the pooled prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in Mpox patients. Subgroup analyses were done based on the study location, age groups, and Mpox Clades. The quality of included studies was assessed using the NIH Quality Assessment Tool. Overall, 31 studies that reported gastrointestinal symptoms and/or liver injury in Mpox patients were included. The reported gastrointestinal symptoms were abdominal pain, anorexia, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. There is a lack of reporting for liver injury. The most prevalent gastrointestinal symptoms in Mpox patients were anorexia (47%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 41%-53%), followed by vomiting (12%; 95% CI 11%-13%), nausea (10%; 95% CI 9%-11%), abdominal pain (9%; 95% CI 8%-10%), and diarrhea (5%; 95% CI 4%-6%). Additionally, the prevalence of proctitis, rectal/anal pain, and rectal bleeding were 11% (95% CI 11%-12%), 25% (95% CI 24%-27%), and 12% (95% CI 11%-13%), respectively. Anorexia was the most frequently reported gastrointestinal symptom in Mpox patients, followed by vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Proctitis is a novel presentation of Mpox in the 2022 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Monkeypox , Proctitis , Humans , Anorexia , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Vomiting/epidemiology , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Nausea , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology
4.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 23(1): 43, 2023 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271138

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is widely known to induce a variety of extrapulmonary manifestations. Gastrointestinal symptoms have been identified as the most common extra-pulmonary manifestations of COVID-19, with an incidence reported to range from 3 to 61%. Although previous reports have addressed abdominal complications with COVID-19, these have not been adequately elucidated for the omicron variant. The aim of our study was to clarify the diagnosis of concomitant abdominal diseases in patients with mild COVID-19 who presented to hospital with abdominal symptoms during the sixth and seventh waves of the pandemic of the omicron variant in Japan. METHODS: This study was a retrospective, single-center, descriptive study. In total, 2291 consecutive patients with COVID-19 who visited the Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Kansai Medical University Medical Center, Osaka, Japan, between January 2022 and September 2022 were potentially eligible for the study. Patients delivered by ambulance or transferred from other hospitals were not included. We collected and described physical examination results, medical history, laboratory data, computed tomography findings and treatments. Data collected included diagnostic characteristics, abdominal symptoms, extra-abdominal symptoms and complicated diagnosis other than that of COVID-19 for abdominal symptoms. RESULTS: Abdominal symptoms were present in 183 patients with COVID-19. The number of patients with each abdominal symptom were as follows: nausea and vomiting (86/183, 47%), abdominal pain (63/183, 34%), diarrhea (61/183, 33%), gastrointestinal bleeding (20/183, 11%) and anorexia (6/183, 3.3%). Of these patients, 17 were diagnosed as having acute hemorrhagic colitis, five had drug-induced adverse events, two had retroperitoneal hemorrhage, two had appendicitis, two had choledocholithiasis, two had constipation, and two had anuresis, among others. The localization of acute hemorrhagic colitis was the left-sided colon in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that acute hemorrhagic colitis was characteristic in mild cases of the omicron variant of COVID-19 with gastrointestinal bleeding. When examining patients with mild COVID-19 with gastrointestinal bleeding, the potential for acute hemorrhagic colitis should be kept in mind.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Japan/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/complications , Colitis/complications , Emergency Service, Hospital
5.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 34(3): 203-210, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239422

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our study aimed to present the general characteristics of patients in our country with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) having gastrointestinal system symptoms and the effects of gastrointestinal system symptoms on prognosis in the light of literature. METHODS: This retrospective single-center study included patients who tested positive for COVID-19 in polymerase chain reaction test and were treated as symptomatic inpatients between April 1, 2020, and May 15, 2020, at the Bursa City Hospital in Turkey. RESULTS: In our study, 292 patients with positive COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction test and symptoms were included to investigate the effect of gastrointestinal system symptoms in COVID-19 patients. Patients with at least 1 gastrointestinal system symptom were named group 1, and patients with no gastrointestinal system symptoms were named group 2. Compared with group 1 (145 patients), group 2 (147 patients) had patients with significantly older age (P = .010) and significantly higher rates of intensive care unit admission (P = .023), intubation (P = .021), and exitus (P = .004). The white blood cell count (P = .001) and C-reactive protein (P = .001) values were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is primarily a disease with respiratory symptoms, but gastrointestinal system symptoms are also seen. In our study, we found that patients with gastrointestinal system symptoms had a better prognosis. The reason for this may be the early hospitalization of the patients due to gastrointestinal system symptoms and the early initiation of treatment. However, comprehensive studies are still needed to elucidate this further.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Hospitalization
6.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 34(4): 322-331, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242408

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to find the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and to investigate the effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on the course of the disease during hospitalization. METHODS: Patients who were hospitalized due to COVID-19 were included in this retrospective study. The diagnostic method of COVID-19 was either a positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test or a typical finding in chest computed tomography. This study was conducted by contacting patients by phone 1 month after they were discharged from hospital to investigate gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients' laboratory findings at the time of admission, medications they used, and clinical findings were obtained from hospital records retrospectively. Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms were divided into 2 groups according to the start of treatment: pre-treatment and post-treatment groups. RESULTS: At least 1 gastrointestinal symptom (anorexia, weight loss, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain) was present in 67.5% of 435 patients (55.6% male, mean age 52.8). If anorexia and weight loss are excluded, the rate of the presence of at least 1 gastrointestinal symptom is 54%. Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 48.9% before the initiation of COVID-19 treatment. The most prevalent 3 symptoms were anorexia, weight loss, and diarrhea (56%, 52%, and 35.6%, respectively). Presence of pre-treatment gastrointestinal symptoms was associated with elevated C-reactive protein levels. Pre-treatment gastrointestinal symptoms were more common in those who received oxygen supply and who were intubated. Resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms takes longer time in those who were admitted to intensive care unit. Weight loss and diarrhea were more common in COVID-19 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who were intubated than who were not intubated. Abdominal pain was not found to be a significant predictor of disease severity. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of at least 1 gastrointestinal symptom in hospitalized COVID-19 patients was 67%. The most prevalent symptoms were anorexia, weight loss, and diarrhea. Presence of pre-treatment gastrointestinal symptoms was associated with elevated C-reactive protein levels, use of oxygen supply, and intubation. Gastrointestinal symptoms persist longer in those admitted to intensive care unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Anorexia/etiology , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , SARS-CoV-2 , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/etiology , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Hospitalization , Disease Progression , Oxygen
7.
World J Gastroenterol ; 29(4): 744-757, 2023 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2227073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the coronavirus on hospitalizations for gastrointestinal (GI) disease, particularly at a population level is understudied. AIM: To investigate trends in hospitalizations, inpatient endoscopy resource utilization, and outcomes during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns. METHODS: Using the California State Inpatient Database for 2018-2020, we explored year-to-year and 2020 month-to-month trends in hospitalizations, length of stay, and inpatient mortality (all-cause & viral pneumonia-specific) for common inpatient GI diagnoses including acute pancreatitis, diverticulitis, cholelithiasis, non-infectious gastroenteritis, upper and lower GI bleeding (LGIB), Clostridium difficile, viral gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and acute cholangitis. RESULTS: Disease-specific hospitalizations decreased for all included conditions except nonvariceal upper GI bleeding (NVUGIB), LGIB, and ulcerative colitis (UC) (ptrend < 0.0001). All-cause inpatient mortality was higher in 2020 vs 2019, for acute pancreatitis (P = 0.029), diverticulitis (P = 0.04), NVUGIB (P = 0.003), and Crohn's disease (P = 0.004). In 2020, hospitalization rates were lowest in April, November, and December. There was no significant corresponding increase in inpatient mortality except in UC (ptrend = 0.048). Viral pneumonia and viral pneumonia complicated by respiratory failure increased (P < 0.001) among GI hospitalizations. Endoscopy utilization within 24 h of admission was unchanged for GI emergencies except NVUGIB (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that hospitalization rates for common GI conditions significantly declined in California during the COVID pandemic, particularly in April, November and December 2020. All-cause mortality was significantly higher among acute pancreatitis, diverticulitis, NVUGIB, and Crohn's disease hospitalizations. Emergency endoscopy rates were mostly comparable between 2020 and 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Diverticulitis , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Pancreatitis , Humans , Crohn Disease/complications , Acute Disease , Pandemics , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/therapy , Pancreatitis/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Gastrointestinal Diseases/complications , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/complications , Colitis, Ulcerative/complications , Diverticulitis/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1048935, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199525

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) related symptoms among healthcare workers (HWs) who were in the fighting against COVID-19 in Nanjing of China, and further to examine the association between working place and FGIDs-related symptoms among HWs during the period of COVID-19 epidemic. Methods: An online anonymous survey was conducted among those HWs without history of FGIDs, who took part in the fighting against the COVID-19 epidemic between July and September of 2021 in Nanjing, China. All the 15 FGIDs-related symptoms included in the Rome IV diagnostic questionnaire for adults were investigated in this study. The outcome variable was the presence of FGIDs-related symptoms ("Yes" or "No"), while the independent measure was participants' working place ("in-ward" or "out-ward"). Logistics regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association of working place with FGIDs-related symptoms among those healthcare workers. Results: Totally, 336 eligible participants completed the survey. The prevalence of FGIDs-related symptoms was 48.8% (95%CI = 43.4%, 54.3%) among overall participants, with 40.7% (95%CI = 33.14%, 48.71%) and 56.3% (95%CI = 48.59%, 63.73%) for in-ward and out-ward HWs, respectively. Compared to their in-ward counterparts, those out-ward HWs were at a 1.88-fold likelihood (95%CI = 1.22, 2.89) to experience FGIDs-related symptoms during the period of fighting against the COVID-19 epidemic. After adjustment for potential confounders, such a positive association attenuated but still remained significant. Conclusions: A high prevalence of FGIDs-related symptoms was observed among those HWs who were without history of FGIDs during the fighting against COVID-19, and out-ward HWs were at a significantly higher risk to experience FGIDs-related symptoms relative to their in-ward counterparts in regional China. It has important implications that particular attention shall be paid to functional gastrointestinal issues for healthcare workers, especially those who are at uncertain risks of infectious diseases, when they participate in response to public health emergencies in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Adult , Humans , Prevalence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires , China/epidemiology
9.
Trop Biomed ; 39(3): 428-433, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067720

ABSTRACT

Lack of knowledge about the type and prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms as a clinical manifestation is one of the reasons for delayed diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 patients. This review study aimed to systematically review the type and prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in COVID-19 patients. To study the gastrointestinal manifestations of COVID-19, we used the 06- PRISMA registered in the CAMARADES-NC3Rs Preclinical Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Facility (SyRF) database. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases were searched for publications on the gastrointestinal manifestations of COVID-19 with no publication time frame. Articles were found using the following terms and search strategy: ["COVID-19, Coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, Clinical SymptomsGastrointestinal or gastric or intestinal manifestations"]. Out of 27652 papers, 35 papers on a total of 6730 COVID-19 patients up to 2022 met the inclusion criteria. Remarkably, most articles (28 papers, 77.8%) were from China (77.8%). The most common gastrointestinal manifestations were nausea or vomiting (13.1%), diarrhea (11.05%), anorexia (8.7%), and abdominal pain (2.4%), respectively. The findings of the present review revealed that contrary to what was initially assumed in the COVID-19 outbreak, this infection does not manifest only as respiratory symptoms but also as gastrointestinal symptoms. Therefore, clinicians and gastroenterologists must be alert to these unusual cases and fecal-oral transmission during the COVID-19 pandemic and implement preventive strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Top Companion Anim Med ; 50: 100696, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031701

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic affected not only the physical and emotional health of human beings but also cats. Restrictions put into effect during the pandemic resulted in changes in the daily routine of pet cats and the number of new pet owners. The current study aimed to evaluate the diseases induced by stress in cats, such as gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and urinary tract diseases. To this end, the study evaluated the pre-pandemic (n: 52) (March 2019-Feb 2020) and pandemic (n: 95) (March 2020-March 2021) diagnosis data of cats (n: 147) with gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and urinary system diseases admitted to the Internal Medicine Department of Hatay Mustafa Kemal University Veterinary Health, Practice and Research Center between March 2019 and March 2021. There was no statistically significant difference between the sexes of the cats admitted to the clinic in both periods. There was a significant change in cat breeds during the pandemic, except for the mixed-breed and Ankara breeds. The age (mean ± SEM) of the cats admitted to the clinic was 30.14 ± 4.24 months before the pandemic and 30.45 ± 3.43 during the pandemic. Distributions of gastrointestinal diseases in the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods were determined as 35.7% and 64.3%, respectively. During the pandemic, the number of gastritis cases was lower than that in the pre-pandemic period, and the number of gastroenteritis cases was higher than that in the pre-pandemic period. Except for gastrointestinal diseases (P <.05), a statistical difference between the periods was not found. The changes, especially influencing the daily routine of cats and causing stress, seem to have had significant effects on the gastrointestinal health of domestic cats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/veterinary , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sensory processing sensitivity is a personality or temperamental trait defined as individual differences in the tendency to perceive and process both positive and negative stimuli and experiences. Studies have shown that high sensitivity is correlated with psychosocial health, including depression and anxiety. However, its relationship with physical health has not been clarified. To fill this gap, using a large sample size with sufficient statistical power, an adult sample not including university students, and a range of covariates, this study examined the association between gastrointestinal symptoms as an indicator of physical health and sensory processing sensitivity. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, the participants were 863 Japanese adults (female = 450; male = 413; Mage = 30.4 years; SD = 4.9) who completed a web-based questionnaire. We statistically controlled for sociodemographic characteristics and examined whether sensory processing sensitivity is correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms. RESULTS: The results showed that highly sensitive individuals were more likely to experience a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms in the past week, including reflux symptoms, abdominal pain, indigestion symptoms, diarrhea symptoms, and constipation symptoms, even when statistically controlling for the participants' sociodemographic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that high sensory processing sensitivity is associated with physical health. Some of the potential causes of this are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Diseases , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Perception , Personality
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(36): e30297, 2022 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018319

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has emerged as a global health concern. This study aimed to review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of COVID-19 and provide evidence for the implementation of control measures. We utilized several online databases, including MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, USA), PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar, to collect relevant published papers using a combination of the following keywords: "COVID-19," "SARS-CoV-2," "novel coronavirus," "epidemiology," and "pathophysiology." The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used in this study. Globally, approximately 3-46% of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection experience gastrointestinal symptoms. The clinical spectrum of COVID-19 is wide, ranging from mild to severe, and even fatal. COVID-19 was initially reported as a respiratory tract disease; however, gastrointestinal symptoms have only recently been reported. COVID-19 Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms may have more severe clinical manifestations and poor prognosis. This study highlights the need to better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with COVID-19 to prevent the further spread of this pathogen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Maryland , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273000, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is evidence that perceived urgency of medical complaints is associated with emergency care utilization. Patients' perception of urgency can differ from physicians' assessment. This study explored public perceptions of urgency of severe cases of COVID-19 and inflammatory gastrointestinal disease and analyzed variations in perceptions of urgency by characteristics of the afflicted person in the vignettes and sociodemographic characteristics of respondents. METHODS: Vignettes with severe symptoms of either inflammatory gastrointestinal disease or COVID-19 with comparable urgency of treatment were used in a telephone survey in Germany (N = 1,207). Besides disease, the vignettes varied in terms of sex, age (child, middle-aged person, old person) and daytime (Tuesday morning, Tuesday evening). Respondents were asked to rate the urgency of the reported symptoms with four items. A sum scale was computed. Variations in perceptions of urgency according to vignette characteristics and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents (sex, age, educational level, migration background, children (yes/no) and personal affliction) were analyzed using a linear regression model. RESULTS: In terms of vignette characteristics, multivariate analysis showed a lower estimated urgency for males, as well as for the middle-aged and aged persons, compared to the child vignettes, and for COVID-19, compared to inflammatory gastrointestinal disease. Regarding the characteristics of the respondents, estimated urgency increased with age and was lower among respondents, who were previously affected by the symptoms themselves. CONCLUSION: Although urgency in the vignettes was comparable, variations in estimated urgency by age and sex of the afflicted person and the described disease as well as age and personal affliction of the respondents were identified. This could result in an inadequate health care service utilization. Therefore, variations in public perceptions of urgency should be considered in the planning of public campaigns on adequate health care services utilization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Aged , Child , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Public Opinion , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 33(11): 955-963, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1988284

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In patients with coronavirus disease 2019, the gastrointestinal symptoms have been reported increasingly in addition to the respiratory system symptoms. The studies show that the prevalence of gastrointestinal system symptoms and how the gastrointestinal system contributes to the severity and prognosis of the disease is still not clear. This study aims to find the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the correlation between the gastrointestinal symptoms and the clinical results in hospitalized patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: This study retrospectively analyzes patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 and hospitalized in the pandemic unit between March 2020 and August 2020 and compares their demographic and clinical characteristics, laboratory and radiologic findings, coronavirus disease 2019 treatments received, the clinical course of the disease, and the gastrointestinal symptoms. RESULTS: In our study, we included 322 patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 and hospitalized; 39 patients (12.1%) were admitted to the hospital with at least one gastrointestinal symptom (nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and the loss of taste). Nausea and vomiting are the most common gastrointestinal symptoms with a prevalence of 7.1%, followed by diarrhea with 2.8%, the loss of taste with 2.2%, and abdominal pain with 1.5%. The mean age and D-dimer levels of the patients showing gastrointestinal symptoms were lower than those who did not have any gastrointestinal symptoms. We did not find a significant correlation between the presence of the gastrointestinal symptoms and the severity of the disease, treatment received, risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock, admission to the intensive care unit, the need for mechanical ventilation, the mortality rate or the length of hospitalization in the medical floor or the intensive care unit. CONCLUSION: In this study, we observed that 12.1% of coronavirus disease 2019 patients apply to the hospital due to gastrointestinal symptoms. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal symptoms do not seem to affect the severity and the course of the disease, it is important to identify coronavirus disease 2019 patients showing unusual symptoms such as the gastrointestinal symptoms at an early stage to protect healthcare professionals from infection risk.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Turkey/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/etiology , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Vomiting , Nausea
15.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 47(9): 981-990, 2022 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901203

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted everyone, but there are few data regarding how the pandemic has influenced the lives of children with gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. This cross-sectional study assessed pandemic-related social disruption (PRSD) in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease (CD), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and the potential buffering effect of the parent-child relationship. METHODS: A survey completed between September and December 2020 asked 146 children (ages 8-17) diagnosed with IBD (n = 44), CD (n = 81), or IBS (n = 51) and 185 parents how the pandemic has contributed to social disruption (i.e., financial stability, COVID-19 exposure, school changes, GI needs, and isolation) and their social-emotional well-being. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the role of social disruption on well-being, and the moderating effect of the parent-child relationship. RESULTS: Increased social disruption predicted worse parent, ß = 0.24, p = .02, and child well-being, ß = 0.38, p < .01. The parent-child relationship moderated the relationship between parent and child well-being, ß = 0.21, p = .03. Strong parent-child relationships predicted a positive association between parent and child well-being, ß = 0.23, p = .003, whereas medium, ß = 0.09, p = .14, and poor, ß = -0.06, p = .52, relationships did not. CONCLUSIONS: PRSD negatively impacted the well-being of children with GI conditions, and the parent-child relationship moderated this relationship. These findings are relevant to pediatric psychologists treating the physical and mental health needs of children with GI conditions and their parents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Chronic Disease , Cross-Sectional Studies , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/psychology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/diagnosis , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/epidemiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/psychology , Pandemics
16.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(3): e0266921, 2022 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874519

ABSTRACT

The aim is determining the impact of non-pharmaceutical measures (NPIs) against SARS-CoV-2 in the incidence and prevalence of gastrointestinal viruses (GV) in children. Demographic, analytical, and clinical data of children from which samples were received at the Hospital Universitario La Paz (Madrid, Spain) and that had a gastrointestinal infection with a positive sample through multiplex-PCR for GV were collected. The time periods included were prepandemic (P1): March 14, 2019 to March 14, 2020 and pandemic (P2): March 15, 2020 to March 15, 2021. The global prevalence, relative incidence (RI, per 1,000 admissions) and absolute incidence (AI, per 100,000 population) of GV were compared for both time periods. The prevalence of GV versus SARS-CoV-2 was determined for P2. Seven-hundred and 50 out of 2,547 children analyzed in P1 and 106 out of 1,368 in P2 were positive by PCR for GV (46.3% decrease in P2). Prevalence and RI of GV declined in P2, except for the RI of rotavirus. Adenovirus showed the largest decreased of prevalence and RI (100%), followed by sapovirus. Astrovirus reduction was less pronounced (3.1% versus 0.4%). Norovirus was the most frequent virus in both time periods and its prevalence and RI also decreased in P2 (15.2% versus 4.7% and 3.40 versus 1.74, respectively). Rotavirus had the smallest decrease in prevalence (2.6% versus 2.5%), and its RI increased during P2 from 0.7 to 0.93. After removing the rotavirus vaccine strains from the analysis, the prevalence and RI decreased during P2 (2.1% to 0.7% and 0.5 to 0.3, respectively). The AI decreased during P2 in all GV, and the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 and GV was inversely proportional over time. Prevalence and incidence of GV have decreased during the pandemic, probably due to the implementation of NPIs against this virus and the reduction of health care attention to infections other than COVID-19. The differences in the decrease of prevalence and incidence for each virus may be explained by differences in the transmission and the resistance in the environment. Prevalence and RI of rotavirus might be biased since the PCR used detects both the infecting and the vaccine strains. IMPORTANCE Our original article contains an analysis of the impact of the measures applied against SARS-CoV-2 on the prevalence and incidence of GV in children. The small number of studies published to date that analyze the impact of these measures individually on each of the GV makes our study of great interest at this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Gastroenteritis , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Rotavirus , Viruses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Feces , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Pandemics , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
17.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 34(2): 168-176, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831515

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Studies have suggested that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appears to be more serious in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. This meta-analysis was conducted to explore the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, Embase, and Google Scholar on 16 October 2020, to identify observational studies that provided data on gastrointestinal symptoms and severity of COVID-19. Gastrointestinal symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. The severe rate and the odds ratio (OR) were pooled. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. RESULTS: A total of 21 studies with 5285 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The severe rate of COVID-19 patients with diarrhea was 41.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 31.0-51.5%], and the OR of association between diarrhea and severe COVID-19 was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.05-1.89); sensitivity analysis showed that the results for the OR and 95% CI were unstable. For abdominal pain, the severe rate and OR of association with severe COVID-19 were 59.3% (95% CI: 41.3-76.4%) and 2.76 (95% CI: 1.59-4.81), respectively; for nausea, 41.4% (95% CI: 23.2-60.7%) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.59-1.43), respectively; for vomiting, 51.3% (95% CI: 36.8-65.8%) and 1.68 (95% CI: 0.97-2.92), respectively. CONCLUSION: The severe rate was more than 40% in COVID-19 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Abdominal pain was associated with a near 2.8-fold increased risk of severe COVID-19; the relationship between diarrhea and the severity of COVID-19 was regionally different; nausea and vomiting were limited in association with an increased risk of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/etiology
18.
Clin Nutr ; 41(12): 2903-2909, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Critically ill COVID-19 patients seem hypermetabolic and difficult to feed enterally, due to gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms such as high gastric residual volumes (GRV) and diarrhea. Our aim was to describe the association of nutritional intake and GI symptoms during first 14 days of ICU admission. METHODS: Observational study including critically ill adult COVID-19 patients. Data on nutritional intake [enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition] and GI symptoms were collected during 14 days after ICU admission. Target energy and protein feeding goals were calculated conform ESPEN guidelines. GI symptoms included GRV (ml/d), vomiting, abdominal distension, and faeces (ml/d). High GRV's were classified as ≥2 times ≥150 ml/d and diarrhea as Bristol stool chart ≥6. GI symptoms were defined as mild if at least one symptom occurred and as moderate when ≥2 symptoms occurred. Acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI) grades of III were classified as GI dysfunction and grades of IV were considered as GI failure with severe impact on distant organs. Linear mixed model analysis was performed to explore the development of nutritional intake and GI symptoms over time at day (D) 0, 4, 10, and 14. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were included [75% male; median age 64 years (IQR 54-70)]. BMI upon admission was 28 kg/m2 (IQR 25-33), of which 43% obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Most patients received EN during admission (98% D4; 96% D10-14). Mean energy goals increased from 87% at D4 to 93% D10-14 and protein goals (g/kg) were increasingly achieved during admission (84% D4; 93% D10-14). Presence of moderate GI symptoms decreased (10% D0; 6% D4-10; 5% D14), reversely mild GI symptoms increased. Occurrence of GI dysfunction fluctuated (1% D0; 18% D4; 12% D10; 8% D14) and none of patients developed grade IV GI failure. Development of high GRV fluctuated (5% D0; 23% D4; 14% D10; 8% D14) and occurrence of diarrhea slightly increased during admission (5% D0; 22% D4; 25% D10; 27% D14). Linear mixed models showed only an association between AGI grades III and lower protein intake at day 10 (p = 0.020). CONCLUSION: Occurrence of GI symptoms was limited and seems no major barrier for EN in our group of critically COVID-19 patients. Nutritional intake was just below requirements during the first 14 days of ICU admission. The effect on nutritional status remains to be studied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Adult , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Critical Illness/therapy , Intensive Care Units , COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Eating , Diarrhea/epidemiology
19.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 22(1): 119, 2022 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to find the association between gastrointestinal (GI) and respiratory symptoms with mortality and hospitalization among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We analyzed the registered data of COVID-19 patients from February 20, 2020, to March 10, 2021. Depending on the patients' disease symptoms, four categories were defined: patients with only GI symptoms, patients with only respiratory symptoms, patients with both symptoms, and patients with other symptoms. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association of groups with outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 42,964 patients from 23 hospitals were included, of which 26.5% patients had at least one or more GI symptoms. Of total patients, 51.58% patients were hospitalized among which 22.8% had at least one or more GI symptoms. GI symptoms significantly decreased the odds of mortality (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.56-0.92), but respiratory symptoms increased the odds for mortality (1.36: 1.24-1.50), compared with patients with other symptoms. Moreover, the odds ratio of patients who had both respiratory and GI symptoms increased (1.52: 1.31-1.78) compared with patients with other symptoms. The same results were observed for hospitalization as the outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the presence of GI symptoms in COVID-19 at the time of admission was associated with a lower odds of hospitalization and mortality; however, this association had higher odds for respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Odds Ratio , SARS-CoV-2
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