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1.
Nature ; 603(7901): 362, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751699
2.
Science ; 375(6585): 1111-1113, 2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735999

ABSTRACT

Investment in gender-responsive social protection systems and evidence is key to a more equal future post-COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Policy , Caregivers , Employment , Female , Gender Equity , Humans , Male , Violence , Women, Working
5.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 78(22): 1997-1998, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364734
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e048292, 2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to widen existing gender inequities worldwide. A growing body of literature assesses the harmful consequences of public health emergencies (PHEs) for women and girls; however, evidence of what works to alleviate such impacts is limited. To inform viable mitigation strategies, we reviewed the evidence on gender-based interventions implemented in PHEs, including disease outbreaks and natural disasters. METHODS: We conducted a rapid scoping review to identify eligible studies by systematically searching the databases MEDLINE, Global Health and Web of Science with the latest search update on 28 May 2021. We used the Sustainable Development Goals as a guiding framework to identify eligible outcomes of gender (in)equality. RESULTS: Out of 13 920 records, 16 studies met our eligibility criteria. These included experimental (3), cohort (2), case-control (3) and cross-sectional (9) studies conducted in the context of natural disasters (earthquakes, droughts and storms) or epidemics (Zika, Ebola and COVID-19). Six studies were implemented in Asia, seven in North/Central America and three in Africa. Interventions included economic empowerment programmes (5); health promotion, largely focused on reproductive health (10); and a postearthquake resettlement programme (1). Included studies assessed gender-based outcomes in the domains of sexual and reproductive health, equal opportunities, access to economic resources, violence and health. There was a dearth of evidence for other outcome domains relevant to gender equity such as harmful practices, sanitation and hygiene practices, workplace discrimination and unpaid work. Economic empowerment interventions showed promise in promoting women's and girls' economic and educational opportunities as well as their sexual and reproductive health during PHEs. However, some programme beneficiaries may be at risk of experiencing unintended harms such as an increase in domestic violence. Focused reproductive health promotion may also be an effective strategy for supporting women's sexual and reproductive health, although additional experimental evidence is needed. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified critical evidence gaps to guide future research on approaches to alleviating gender inequities during PHEs. We further highlight that interventions to promote gender equity in PHEs should take into account possible harmful side effects such as increased gender-based violence. REVIEW REGISTRATION: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/8HKFD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergencies , Female , Gender Equity , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Prim Dent J ; 10(2): 23-27, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346180
14.
Science ; 371(6530): 660, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334525
17.
Prehosp Disaster Med ; 36(4): 445-449, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287741

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Gender disparities between Emergency Medicine physicians with regards to salary, promotion, and scholarly recognition as national conference speakers have been well-documented. However, little is known if similar gender disparities impact their out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) colleagues. Although there have been improvements in the ratio of women entering the EMS workforce, gender representation has improved at a slower rate for paramedics compared to emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Since recruitment, retention, and advancement of females within a specialty have been associated with the visibility of prominent, respected female leaders, gender disparity of these leaders as national conference speakers may contribute to the "leaky pipeline effect" seen within the EMS profession. Gender representation of these speakers has yet to be described objectively. STUDY OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to determine if disparity exists in gender representation of speakers at well-known national EMS conferences and trade shows in the United States (US) from 2016-2020. The secondary objective was to determine if males were more likely than females to return to a conference as a speaker in subsequent years. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of programs from well-known national conferences, specifically for EMS providers, which were held in the US from 2016-2020 was performed. Programs were abstracted for type of conference session (pre-conference, keynote, main conference) and speakers' names. Speaker gender (male, female) was confirmed via internet search. RESULTS: Seventeen conference programs were obtained with 1,709 conference sessions that had a total of 2,731 listed speaker names, of whom 537 (20%) were female. A total of 30 keynote addresses had 39 listed speaker names of whom six (15%) were female. No significant difference was observed in the number of years males returned to present at the same conference as compared to females. CONCLUSION: Gender representation of speakers at national EMS conferences in the US is not reflective of the current best estimate of the US EMS workforce. This disparity exists not only in the overall percent of female names listed as speakers, but also in the percent of individual female speakers, and is most pronounced within keynote speakers. Online lecture platforms, as an unintentional consequent of the COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with intentional speaker development and mentorship initiatives, may reduce barriers to facilitating a new pipeline for more females to become speakers at national EMS conferences.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Emergency Medicine , Gender Equity , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Male
19.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(11): 1595-1600, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has demonstrated the value of highly skilled and extensively trained specialists in clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious diseases (ID). Training curricula in CM and ID must constantly evolve to prepare trainees for future pandemics and to allow trainees to reach their full clinical and academic potential. OBJECTIVES: In this narrative review, we aim to outline necessary future adaptations in CM and ID training curricula and identify current structural barriers in training with the aim of discussing possibilities to address these shortcomings. SOURCES: We reviewed literature from PubMed and included selected books and online publications as appropriate. There was no time constraint on the included publications. CONTENT: Drawing from the lessons learnt during the pandemic, we summarize novel digital technologies relevant to CM and ID trainees and highlight interdisciplinary teamwork and networking skills as important competencies. We centre CM and ID training within the One Health framework and discuss gender inequalities and structural racism as barriers in both CM and ID training and patient care. IMPLICATIONS: CM and ID trainees should receive training and support developing skills in novel digital technologies, leadership, interdisciplinary teamwork and networking. Equally important is the need for equity of opportunity, with firm commitments to end gender inequality and structural racism in CM and ID. Policy-makers and CM and ID societies should ensure that trainees are better equipped to achieve their professional goals and are better prepared for the challenges awaiting in their fields.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Microbiology/education , Specialization , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Gender Equity , Humans , One Health , Pandemics , Racism
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